Butter Cream

Lounge By graciesj Updated 6 Jan 2011 , 10:46pm by graciesj

graciesj Posted 3 Jan 2011 , 1:54am
post #1 of 22

I use shortening for bc most of the time and cut the sweetness with cs, and i cannot get rid of that taste. any suggestions?

21 replies
tryingcake Posted 3 Jan 2011 , 3:22am
post #2 of 22

Get rid of what taste? the sweetness?

I'm one of those snobs that doesn't use regular shortening in my buttercream (I do use sweetex when I need it really firm for certain things). Buttercream has to have butter in it to be called buttercream. That my opinion, for what it's worth.

But anyway, that's not what you asked.

You can add almond extract instead. That helps cut down on the sweetness but doesn't have an overpowering taste when used in limited amounts.

graciesj Posted 3 Jan 2011 , 4:24am
post #3 of 22

yeah, I just find that shortening lasts longer and can be left out if the customer needs it to be. I do agree that BUTTER is an essential ing' to butter cream,hence the name BC. But sometimes we as bakers need to do what the costumer wants. Actually I did use almond extract along with a butter/vanilla extract too. The taste was just okay for me. It didn't blow me over. So now I'm sitting here wondering how the costumer enjoyed it. They said they liked it but I don't know, we'll c I guess. If you've never made it with just shortening then you don't know what taste I'm referring toicon_smile.gif peace

tryingcake Posted 3 Jan 2011 , 4:31am
post #4 of 22

I have - because that's what we're to use taught in classes - I also use it when teaching. It's called decorator's icing. I vowed the second I was done with classes no more of that. It just plain tastes nasty and leaves a horrible feeling in the mouth. It's awesome for learning purposes though. It tastes like grocery store icing to me. Which, actually some customers prefer.

I found that on the rare occasion I have to use a 100% shortening recipe, Sweetex does not leave that greasy aftertaste behind.

Have you tried other brands of shortening or shortening specifically for baking and decorators? Or played with different extracts/flavorings?

indydebi Posted 3 Jan 2011 , 1:03pm
post #5 of 22

I've used nothing but a shortening bc for 30 yrs and have no idea what taste you're talking about. icon_confused.gif As a matter of fact, I used to tell people "there is no butter in buttercream" because I honest to god thought ALL wedding cake icing was made with shortening.

My recipe is one of a few on here that have rec'd rave reviews so maybe you might want to give it a try. People have said it doesn't taste too sweet, too heavy, or too greasy .... not sure which of those tastes you're talking about but maybe that covers it? icon_confused.gif

http://cakecentral.com/recipes/6992/indydebis-crisco-based-buttercream-icing

TexasSugar Posted 3 Jan 2011 , 3:00pm
post #6 of 22

Do you use Crisco or an off brand shortening? I tried Walmarts brand once and that was the only time I had the greasy mouth feeling.

Have you tried adding salt? That cuts the sweetness sometimes.

graciesj Posted 3 Jan 2011 , 3:09pm
post #7 of 22

[quote="indydebi"]I've used nothing but a shortening bc for 30 yrs and have no idea what taste you're talking about. icon_confused.gif As a matter of fact, I used to tell people "there is no butter in buttercream" because I honest to god thought ALL wedding cake icing was made with shortening.

My recipe is one of a few on here that have rec'd rave reviews so maybe you might want to give it a try. People have said it doesn't taste too sweet, too heavy, or too greasy .... not sure which of those tastes you're talking about but maybe that covers it? icon_confused.gif [/quote]

http://cakecentral.com/recipes/6992/indydebis-crisco-based-buttercream-icing[

Thank-you very much. I will try it this week. thx a bunchicon_smile.gif

graciesj Posted 3 Jan 2011 , 6:34pm
post #8 of 22

[quote="TexasSugar"]Do you use Crisco or an off brand shortening? I tried Walmarts brand once and that was the only time I had the greasy mouth feeling.

Have you tried adding salt? That cuts the sweetness sometimes.[/quote]

Yes I use Crisco. I live in Ontario and that's what we use. Do you happen to know of another brand? I don't shop at walmarticon_smile.gifthank-you

TexasSugar Posted 3 Jan 2011 , 6:39pm
post #9 of 22

I've only had luck with Crisco myself. If you want you can always look into the high ratio shortenings. You'll find it at cake supply stores or online.

graciesj Posted 3 Jan 2011 , 7:05pm
post #10 of 22

[quote="tryingcake"]I have - because that's what we're to use taught in classes - I also use it when teaching. It's called decorator's icing. I vowed the second I was done with classes no more of that. It just plain tastes nasty and leaves a horrible feeling in the mouth. It's awesome for learning purposes though. It tastes like grocery store icing to me. Which, actually some customers prefer.

I found that on the rare occasion I have to use a 100% shortening recipe, Sweetex does not leave that greasy aftertaste behind.

Have you tried other brands of shortening or shortening specifically for baking and decorators? Or played with different extracts/flavorings?[/quote]

No I haven't tried other brands of shortening but I think I will just to see the difference. Man trying out recipes to perfect it is soooooo costly. I'm determined to make it work though for myself and for my costumers. thank-you

tryingcake Posted 3 Jan 2011 , 7:26pm
post #11 of 22

Yeah, I know - but it's the only thing you can do to find what works best for you. Everything that leaves your door is a representation of what you consider quality. So make sure you are happy with it. Not everyone will agree, but those that matter will! Maybe you will be lucky and figure out what works best for you sooner than later. I fell in love with the first recipe I tried (after classes) and have been using it for years since. I was lucky.

graciesj Posted 3 Jan 2011 , 10:34pm
post #12 of 22

yeah, I've never been to a class ever. I'm a self taught baker who's passion goes way back to my teen years. So I don't have that experience of classes or the knowledge either. I'm truly grateful for this site and all the help I get from it. Pratice makes perfect that's what I've learned. I cannot to think that my latest customer wasn't happy with the icing. I dunno, maybe I'm just worried for nothing.

TexasSugar Posted 3 Jan 2011 , 11:14pm
post #13 of 22

From my understanding cooked buttercreams, like IMBC and SMBC are less sweet than crisco/butter buttercreams. If you feel like experimenting you might want to try them out and see what you think.

graciesj Posted 4 Jan 2011 , 4:17am
post #14 of 22

[quote="TexasSugar"]From my understanding cooked buttercreams, like IMBC and SMBC are less sweet than crisco/butter buttercreams. If you feel like experimenting you might want to try them out and see what you think.[/quote]

yeah, I just ate my latest project and trust me the flavour's amazing it's the sweetness. I can still feel the sugar in my mouth. I will def' look those up and give them a try. thank-you xo

TexasSugar Posted 6 Jan 2011 , 3:46pm
post #15 of 22

When you say you can still feel the sugar in your mouth, are you talking about the texture of the sugar? Sort of a grittiness?

graciesj Posted 6 Jan 2011 , 4:16pm
post #16 of 22

[quote="TexasSugar"]When you say you can still feel the sugar in your mouth, are you talking about the texture of the sugar? Sort of a grittiness?[/quote]

yes!!!!!! And the tingling of the sugar too

Kellbella Posted 6 Jan 2011 , 6:14pm
post #17 of 22

Try the Whimsical Bakehouse's bc recipe...it's so smooth and creamy...you won't feel anything gritty when you make this kind! icon_biggrin.gif

graciesj Posted 6 Jan 2011 , 6:18pm
post #18 of 22

[quote="Kellbella"]Try the Whimsical Bakehouse's bc recipe...it's so smooth and creamy...you won't feel anything gritty when you make this kind! icon_biggrin.gif[/quote]

thank-you very much...I have a few cakes I need to do in the up coming months and will def' give this a try as well. I will let u know how I like iticon_smile.gif good day gracie

TexasSugar Posted 6 Jan 2011 , 6:35pm
post #19 of 22

What brand powder sugar are you using? The gritty feel could be from using an off brand powder sugar that is made with beet sugar rather than pure cane.

graciesj Posted 6 Jan 2011 , 9:16pm
post #20 of 22

[quote="TexasSugar"]What brand powder sugar are you using? The gritty feel could be from using an off brand powder sugar that is made with beet sugar rather than pure cane.[/quote]

See this is y I think taking a class would be beneficial for me. I don't know these things. I would have to look at the ing' and get back to you. thanks a billion honicon_smile.gifgracie

TexasSugar Posted 6 Jan 2011 , 9:49pm
post #21 of 22

If it is a name brand then it will be pure cane and should say pure cane somewhere on the packaging. If it is a store brand and it doesn't say pure cane anywhere, and you look at the ingredients and it just says sugar, rather than cane or pure cane sugar, you want to skip using it if possible. Because it is probably made with beet sugar and that can give you that grainy or gritty feel.

graciesj Posted 6 Jan 2011 , 10:46pm
post #22 of 22

[quote="TexasSugar"]If it is a name brand then it will be pure cane and should say pure cane somewhere on the packaging. If it is a store brand and it doesn't say pure cane anywhere, and you look at the ingredients and it just says sugar, rather than cane or pure cane sugar, you want to skip using it if possible. Because it is probably made with beet sugar and that can give you that grainy or gritty feel.[/quote]

you're so smart, love it! thank-youxo

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%