Dayti Posted 20 Jan 2011 , 5:21pm
post #1 of

So, what's the trick to icing these little 2" round cakes with fondant?? I have so far tried:
Ganache under the fondant
BC under the fondant
Icing the little cake first
Putting the BC straight on the fondant before applying
Cutting a 5"ish circle (too hard to get rid of the excess/folds)
Cutting a 2 1/4" circle for the top and a strip to wrap around the sides.

I have each little cake stuck to a 3" card circle with ganache. But they are so light, as soon as you touch them they just fall off the board, or start to slide around if you touch the sides and work their way loose.
They look terrible. But I really don't want to be dipping them either, I wanted a clean fondant look. Help please icon_cry.gif

28 replies
cakeandpartygirl Posted 20 Jan 2011 , 5:48pm
post #2 of

I have found that if I put them on an 8 in cake board and stick them with a little icing underneath to attach it to the board it helps a lot but they are still a pain!!

LisaPeps Posted 20 Jan 2011 , 5:51pm
post #3 of

I saw on fabulous cakes season 1 episode 7, at 25 mins in them doing small cakes. What they have is a set like this http://210.8.91.152/~iceda589/store/images/Sil%20large%20round%20-%20b.JPG. They line the sides and bottom of it with buttercream, put layers of cake in it (circles a little bit smaller than the tin cut out of a sheet layer) then layers of filling then cake again then a final layer of buttercream on top. Chill until the buttercream is set. Then use the heat of your hands to warm it slightly to get it out of the tin. Then cover in fondant.

I found that episode really informative... it shows sugar blowing and pulling as well. I would suggest buying it on itunes or something.

HTH

metria Posted 20 Jan 2011 , 5:58pm
post #4 of

you said you didn't want to be dipping them, do you mean you don't want to use a poured fondant?

cakeandpartygirl Posted 20 Jan 2011 , 6:08pm
post #5 of

Oh yeah my cakes are iced in buttercream but I also made sure that the cake was cold!!

artscallion Posted 20 Jan 2011 , 6:10pm
post #6 of

I'm saving this thread so I can link to it every time someone starts a thread asking, "Just got an order for 300 mini cakes. How much should I charge?
and then doesn't believe us when we say they're a giant PIA and they should charge $25 each.

cakeandpartygirl Posted 20 Jan 2011 , 6:20pm
post #7 of

Oh yeah they are a pain to do!! I am attaching a link of ones that I did. They are about 3 in. I used rolled fondant and they are iced in whipped ganache. I have another picture but I can't upload it (they are on another computer).
http://s1232.photobucket.com/albums/ff362/cakeandpartygirl/

Try this and see if it works: http://s1232.photobucket.com/albums/ff362/cakeandpartygirl/

Dayti Posted 20 Jan 2011 , 6:45pm
post #8 of

Thanks everyone. I did see that episode of Fabulous Cakes, but had forgotten they used that method icon_redface.gif The link to the set you posted doesn't work, but I used the mini-cake set from Silverwood (Squires Kitchen). If I line the little tins with BC, the pieces of cake to go in them would be minute I think. I also remember from that show that after they did like 300 of them, they had to re-ice lots because the BC wasn't even all the way round.

I thought it would be easier than it really is, goodness knows why. I will persevere, it's only for my own use, not for an order, since I bought the tins ages ago and didn't ever get round to using them. Thought they would be cute, which they will be IF I can manage to decorate them nicely...

Texas_Rose Posted 20 Jan 2011 , 6:57pm
post #9 of

I only frost the tops with buttercream, then freeze them solid and cover with fondant the next day. Sometimes you'll have to use two thin layers of fondant to get it smooth looking. I put them on a plastic tray when I'm covering them, then transfer them to a board or wrapper afterwards. Only take one or two out of the freezer at a time. They'll start to look dewy as the cake thaws, but the moisture will evaporate after an hour or two.

sewsugarqueen Posted 20 Jan 2011 , 6:57pm

dayti,
so glad you posted the info on those mini cakes and what a pain they are. I wanted to do them for the place I work at.... on second thought I'll just do cupcakes or cookies. I so want to learn how to do them but can't see any market in my area. No one will pay 4-5$ for a single mini. So I guess I'll concentrate on some other new items.
If you do figure a shortcut could you post it please.

brincess_b Posted 20 Jan 2011 , 7:05pm

It can help to cover with marzipan first too.
I am not a mini cake person, I think it takes patience and tactics to get the knack for a smooth finish. So I would go for the homestyle poured fondant instead!
xx

cylstrial Posted 20 Jan 2011 , 7:13pm

Do you put little cake boards under the bottom tier (like you would a normal cake)?

CWR41 Posted 20 Jan 2011 , 7:36pm

I couldn't do it... I don't have enough patience, and nobody has enough green to pay me to do it!

Poured fondant is the only way I'd consider it...
http://www.mahalo.com/how-to-make-petit-fours

cakeandpartygirl Posted 20 Jan 2011 , 7:48pm

I know when I iced them I used the same method as I would if I were doing a larger cake. I used a larger tip than the one's that you would use for basketweave. It's the wilton 2B. I ice the top first and then do the sides. I smooth it with a bench scraper and do the edges as usual to get them crisp. (Sharon's method). Call me crazy but it took about 5 min to ice one. Of course they would be expensive to sell. Truthfully I enjoyed it!!!

Dayti Posted 20 Jan 2011 , 8:19pm

But HOW do you ice them without them sliding around? I understand using an icing bag rather than a spatula to crumb coat, but then using the bench scraper was hopeless for me! And using the smoother on the fondant too. I had them glued to the board, tried ganache and BC to glue, but they still moved. These things when bare weigh less than 2oz, they use the same amount of batter as a cupcake. I thought I would try and sell them for a bit more than a cupcake, like â¬3.00 (my cupcakes are â¬2.50) but it's not going to be worth it for this much hassle I think!
Tomorrow I will try icing just the top and freezing/chilling after, before covering in 2 thin layers of fondant, as Texasrose suggest. Thoroughly teed off with the whole process at the moment.

cakeandpartygirl Posted 20 Jan 2011 , 9:23pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dayti

But HOW do you ice them without them sliding around? I understand using an icing bag rather than a spatula to crumb coat, but then using the bench scraper was hopeless for me! And using the smoother on the fondant too. I had them glued to the board, tried ganache and BC to glue, but they still moved. These things when bare weigh less than 2oz, they use the same amount of batter as a cupcake. I thought I would try and sell them for a bit more than a cupcake, like â¬3.00 (my cupcakes are â¬2.50) but it's not going to be worth it for this much hassle I think!
Tomorrow I will try icing just the top and freezing/chilling after, before covering in 2 thin layers of fondant, as Texasrose suggest. Thoroughly teed off with the whole process at the moment.




I put them on an 8 in cake board!!

cheatize Posted 20 Jan 2011 , 11:53pm

How does an 8 inch cake board keep them from sliding around? Doesn't it just have farther to slide?

I've done very few of these. I use a thinner icing, stick a skewer through the middle into the board for me to hold onto (I remove it later), slap on a messy coat, refrigerate until stiff, and then smooth quickly the best I can.

cakeandpartygirl Posted 21 Jan 2011 , 12:03am

I don't know why but each cake is on it's own board and then I kinda glue it on to the larger board with a little icing. I hold the board with my hand while I am icing. It's kinda hard to explain but this is what I found works for me.

mindy1204 Posted 21 Jan 2011 , 12:13am

I have thinking of trying these but using poured fondant recipe. It would just be for practice, has anyone done it with poured fondant?

cylstrial Posted 21 Jan 2011 , 3:42am
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakeandpartygirl

I don't know why but each cake is on it's own board and then I kinda glue it on to the larger board with a little icing. I hold the board with my hand while I am icing. It's kinda hard to explain but this is what I found works for me.




So did you have to hand cut each mini board? Or can you buy those somewhere?

imagenthatnj Posted 21 Jan 2011 , 4:51am

Do you have to cover them with fondant? There are bakeries out there successfully selling them just covered with buttercream, or maybe with a chocolate wrap (you could even do a fondant wrap, just the sides and leave the top covered with buttercream, or make a separate cover for the top (a circle of fondant).

Also, for the bottom, I wouldn't do a mini board, I would cut a round of fondant/gumpaste and let it dry and use that as the bottom board. I think that's easier than cutting board circles?

http://cakemonkey.com/menu

They're pretty expensive everywhere because of all the work involved, though.

I know Mich Turner has a lot of those in her books, but I think she sells them in London for about $15 or $20 each!

http://www.lvcc.co.uk/price-list.asp

imagenthatnj Posted 21 Jan 2011 , 4:59am

More ideas; I had forgotten about the queen of them all, Cupcakeenvy; maybe you could look for youtube videos or go to her blog?

http://www.cakejournal.com/archives/mini-cakes

http://www.flickr.com/photos/cupcakeenvy/3508628491/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/abccakeshopnm/3943014603/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/whipped/sets/72157605945909485/with/2631300995/

cheatize Posted 21 Jan 2011 , 5:48am

I think that moisture would soften gumpaste or fondant if used as a board. Then you'd have a floppy board and they would be very difficult to move around.

cylstrial Posted 21 Jan 2011 , 1:11pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by imagenthatnj


Also, for the bottom, I wouldn't do a mini board, I would cut a round of fondant/gumpaste and let it dry and use that as the bottom board. I think that's easier than cutting board circles?




That would be so much easier!

cakeandpartygirl Posted 21 Jan 2011 , 2:48pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by cylstrial

Quote:
Originally Posted by cakeandpartygirl

I don't know why but each cake is on it's own board and then I kinda glue it on to the larger board with a little icing. I hold the board with my hand while I am icing. It's kinda hard to explain but this is what I found works for me.



So did you have to hand cut each mini board? Or can you buy those somewhere?



Unfortunately I hand cut the board. That was what the pain in the derriere came in. I also put them on another board which could be purchased but so far I have only seen them in round for the most reasonable at brpboxshop. They were silver also. I have found a square 4 in board at the blocked website but they were 1.25 each.

cylstrial Posted 21 Jan 2011 , 4:43pm

Thanks for your help! That's good to know!

imagenthatnj Posted 21 Jan 2011 , 5:07pm

This person covers the bottom in fondant, so as not to get those mini boards, or cut anything.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=13-_4A0v2QU

Another idea.

Dayti Posted 21 Jan 2011 , 6:08pm

I haven't had time to have another go at these today in the end, but I will definitely try a mix of the methods and ideas. Thank you all so much.
I like those mini-cakes in that Australian lady's video, love the little fondant base ESPECIALLY if you don't have to mess around cutting card!

ElaineKay Posted 15 May 2013 , 8:57am

I agree, these are the biggest pain, I have done a few wedding cake orders for these.

 

There is no quick way, you earn your money on these, one thing to say though is I always use 2 smoothers.

 

  1. First cover the cakes in buttercream (spit and fill first if you wish)
  2.  Refrigerate in sealed containers or bags.
  3. Start with the coldest first
  4. Roll out your circle, don´t do it too small, you are just making yourself more hard work, just be careful not to get the buttercream on the icing you trim off (you can even trim it off the offcuts).
  5. Take them out, no more than 1 to 3 at at a time, depending how quick you are.
  6. Place the sugar paste on top, and flatten the top, then use your hands to smooth down the sides first.
  7. Then take your two smoothers and roll the cake between on the work surface until you get a smooth finish.  You need to do this gently, not too much pressure.
  8. Place on your (painstaking cut and covered premade) cakeboards, or whatever you want to use, you could try greasproof paper?
  9. Put them immediately in an airtight container until you finish the decoration, because they will be there a long time before you finish and they will dry out otherwise!

 

Here is a link to some I made http://celebrationcakesmallorca.net/weddings_cup.php

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