Damask Stencil Question

Decorating By Lkfarkas Updated 9 Sep 2011 , 7:17pm by CarolWI

Lkfarkas Posted 23 Jan 2011 , 2:58pm
post #1 of 11

I've seen the tutorials on the stencil for 1 stencil (like a square cake side), but when the stencil is repeated, and they're butted up against eachother, how do you keep them from messing up your previous stencil? In other words, how do you get a continuous "wrap" effect w/out screwing up your previous stencil?

10 replies
pattycakesnj Posted 23 Jan 2011 , 3:11pm
post #2 of 11

Either wait for the previous stenciling to dry, or (what I do) is cut the edge of the stencil as close to the design as possible so you can continue without the edge messing up the design

countrygirll Posted 23 Jan 2011 , 11:35pm
post #3 of 11

It's funny you should ask this question because I was thinking the same thing today!

Can anyone offer some suggestions as to how to keep the stencil set on the side of the cake? I too have a damask cake to do in June and have read several ways of handling this. The only one that I think will work is using small sewing pins and pushing them through the stencil and through the cake to hold it in place. I saw something on you tube using some sort of medical tape--but that would only work if you were stenciling only one side.

Any other suggestions? thanks!

grams Posted 24 Jan 2011 , 12:06am
post #4 of 11

When I want to hold a stencil onto the side of a cake I poke a toothpick in tilted against the edge of the open and apply the icing then Hold the stencil in place as I pull out the toothpick and cover the hole it left behing with the stenciling icing.
For a stencil that has to over lap let it dry before overlapping and cutting the stencil as close to the edge also helps. If it has to overlap I also slide a piece of typing paper over the crusted stenciled part and under the overlapping stencil this keeps me from accidently nicking the already stenciled part.

Tee-Y Posted 24 Jan 2011 , 12:07am
post #5 of 11

I use sewing pins i.e the ones with coloured heads to hold my stencil on the cake sides but I first prick holes in the stencil before pinning to the cake so as not to press the cake trying to do it directly on the cake. But I only use this method when I want to stiple onto the cake with a brush or foam and not the palette knife and royal icing method that they have in the designer stencil tutorial video. HTH.

robinmarie Posted 9 Sep 2011 , 11:33am
post #6 of 11

If you cut the stencil to get the match up from what you have already done, dosen't that destroy the stencil if you wanted to re-use it again for a different cake?

Chellescakes Posted 9 Sep 2011 , 11:39am
post #7 of 11

use masking tape to hold the stencil on , it doesn[t mark the icing. and comes off easy

psurrette Posted 9 Sep 2011 , 12:06pm
post #8 of 11

if your doing it on a fondant cake you can use a very thin layer of shortning to hold the stencil on the cake

tal Posted 9 Sep 2011 , 6:03pm
post #9 of 11

I've been reading this board. I realize that you need a crusting BC to stencil, but no matter what I've tried, even after refrig for hours, my stencils stick, but it looks soooo messy after I pull it off!

I am doing a first wedding cake in Nov and practicing with this technique and I am a MESS!!!

Can someone please help me figure out how to make this stencil come off cleaner????

thank you!

feel free to email me at talobx@verizon.net
lisa L

mariacakestoo Posted 9 Sep 2011 , 6:15pm
post #10 of 11

The shortening trick for sure. But am I the only one whose RI is bone dry by the time I get the stencil washed and patted dry for the next application? Must be lucky.

CarolWI Posted 9 Sep 2011 , 7:17pm
post #11 of 11

I bought mylar sheets and plan to cut my own stencils so I can have them as long/big as I need. Will be trying one next month to see how it works...crossing my fingers!

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