Chef_Stef Posted 3 Jan 2011 , 3:17am
post #1 of

I've always used Toba Garrett's or Colette's or Margaret Braun's fondant recipes, which are all easy and taste great,

BUT, I always find (usually Toba's), that they lack elasticity, and if I add enough gel paste (Americolor or Wilton) color to make anything more than a pastel, they lose all stretch and in fact seem to 'deteriorate' into a cookie-dough consistency that falls apart. ?? Then I'm running out to buy it anyway.

Anyone have the secret ingredient I'm missing? Is it a gum tragacanth or something? I hate buying fondant at retail prices, when I can make it AND it tastes better, but I have to have it more reliable for stretch.
Thanks!

21 replies
tryingcake Posted 3 Jan 2011 , 3:45am
post #2 of

I'm hoping you get responses that confirm my post or tell me I'm way off base. It "seems" like I read adding glycerin (the stuff you buy to thin out coloring gels) makes it more flexible.

Someone? Anyone?

tryingcake Posted 3 Jan 2011 , 3:47am
post #3 of

OK - just Googled it - yes - they are adding 1 tablespoon to a regular recipe of MMF.

Chef_Stef Posted 3 Jan 2011 , 4:20am
post #4 of

I don't make mmf, I'm making regular rolled fondant, and it already has glycerine, corn syrup (or glucose), and gelatine...just wondering if there's another ingredient to add, or more of something so I don't get the crumbling effect from a once-stretchy batch of fondant when I add color?

It starts out fine and works ok, then after working it awhile or adding color, it's like it's been overworked, and it begins to fall apart.

And...not always...but often enough that I'm wishing for a more reliable recipe.

tryingcake Posted 3 Jan 2011 , 4:25am
post #5 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chef_Stef

..but often enough that I'm wishing for a more reliable recipe.




What's keeping you from trying another recipe? If you don't like the results of this one, it may be time to try another.

I've never made standard fondant. I've only made MMF and have always had success with that, so no need to venture out. I wouldn't know where to start helping you. Are you over kneading it?

Or maybe try adding more glycerin? I don't know. Out of ideas here. I don't think I'm much help tonight. I'm very curious to see other people's answers though. icon_biggrin.gif

VickeyC Posted 3 Jan 2011 , 4:50am
post #6 of

I only work with MMF, but I spray my vinyl gloves with cooking spray. It seems to help with the elasticity, as well as making it smoother. Wearing the gloves keeps the colors from staining my hands and it just feels right to wear them while working with food products. Make sure to keep them sprayed with the cooking spray or you will have a sticky mess. Not sure that this will help with the fondant that you make, but it may be worth a shot.

jillyscakes Posted 3 Jan 2011 , 5:17am
post #7 of

I would definately try a little gum trag or cmc don't forget gum trag won't have instant results.

tryingcake Posted 3 Jan 2011 , 7:03pm
post #8 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by VickeyC

I only work with MMF, but I spray my vinyl gloves with cooking spray. It seems to help with the elasticity, as well as making it smoother. Wearing the gloves keeps the colors from staining my hands and it just feels right to wear them while working with food products. Make sure to keep them sprayed with the cooking spray or you will have a sticky mess. Not sure that this will help with the fondant that you make, but it may be worth a shot.




LOL- I do the same thing - but have actually over sprayed. I go to roll it and it stretches way to thin the first roll out. LOL.... right off the board. Then I have to add more powdered sugar again.

DaPom Posted 3 Jan 2011 , 8:10pm
post #9 of

I use MMF, and when things get a little dry I do one of two things -- Add a little Crisco or microwave it for a few seconds (up to 30 for a double batch to cover really large cakes like an 18" square).
I also use two sheets of heavy weight vinyl to roll fondant (The Mat from sweetwise [dot] com).

jenmat Posted 3 Jan 2011 , 8:29pm

I was just dealing with this with my recipe. I know I've read to add more glycerine, but I really haven't had that help. I had some older stuff that I wanted to use for a display cake, and was about to give up. I dissolved some gelatine in water, microwaved it, let it cool just a bit and added it to the fondant. Perked it right up. I'm thinking that I'm going to keep going down that avenue, because I have the same problem when coloring my recipe really deep colors like black and red.

metria Posted 3 Jan 2011 , 8:31pm

i use toba's recipe as well ... i always thought the gelatin was for elasticity and the corn syrup and glycerin for for pliability ... dah, not sure if that makes sense or where i came up with that. i would like some light shed on this as well.

BlueMoon73 Posted 3 Jan 2011 , 8:32pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaPom

I use MMF, and when things get a little dry I do one of two things -- Add a little Crisco or microwave it for a few seconds (up to 30 for a double batch to cover really large cakes like an 18" square).
I also use two sheets of heavy weight vinyl to roll fondant (The Mat from sweetwise [dot] com).




I also do this with great results. Have not been brave enough to make other recipies of fondant. And since mine has worked so well don't really feel the need. It does sometimes get sticky, but that is usually when it is hot or to humid.

DebBTX Posted 3 Jan 2011 , 8:53pm

I use Toba's recipe for fondant, but have never made a bright red or black color with it.

I do knead the fondant with Crisco lightly rubbed onto my hands to prevent it from drying out.

-Debbie B.

Chef_Stef Posted 4 Jan 2011 , 3:20am

thanks guys. I use Crisco on my hands a bit too, but it seems like there's always that chance that no matter how carefully I work it or knead or what temp it is, it *could* turn to junk.

sigh

maybe more gelatine in the recipe...have to experiment i guess

zespri Posted 4 Jan 2011 , 7:11am

I recently discovered Jennifer Dontz's recipe, and I almost cried when I used it, it was SO easy to use! Her recipe is for candy clay added to regular fondant, and it makes it so elastic and easy to work with that I used about a third of the amount of fondant I used on the previous cake, and it was so much more sturdy. Detns and nicks were almost non existent. If you can get your hands on her DVD, give it a go, I can't say enough good things about how great the fondant is to work with.

Chef_Stef Posted 5 Jan 2011 , 1:27am

Thanks! I will save the info.

Oh...Jennifer...~! yoo hoo...!

jgrawlins Posted 6 Jan 2011 , 4:08am

I totally endorse Jennifer Dontz' CDs. I have been making cakes for almost 30 years, and her CDs are the best! I learned things from her that I have not heard anywhere else . . . very practical information that will help you a lot. No matter what level of experience you have, I know that Jennifer can help you. Her customer service is excellent also. She contacted me about the shipping charges on my order (it was heavy), and when I called back, I actually spoke to Jennifer! She is so helpful, and as I said, her CDs are invaluable. I would HIGHLY recommend them to anyone, and the products she offers are shipped quickly. What a jewel I have found with her (www.sugardelites.com).

cbcbackery Posted 25 Apr 2012 , 7:38pm

This happened to me once when i was coloring fondant dark blue...my fondant had the consistency of sugar cookie dough. the problem I had was poor binding of the ingredients already in the icing dough. I added some soy lecithin and my dough came together again. - just rubbed some on my hands and kneaded it into the dough.

fondant had these ingredients: glycerin, corn syrup, gelatin, powdered sugar, water :recipe for 1 - 10in round 2 layer cake

also, i definitely agree that using more expensive sugar makes a difference in the quality of your fondant..... and i also think that marshmallow fondant tastes like marshmallows and doesnt melt in your mouth like from scratch recipes. [/i]

solascakes Posted 5 Feb 2013 , 1:15am

Please what does soy lecithin look like and where can i buy it in uk. Thanks.

FullHouse Posted 5 Feb 2013 , 4:53pm

I was also going to suggest adding candy clay.  I didn't realize thats what Jennifer Dontz does as well.  I've heard great things about how easy her fondant is to work with though, so it makes sense :).  I used to make my own, but I find the $ I save is not worth the extra time and mess.  I order Fondx wholesale, makes my life so much easier!

cakeaffairsind Posted 10 Mar 2013 , 12:34pm

Try using few drops of Edible Glycerine to the Fondant & then try to add few Corn syrup to the mixture & I am sure that you will get classy & smooth Fondant, even I had faced the similar problems many a time later now we are doing fine.

priyamshah Posted 25 Mar 2013 , 12:01pm

A

Original message sent by cbcbackery

This happened to me once when i was coloring fondant dark blue...my fondant had the consistency of sugar cookie dough. the problem I had was poor binding of the ingredients already in the icing dough. I added some soy lecithin and my dough came together again. - just rubbed some on my hands and kneaded it into the dough.

fondant had these ingredients: glycerin, corn syrup, gelatin, powdered sugar, water :recipe for 1 - 10in round 2 layer cake

also, i definitely agree that using more expensive sugar makes a difference in the quality of your fondant..... and i also think that marshmallow fondant tastes like marshmallows and doesnt melt in your mouth like from scratch recipes. [/i]

Hi so what are the exact measurement of making a fondant and when do I add colors .. I am making a Mickey and Minnie .. So I need red yellow and pink and black

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%