Free/discounted Cakes For Hobart N50?? Should I?

Decorating By cupcakesnbuttercream Updated 25 Jan 2011 , 1:55am by cownsj

cupcakesnbuttercream Posted 25 Jan 2011 , 12:07am
post #1 of 8

Hello,
I found someone selling a used Hobart N50. From the pictures, it seems to be in very good condition.
Obviously, those mixers are very expensive! icon_eek.gif but, the seller presented me with an offer: a little less than half of his original asking price + a birthday cake for his son next month + a "good price" on a wedding cake for a family member(that part made me laugh a little).

I just wanted to hear from others on what they think....

7 replies
cownsj Posted 25 Jan 2011 , 12:20am
post #2 of 8

I think you probably need to do a bit of homework on this one. One, find out more on the Hobart, and go physically check it out, determine it's true value. Find out what he has in mind for the birthday cake (he may want a 3D, 5 tier topsy turvey with 100 handsculpted characters on it, and DEFINITELY find out more in regard to the wedding cake. The value there can vary sooooo much. Even if the "value" weighs in his favor some, it may still be a good deal for you if you are cash strapped, but don't be taken advantage of either. And most of all, have all of it spelled out clearly in writing, and signed by you both, and have him sign off on each cake as well.

foxymomma521 Posted 25 Jan 2011 , 12:20am
post #3 of 8

I think you'd have to set a limit on how much work you'd be doing for free...

cupcakesnbuttercream Posted 25 Jan 2011 , 12:31am
post #4 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by cownsj

I think you probably need to do a bit of homework on this one. One, find out more on the Hobart, and go physically check it out, determine it's true value. Find out what he has in mind for the birthday cake (he may want a 3D, 5 tier topsy turvey with 100 handsculpted characters on it, and DEFINITELY find out more in regard to the wedding cake. The value there can vary sooooo much. Even if the "value" weighs in his favor some, it may still be a good deal for you if you are cash strapped, but don't be taken advantage of either. And most of all, have all of it spelled out clearly in writing, and signed by you both, and have him sign off on each cake as well.




Definitely great advice...thanks so much!

and yes, $800-$900 for a mixer is definitely out of my price range! I would have to find out EXACTLY what he's looking for with the birthday cake and all and add up costs to see if it's really worth it.

As far as the wedding cake goes......I have NO IDEA where to start with that icon_confused.gif

cownsj Posted 25 Jan 2011 , 12:46am
post #5 of 8

For the wedding cake, you can tell him you need to do a "free" consult with the happy couple..... and work from there.

Toptier Posted 25 Jan 2011 , 1:12am
post #6 of 8

Instead of an open-ended offer, why don't you say you have $xx in "cake credit" with you that you will apply to the birthday cake and wedding cake, whatever amount that you determine is fair. This is the fairest way to do it - you also need to make sure that you're available for the dates in question and that the credit will be valid for these dates or a mutually acceptable later date.

cupcakesnbuttercream Posted 25 Jan 2011 , 1:36am
post #7 of 8

Thanks, cownsj

Toptier, that is a great idea. I'm thinking a credit that covers the remaining balance of their asking price. (Should I subtract the estimated cost of supplies?)
They can use part of the credit for the birthday cake, and the remaining balance would be applied to the wedding cake. Thanks again! that helps so much!

cownsj Posted 25 Jan 2011 , 1:55am
post #8 of 8

I think you need to figure the cost of what they would pay if they walked into your shop to purchase the cake. You can offer a bit more of the value (essentially giving up some or all of your profit), if you feel that is what will work to help secure the deal for you. Plus, keep in mind when working with them that they may think that the price for your cakes is "subjective" if they don't know how to price a cake, plus any bells and whistles. But that can all be worked out when you negotiate it with them. First, be sure of the condition of the Hobart, and check out it's value independent of what they are telling you it's worth, while being careful that no one in your area knows it's available and can outbid you on it.

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