Why Do You Use Thinner Icing To Flood Cookies?

Baking By shanney54 Updated 3 Jan 2011 , 9:22pm by cownsj

shanney54 Posted 3 Jan 2011 , 8:45pm
post #1 of 11

I feel silly for asking this question. lol But how do you benefit from using a thinner icing? I made cookies this weekend and I just outlined them and then went back and filled it in with the same icing. It seemed to work fine. TIA

10 replies
Julie53 Posted 3 Jan 2011 , 8:53pm
post #2 of 11

From my experience- it is just easier to get the icing to move around... I outline & then put the thinner icing in the center-pick up the cookie move around and there you go! Did you have to spread your around with a spatula or knife? Or maybe you just made it thin enough to do it all the same way... icon_wink.gif

drakegore Posted 3 Jan 2011 , 8:59pm
post #3 of 11

a lot of people use one thickness for both (a slightly thickened flood consistency).

i like to use a stiffer icing for outline because, for me, i feel i have better control. i use the thinner flood because it fills the cookie faster and smooths out faster.

either way works good, it just depends on your preferences and what your fingers feel best with.

diane

shanney54 Posted 3 Jan 2011 , 9:00pm
post #4 of 11

I had it in one of the Wilton squeeze bottles. I just swirled it around and made sure that all of the lines disappeared. How does using thinner icing effect the taste of the cookie? Most of the cookies I've had all the flavor came from the icing. So if the icing is thinner does it make the cookie less sweet?

DaPom Posted 3 Jan 2011 , 9:00pm
post #5 of 11

Using a thinner icing to flood the cookies makes it easier to get an even smooth frosting on the cookies, it also saves a bit of time because the thinner icing is easier to spread and then has some degree of self leveling.
There are some really good videos on YouTube that show different techiques for flooding and using two colors when flooding.
icon_biggrin.gif

drakegore Posted 3 Jan 2011 , 9:05pm
post #6 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by shanney54

I had it in one of the Wilton squeeze bottles. I just swirled it around and made sure that all of the lines disappeared. How does using thinner icing effect the taste of the cookie? Most of the cookies I've had all the flavor came from the icing. So if the icing is thinner does it make the cookie less sweet?





i put my flood icing in bottles too. i use bags/tips for outlining, again because i feel i have better control, and it is harder to get stiffer icing out of a bottle.

does not affect taste. you flavor your icing to suit your tongue before you start.

diane

cownsj Posted 3 Jan 2011 , 9:11pm
post #7 of 11

Making the icing thinner consistency does not change the taste, it's just water and that will evaporate anyway. But, keep in mind that if you make it too thin, when the water evaporates you will have holes in your icing. Found that out the hard way.

shanney54 Posted 3 Jan 2011 , 9:13pm
post #8 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by drakegore

Quote:
Originally Posted by shanney54

I had it in one of the Wilton squeeze bottles. I just swirled it around and made sure that all of the lines disappeared. How does using thinner icing effect the taste of the cookie? Most of the cookies I've had all the flavor came from the icing. So if the icing is thinner does it make the cookie less sweet?




i put my flood icing in bottles too. i use bags/tips for outlining, again because i feel i have better control, and it is harder to get stiffer icing out of a bottle.

does not affect taste. you flavor your icing to suit your tongue before you start.

diane


I didn't know when you added more water, or what not, if it effected the taste is what I meant. Thanks everyone!!! Y'all are awesome! icon_biggrin.gif

drakegore Posted 3 Jan 2011 , 9:16pm
post #9 of 11

there's no one right way icon_smile.gif.

look at geminiRJ's pictures. here cookies are out of this world and she uses just one consistency. whatever works best for you icon_smile.gif

shanney54 Posted 3 Jan 2011 , 9:16pm
post #10 of 11

I haven't heard that before cownsj. I learned something new today, glad I asked!

cownsj Posted 3 Jan 2011 , 9:22pm
post #11 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by shanney54

I haven't heard that before cownsj. I learned something new today, glad I asked!




yw. Of course this was the first time I did cookies, and they were for a friend. NP, I cover some cookies, they look gorgeous. I go to check on the ones I completed a bit later, and here are all these holes in them. They were horrid looking. Of course you can't take the RI off without breaking the cookies, so back to baking more cookies. I'm just thankful I was too tired to cover all the cookies at once. lol I came here to cc to ask what I did wrong. Thankfully, it was only about a dozen cookies, but that still seemed like a ton of work when I wasn't used to doing cookies. But, at least I did learn something from it. and that is always a good thing. And I'm glad I could pass this info along before it happens to somene else.

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