How Do You Cap A Cake With Fondant And A Scallaped Edge?

Decorating By Kceyp Updated 14 Jan 2011 , 5:38pm by holliellen

Kceyp Posted 11 Jan 2011 , 8:16pm
post #1 of 21

My cousin has asked me to do a cake for her daughters birthday the cake is 3 layers. The top of each layer is covered about a 1/4 of the way down with fondant then the edge is scallaped. How would I do this cap with the fondant edge should I cut the scalap first or after it is on the cake?
Should I just cover the whole cake in fondant as if I am leaving it then cut the bottom off?

20 replies
KristyCakes Posted 11 Jan 2011 , 8:50pm
post #2 of 21

I scallop before I put that layer on the top of the cake. Good luck!

BCo Posted 11 Jan 2011 , 9:28pm
post #3 of 21

Do it before - it's super easy. Just take a cake pan that's about a size or two bigger then the size cake you're going to cover. Ex. If you're covering a 6 inch cake use a 8 inch pan as your template. Trace around the 8 inch pan onto wax/parchment paper to make an 8 inch circle. Cut the circle out of the paper. Fold the circle in half then in half again and in half again depending on how big you want your scallop. (it will be sort of a triangle shape at this point) Then take something round (like the edge of a small bowl or some other container/glass that is rounded and smaller. Place the glass at the wide end of your trianle and then come down about a 1/4 of an inch or so, depending again on how you want your scallop to be. Trace around the glass so you have a rounded top to the top of your triangle. You will be cutting this piece off of the wax paper. So go ahead and remove your glass and then cut on the line you just drew to make a rounded edge. So now your triangle will look like a cone shape with a rounded top. Then unfold your template and wa-la....you have a scalloped overlay template! Just place this on your rolled out fondant and use a knife to cut around the template then place your scalloped piece of fondant onto the top of your cake.

Gosh I hope that all made sense!! icon_smile.gif Let me know if you need me to clarify something!

sccandwbfan Posted 12 Jan 2011 , 1:45pm
post #4 of 21

Bturpin, I was just checking this thread out because I like to read them all and that seems like a great way to do that. I have an added question. I tried to make a cake similiar to one of this website that was a snow scene with cut out snowmen and trees. The top of the cake was covered similiarly to the scalloped only it was wavy. Are you supposed to put something over the cake to make it stick to the cake? Or will gravity hold it in place?

Thanks,

Christy

Dani1081 Posted 12 Jan 2011 , 2:00pm
post #5 of 21

I tried to do this a week ago on a cake and I cut the scallops before I put the fondant on. As I was smoothing it over the edges, the scallops got completely distorted, so I ended up cutting them again on the cake. It was very difficult to do this due to the angle and trying not to mess up the buttercream, but it turned out ok. I\\'m wondering if my fondant had been thicker or if I had let is \\"set up\\" a few minutes if it would have worked better?

Karen421 Posted 12 Jan 2011 , 2:25pm
post #6 of 21

I just did this last week and I made a template similar to how Bturpin described. Her instructions are a good way to do it. I used a circle cookie cutter to trace, to get my scallops, then cut it out and used piping gel on top of the cake to adhere it. icon_smile.gif

BCo Posted 12 Jan 2011 , 3:12pm
post #7 of 21

[quote=\\"sccandwbfan\\"]Bturpin, I was just checking this thread out because I like to read them all and that seems like a great way to do that. I have an added question. I tried to make a cake similiar to one of this website that was a snow scene with cut out snowmen and trees. The top of the cake was covered similiarly to the scalloped only it was wavy. Are you supposed to put something over the cake to make it stick to the cake? Or will gravity hold it in place?

Thanks,

Christy[/quote]

I would brush the top of the cake with a little water or piping gel to hold it in place.

BCo Posted 12 Jan 2011 , 3:14pm
post #8 of 21

[quote=\\"Dani1081\\"]I tried to do this a week ago on a cake and I cut the scallops before I put the fondant on. As I was smoothing it over the edges, the scallops got completely distorted, so I ended up cutting them again on the cake. It was very difficult to do this due to the angle and trying not to mess up the buttercream, but it turned out ok. I\\\\\\'m wondering if my fondant had been thicker or if I had let is \\\\\\"set up\\\\\\" a few minutes if it would have worked better?[/quote]

I tend to go a little thicker on the overlay - I just think it holds its shape a little better. And when you place it on top of the cake let the scallops fall onto the sides and gently press the scallops down onto the cake, too much pressure and they will get distorted, but I think the thicker piece of fondant should help with that some.

sullymel13 Posted 12 Jan 2011 , 3:15pm
post #9 of 21

Bturpin - your explanation was very clear, and it was like a light bulb went off in my head! Thanks to the OP who asked the question! Now I need an excuse to try it!

Kceyp Posted 12 Jan 2011 , 7:34pm
post #10 of 21

Bturpin, Thank you very much I under stand the directions perfectly I am deff. going to try this way! Thanks again

BCo Posted 12 Jan 2011 , 9:29pm
post #11 of 21

no problem! glad to help

soupercb Posted 13 Jan 2011 , 2:11am
post #12 of 21

This topic caught my eye, because i have been wanting to try one of these also. I have one more question...do you cover your whole cake in the bottom color of fondant and then place the scalloped overlay on top of that? Thanks!

BCo Posted 13 Jan 2011 , 2:15am
post #13 of 21

Yes, cover your whole cake in the bottom color and then put the overlay on top!

Bluehue Posted 13 Jan 2011 , 2:25am
post #14 of 21

Bturpin

You explained that as clear as water - ask CC powers to be to make it a *sticky* for future reference.


Bluehue.

Bonnell Posted 13 Jan 2011 , 2:40am
post #15 of 21

I have been trying to figure out how to do this. Thank you so much for the wonderful explanation Bturpin!

mrsbriggs06 Posted 13 Jan 2011 , 2:47am
post #16 of 21

thanks! great explanation!

Dani1081 Posted 13 Jan 2011 , 2:55am
post #17 of 21

Bturpin, I will definitely make it thicker next time - thanks!

johnson6ofus Posted 13 Jan 2011 , 3:18am
post #18 of 21

A round of applause from me too- I GET IT! Thanks for the tip! icon_biggrin.gif

srkmilklady Posted 13 Jan 2011 , 3:42am
post #19 of 21

I have to give this a try too. Great instructions, but is there a trick to getting the overlay on so that it is centred properly and the scalloped edge is even all the way down and around the cake? icon_confused.gif

Dayti Posted 13 Jan 2011 , 3:33pm
post #20 of 21

I would also love to know how this look is achieved!! Do you think she covered in white, made a pattern on paper and cut out the bottom piece, and with the same pattern made the green piece and stuck it in the gap?
Image
elegant wedding cake by www.fortheloveofcake.ca, on Flickr

holliellen Posted 14 Jan 2011 , 5:38pm
post #21 of 21

I'm not a pro or anything even close but it looks to me like they covered the cake in white fondant or buttercream and then used some kind of stencil to cut out the green (as they are all the same shape exactly) and then wrapped that around the bottom of each tier and then went back and put on the piping. I could be wrong tho!

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