Sending Cake To Iraq

Baking By leafO Updated 27 Jan 2011 , 5:06pm by Mb20fan

leafO Posted 26 Jan 2011 , 2:03pm
post #1 of 14

What is the best way to send cupcakes to my brother in Iraq? I was thinking of maybe baking them in mason jars but I've never done it before. How long do they last when baked and sealed in the jar? Any tips or tricks for baking in a jar and shipping far away? Thanks in advance!

13 replies
leily Posted 26 Jan 2011 , 2:08pm
post #2 of 14

personally i wouldn't bake in the jars, but you can slide one in. If you do a search of the forums for "cupcake jar" i know i've seen previous topics on cupcakes in jars.

scp1127 Posted 27 Jan 2011 , 3:36am
post #3 of 14

I use a food saver. Put un-iced cupcakes in bag and take air out but don't smash. Put icing in a piping bag marked where it needs to be cut. Send a note with instructions on how to frost them.

leafO Posted 27 Jan 2011 , 4:05am
post #4 of 14

oooo...that's a great idea to use a food saver, I wish I had one

scp1127 Posted 27 Jan 2011 , 10:44am
post #5 of 14

It will pay for itself many times over. We never have freezer burn, cheeses are perfect forever, cooked ahead meals that are frozen are perfect, cookie dough is frozen for later(personal use), and the overseas mailing will save you enough over time to pay for it. All of my Christmas food mailings arrived perfectly. I keep all of my fondant in it too.

scp1127 Posted 27 Jan 2011 , 10:45am
post #6 of 14

It will pay for itself many times over. We never have freezer burn, cheeses are perfect forever, cooked ahead meals that are frozen are perfect, cookie dough is frozen for later(personal use), and the overseas mailing will save you enough over time to pay for it. All of my Christmas food mailings arrived perfectly. I keep all of my fondant in it too.

leafO Posted 27 Jan 2011 , 4:14pm
post #7 of 14

Thanks scp! It just got moved to the top of the list of tools I'm saving up for! It would be really great for storing fondant! icon_biggrin.gif

leafO Posted 27 Jan 2011 , 4:16pm
post #8 of 14

I had read somewhere that you can bake cake in a mason jar and then put the lids on while they are warm and it seals the jar. Does anyone have experience doing this?

JaeRodriguez Posted 27 Jan 2011 , 4:21pm
post #9 of 14

Leaf0- I know there is a thread from a while ago discussing "jarring" cakes vs baking them and then putting them in jars and sending, I will search for it and see if I can find it for you.

leafO Posted 27 Jan 2011 , 4:26pm
post #11 of 14

Thanks so much! icon_biggrin.gif

JaeRodriguez Posted 27 Jan 2011 , 4:30pm
post #12 of 14

You're welcome! Let us know how they turn out if you send them! :]

chefjess819 Posted 27 Jan 2011 , 4:46pm
post #13 of 14

for the food sealers, check your local thrift shops. i found one for $5 that still had the box with it and came with a brand new roll of the bags. thumbs_up.gif

Mb20fan Posted 27 Jan 2011 , 5:06pm
post #14 of 14

Here's an excerpt from an article I had read...

FROM the FARM: Send soldiers overseas a special care package of cake
nation, we have so much to be grateful for, and at times we forget this.

...his hometown church has been sending along clever individual cakes baked in glass Mason jars, which the soldiers really enjoy.

The recipe is especially fascinating for children to share in and enjoy.

Here's what Greg had to say via e-mail: "Due to being stationed at Kandahar, Afghanistan, amenities like cake and ice cream are not common. My sister-in-law and the ladies from her church in Missouri send us cakes in a jar, and recently, we were able to enjoy them with a little ice cream we had hoarded in a staff freezer. What a great surprise for several guys stuck in the middle of the desert!"

While you enjoy this week's recipe, please remember all of our soldiers, past and present, in your thoughts and prayers.

Soldier's Cake in a Jar

1 (18.25-ounce) package cake mix, flavor of choice

8 standard pint canning jars with lids and rings (wide-mouthed jars work best)

DIRECTIONS: Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Prepare cake batter according to package directions. Lightly and evenly spray the inside of each jar with cooking spray. Using a glass measuring cup, carefully pour 1 cup (minus 2 tablespoons) of cake batter into each jar, being careful to keep the rims and sides clean; using a funnel is recommended. Carefully place jars upright on a cookie sheet to prevent tipping. Bake for 30 to 35 minutes or until a cake tester inserted into each cake comes out clean. While cakes are baking, boil jar lids in a pan of water for approximately 10 minutes. Once cakes are finished baking, take one jar out at a time. Carefully cover the mouth of the jar with a hot lid and, using heavy oven mitts, securely twist on the jar ring. Place jars on the counter to cool. When the jar lids "ping," they are sealed. As the cakes cool, they will slightly pull away from the sides of the jars.

NOTE: Do not frost the cakes in the jars before sealing them. If desired, send along a plastic tub of premade cake frosting. Also be sure to send forks, napkins and candles (if it's the soldier's birthday). The cakes in the sealed jars will remain fresh for about 3 months.

The opinions expressed are solely those of the writer. He can be reached at [email protected] or 219.852.4327.



http://www.nwitimes.com/lifestyles/food-and-cooking/article_79193f4b-690f-5d47-91a6-9a978933e44e.html

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