What Size Are These Tiers?

Decorating By Rainyvv Updated 22 Jan 2011 , 2:17pm by leah_s

Rainyvv Posted 22 Jan 2011 , 4:08am
post #1 of 17

The longer I look at the pic the more I confuse myself icon_cry.gif Thanks!

First time trying to attach pic no luck.

Here is the link
http://www.weddingflowersguru.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/02/brown-wedding-cake.jpg

16 replies
leily Posted 22 Jan 2011 , 4:15am
post #2 of 17

can't tell you the exact sizes, but it looks like a 4" difference between each tier. Plus the top edge is rounded on each tier so it's another optical ollusion to make it seem bigger.

FromScratchSF Posted 22 Jan 2011 , 4:17am
post #3 of 17

I'm guessing 6x9x12x15. Anyone else?

leily Posted 22 Jan 2011 , 4:25am
post #4 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by FromScratchSF

I'm guessing 6x9x12x15. Anyone else?




With the flowers on there it can be deceiving i was thinking 4-8-12-16, otherwise 6-10-14-18, but again i think there is a 4" difference between tiers instead of 3

Rainyvv Posted 22 Jan 2011 , 4:37am
post #5 of 17

Thanks! I was also thinking 6-9-12-15 but now that you mention it I think it is a 4 inch difference......I would have to buy all new cake pans icon_cry.gif I don't think I can get away with 3 inch difference. Since that is what they like about the cake

leily Posted 22 Jan 2011 , 4:41am
post #6 of 17

how many people do you need the cake to feed? That's what you need to know first, then you can adjust the sizes as needed.

Rainyvv Posted 22 Jan 2011 , 4:46am
post #7 of 17

Well the cake is for a friend and she needs 250 servings. I told her 6-9-12-15 for 155 servings and i would make 2, 12 inch for 90 to total 245. But the more I look at the cake I wonder about the sizes. icon_eek.gif I don't do this as a business which is why I would have to purchase new pans to do 4 inch increments.

leily Posted 22 Jan 2011 , 5:13am
post #8 of 17

what size pans do you have? maybe we can help make something work

Kitagrl Posted 22 Jan 2011 , 5:15am
post #9 of 17

Pretty sure its 16/12/8/4.

The top is pretty easy to tell its quite small, it only has like 3 flowers on it and its being dwarfed by them. Then just go up in increments of 4" (there is about a 2" lip on each tier.)

Rainyvv Posted 22 Jan 2011 , 5:15am
post #10 of 17

I have 6-9-12 and was just going to buy a 15

Kitagrl Posted 22 Jan 2011 , 5:18am
post #11 of 17

I'm sure that will work just fine! The ledge on those tiers is definitely a 4" (2" around) ledge...so the 3" ledge will look smaller, especially once you get the border on. In your mind's eye, remove the border out of the photo and you can tell the ledge is a healthy 2" all the way around (or 4" total). So with the odd numbered pans, you will have a slightly smaller ledge than the photo shows.

Rainyvv Posted 22 Jan 2011 , 5:25am
post #12 of 17

Thanks for the help. I think I will have to go with the 4" to get the same feel. Didn't want to get new pans.

FromScratchSF Posted 22 Jan 2011 , 5:38am
post #13 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rainyvv

Well the cake is for a friend and she needs 250 servings. I told her 6-9-12-15 for 155 servings and i would make 2, 12 inch for 90 to total 245. But the more I look at the cake I wonder about the sizes. icon_eek.gif I don't do this as a business which is why I would have to purchase new pans to do 4 inch increments.




icon_eek.gif You are a brave, brave woman to tackle a cake that size without being a professional - My tip, keep in mind the size of the oven you are baking in, if it's a standard at-home oven it probably won't fit a pan larger then 15".

If this problem applies to you, Fat Daddio (not my favorite pan company) makes 1/2 rounds pans that will fit in the home oven to get the size you need.
[url]
http://www.fatdaddios.com/half_round_set.htm[/url]

Sincerely, good luck!

Rainyvv Posted 22 Jan 2011 , 5:48am
post #14 of 17

Had not thought about the oven. I'll have to go back to 6 9 12 15. Half rounds sound intimidating. I have my doubts everyone around me says u can do it.....geez having 2nd thoughts again. Gonna sleep it off for now.

FromScratchSF Posted 22 Jan 2011 , 6:16am
post #15 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rainyvv

Had not thought about the oven. I'll have to go back to 6 9 12 15. Half rounds sound intimidating. I have my doubts everyone around me says u can do it.....geez having 2nd thoughts again. Gonna sleep it off for now.




They actually work pretty well, it makes them easier to cook, you don't need a heat core so they bake nicely, easier to cool because you don't need a monster sized cooling rack (and flipping out a full round that size is intimidating), and easier to torte because they are not the full round so less worries about breaking you layers. I kind of prefer using them over a full round because I'm lazy, paranoid, and space is an issue where I bake out of.

Just weigh the batter you put in the pan to make sure your 2 batches weigh the same and they should come out just fine. My only complaint are the rounded edges, like all Fat Daddio pans, but since you are baking a rounded-edged cake, you have nothing to worry about.

I say go for it!

CWR41 Posted 22 Jan 2011 , 6:20am
post #16 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by leily

...otherwise 6-10-14-18, but again i think there is a 4" difference between tiers instead of 3




I agree with leily. These sizes would also get you at least the 250 servings required... it would serve at least 276 although you could quite possibly get 300 servings from it. The 18" alone would serve 148 (according to the old Wilton chart). The 18" half round pan is 3" deep and would look best if it's taller than the rest of the tiers. You don't want it to look short and squatty... as the base, it should look massive, strong, and supportive to appear proportionate.

leah_s Posted 22 Jan 2011 , 2:17pm
post #17 of 17

Those edges almost look like they were baked in the contour pans. I love that look.

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