Fellow Bakers In Colorado, Please Read!!

Decorating By Luv4Luna Updated 11 Jan 2011 , 4:58am by KakesbyKris

Luv4Luna Posted 11 Jan 2011 , 1:02am
post #1 of 5

Hi all, I am moving from New Jersey to Colorado on March 4th. I have never had to adjust how I bake for altitude and I wanted to know if there is some kind of golden rule or trick that I can use to bake a great cake at high altitude? I don't know if different parts of the state matter, but I'll be living about an hour outside of Denver. Any tips or suggestions on how to accomodate the altitude would be very much appreciated! Thank you!! icon_smile.gif

4 replies
Elcee Posted 11 Jan 2011 , 2:42am
post #2 of 5

Welcome to our beautiful state! The first thing you'll need to do is find out what the actual altitude is where you'll be living. There could be a big difference depending on which direction that hour is in icon_smile.gif. High altitude is anything over 3500 ft; I'm at around 6300.

At the most basic level, you'll need to:
decrease sugar by 2 tbs per cup
increase liquid by 2 tbs per cup
decrease leavening by 1/4 tsp per tsp

When using a cake mix (straight or doctored) add 1/4 cup of flour and increase liquid as stated above even if the box says you don't need to icon_wink.gif.

It also helps to separate your eggs; beat the whites to stiff peaks; fold them into the batter at the end. I don't always do this, just sometimes.

Bake at a slightly lower temp (325) for a slightly shorter time. If a recipe says 35-40 minutes, I start checking at 25 minutes.

Keep in mind that water boils at a lower temperature here too. Add liquid to cook rice. Pasta and other stuff doesn't matter as much. Adjustments do need to be made for candy making.

I hope I didn't make this sound too complicated, it's second nature to me now and it'll get that way for you, too. If you run into any problems, feel free to contact me via PM or email!

KakesbyKris Posted 11 Jan 2011 , 3:08am
post #3 of 5

Welcome!

I am at 4600 ft. I use the WASC. recipes. When I was having issues with my cakes sinking, I was given this advice....


Rose Levy Beranbaum (author of The Cake Bible) suggests adding an extra egg at high altitudes.

I have done that with my last couple of cakes and although they did not sink, they also didn't seem to rise as high as I would like.

Elcee- Would you add the extra 1/4 cup flour and water on top of what you are already doctoring the mix with? So for the WASC (1/2 recipe) I would add 1 1/4 cup of flour, decrease the sugar by 2 tbsp, and increase the liquid by 2 tbsp? I use to bake at the 325 and it took longer for me, to where I didn't bother checking until 35 mins.

Hope I am not hijacking the post icon_redface.gif

Elcee Posted 11 Jan 2011 , 3:33am
post #4 of 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by KakesbyKris

Elcee- Would you add the extra 1/4 cup flour and water on top of what you are already doctoring the mix with? So for the WASC (1/2 recipe) I would add 1 1/4 cup of flour, decrease the sugar by 2 tbsp, and increase the liquid by 2 tbsp? I use to bake at the 325 and it took longer for me, to where I didn't bother checking until 35 mins.

Hope I am not hijacking the post icon_redface.gif




Kris, that's exactly how I make my cake mix extender. I wonder if the difference in baking time is due to the difference in our altitudes? The higher you are the faster they bake icon_smile.gif?

Much of what I've learned about high altitude baking is from the book Chocolate Snowball by Lettie Halloran Flatt who is the executive pastry chef at Deer Valley Resort in Utah (7200 ft). Nowhere does she recommend adding an egg. I know Rose Levy Beranbaum wrote the (cake) bible and all but, JMHO, I'll stick with advice from someone who lives and bakes at high altitude icon_smile.gif.

KakesbyKris Posted 11 Jan 2011 , 4:58am
post #5 of 5

Thanks Elcee! I love the caking side, but am not much of a baker. I've changed recipes several times, just haven't found that fool proof one yet. thanks for the tips!

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%