Do You Cut The 'crust' Off Your Cakes?

Decorating By zespri Updated 4 Jan 2011 , 7:41pm by Claire138

zespri Posted 4 Jan 2011 , 6:53am
post #1 of 18

Before you ice, do you remove the 'crust' from your cakes? I'm not talking about the top, which I think most people level off.

If so, what method/tools do you use?

17 replies
CWR41 Posted 4 Jan 2011 , 7:13am
post #2 of 18

If you're talking about a little crusted edge, yes... I cut it off with scissors.
(about the top, I never remove it... it's already level and I ice the top--no crumbs to deal with if you don't cut off the "skin"!)

playingwithsugar Posted 4 Jan 2011 , 7:46am
post #3 of 18

Never. I collar my cakes, so the parchment holds the moisture on the sides of the cake while cooling.

Theresa icon_smile.gif

zespri Posted 4 Jan 2011 , 7:48am
post #4 of 18

when you say 'collar', do you mean you line the cake tin with paper, and leave it on while the cake cools?

Quote:
Originally Posted by playingwithsugar

Never. I collar my cakes, so the parchment holds the moisture on the sides of the cake while cooling.

Theresa icon_smile.gif


playingwithsugar Posted 4 Jan 2011 , 7:53am
post #5 of 18

Yes, I line both the bottom and sides of my tins. For those have any questions on how to do this, there's a tutorial in the articles section of CC.

Theresa icon_smile.gif

leily Posted 4 Jan 2011 , 1:36pm
post #6 of 18

I don't cut the darker part around the outside off of my cake. When you say crust that makes me think of hard edges, if you have hard edges it sounds like you are over baking your cake just to get the middle done, you may want to lower your oven temp and bake for a longer time.

-K8memphis Posted 4 Jan 2011 , 1:47pm
post #7 of 18

Yes. After the cake is assembled and before icing I take a long beautiful cake knife my son got me and I 'shave' the brown stuff off the edges of the cake--Put the filled cake on my turntable, put a sheet pan next to the turntable under the cake--shave downward in narrow strips.

I take as much of the 'brown' off the cake as I can. It also helps the icing slide on well too--well worth the extra effort in my book.

sherry_lyn Posted 4 Jan 2011 , 2:10pm
post #8 of 18

I found that my cakes were only darker using Fat Daddio or Wilton pans. My cakes baked in Magic Line pans are barely "browned". I had only bought a few FD because my local store had started carrying them, but as soon as I did a side by side comparison I got rid of them & I'll stick with ML. (side note, store only has ML now). I don't trim anything off, only cutting I do is to level. And I parchment the bottoms, but not the sides of my pans too.

drakegore Posted 4 Jan 2011 , 2:23pm
post #9 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by playingwithsugar

Yes, I line both the bottom and sides of my tins. For those have any questions on how to do this, there's a tutorial in the articles section of CC.

Theresa icon_smile.gif




Theresa,
do you feel using the parchment collar protects your sides from browning/crusting differently that the insulating protection bake-easy strips provide on the outside of the pan?
thanks!
Diane

Bluehue Posted 4 Jan 2011 , 2:24pm
post #10 of 18

Never have, never need too - just like playingwithsugar - i line all my tins bottom and sides.
It only takes 1 minute to line a tin - and for that ammount of time - no bits to carve away. thumbs_up.gificon_smile.gif

Bluehue



Quote:
Originally Posted by playingwithsugar

Yes, I line both the bottom and sides of my tins. For those have any questions on how to do this, there's a tutorial in the articles section of CC.

Theresa icon_smile.gif


-K8memphis Posted 4 Jan 2011 , 2:24pm
post #11 of 18

When you bake a white cake, the outside edge is not white like the center it is a darker color--that's what I am referencing in my previous post. I am not refering to over baking or anything like that. I think this is what the op means.

The word 'crust' is being used to describe the outside of the cake. It is not about the cake needing to be fixed due to crustiness--it's not crusty. It's about making a prettier picture when it's sliced and served on the plate.

All the cakes I bake have an outside edge that's a little different in color and texture to the inside of the cake and I would describe that color as brown (chocolate cake being the exception--it's often the same color)

So that in the sliced cake you only see the inside of the cake and the icing and fillings no brown at all.

edited for typos & (hopefully) clarity.

Bluehue Posted 4 Jan 2011 , 3:42pm
post #12 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by -K8memphis

When you bake a white cake, the outside edge is not white like the center it is a darker color--that's what I am referencing in my previous post. I am not refering to over baking or anything like that. I think this is what the op means.

The word 'crust' is being used to describe the outside of the cake. It is not about the cake needing to be fixed due to crustiness--it's not crusty. It's about making a prettier picture when it's sliced and served on the plate.

All the cakes I bake have an outside edge that's a little different in color and texture to the inside of the cake and I would describe that color as brown (chocolate cake being the exception--it's often the same color)

So that in the sliced cake you only see the inside of the cake and the icing and fillings no brown at all.

edited for typos & (hopefully) clarity....

gottcha K8


Bluehue.
thumbs_up.gif


playingwithsugar Posted 4 Jan 2011 , 4:18pm
post #13 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by drakegore

Quote:
Originally Posted by playingwithsugar

Yes, I line both the bottom and sides of my tins. For those have any questions on how to do this, there's a tutorial in the articles section of CC.

Theresa icon_smile.gif



Theresa,
do you feel using the parchment collar protects your sides from browning/crusting differently that the insulating protection bake-easy strips provide on the outside of the pan?
thanks!
Diane




I tried those strips a couple of times, but found that, for me, they didn't merit the extra expense, as I bake in a 3" deep pan and at a 325F for a longer time. They dried out before the cake was done, therefore providing no insulation at about 3/4 of the baking time.

I leave the parchment on the cake as it is cooling, and that keeps the moisture from escaping through those areas, keeping the sides and bottom from drying.

Theresa icon_smile.gif

drakegore Posted 4 Jan 2011 , 4:33pm
post #14 of 18

thanks theresa!
i think i will give this a try next time (i have consistent crusting problems with one of my cakes not matter what i have tried so far and i'd love not too!).
diane

zespri Posted 4 Jan 2011 , 6:45pm
post #15 of 18

Thanks folks, as always it's interesting reading what you all do. As k8 said, I'm not talking about an overcooked bread-like crust, it was just the best word I could come up with to describe the browning on the outside.

I already line my pans on both the bottom and sides, and still get darker sides. But I would think it would be highly unusual if a basic cake came out exactly the same on the edges as it does on the inside, ovens are designed to cook things from the outside inwards, so unless it was done in a microwave (which does the opposite) then every cake would have a slightly more cooked outer I think.

I'm going to give it a try next time, thanks for the instructions k8!

Claire138 Posted 4 Jan 2011 , 7:05pm
post #16 of 18

I cut off the sides when using a square baking pan bc the one I have is not exactly square and needs leveling.

imagenthatnj Posted 4 Jan 2011 , 7:22pm
post #17 of 18

I've seen people use a fine grater to take the outside browning away. I haven't had the need, but I think that's what I would do. I don't trust myself with a knife for that yet.

Claire138 Posted 4 Jan 2011 , 7:41pm
post #18 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by imagenthatnj

I've seen people use a fine grater to take the outside browning away. I haven't had the need, but I think that's what I would do. I don't trust myself with a knife for that yet.




That's brilliant, I'll try that next time!
Thanks for the idea

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