How do I give away a cheesecake without my springform pan?

Baking By Liana Updated 4 Sep 2013 , 7:09pm by kaylawaylalayla

Liana Posted 30 Dec 2010 , 4:21am
post #1 of 35

I need to make a cake in a springform pan. It is a cheesecake with pudding on top, and a crust on the bottom and sides. My question is, how do I put it on another plate once it is made? Can I transfer it off my springform pan somehow without ruining the cake?

34 replies
Mac Posted 30 Dec 2010 , 4:27am
post #2 of 35

I line the bottom of the pan with a parchment round and once it has set up...I slide a thin spatula underneath the parchment to loosen it and then carefully slide it over to a cake board

sweetkake Posted 30 Dec 2010 , 4:32am
post #3 of 35

I bake the cake in the springform pan with a cardboard circle instead of the metal bottom. When it's chilled, just remove the springform sides and you're all set.

Chippi Posted 30 Dec 2010 , 4:50am
post #4 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by sweetkake

I bake the cake in the springform pan with a cardboard circle instead of the metal bottom. When it's chilled, just remove the springform sides and you're all set.





cardboard burns, your not afraid of it catching fire?

KSMill Posted 30 Dec 2010 , 5:20am
post #5 of 35

I loosen the springform side just to move it up about 1/2 inch and re-tighten, carefully run a knife along the bottom to loosen it and if it's a large cheesecake, slide a cake lifter underneath to transfer it to a cardboard. If it's a small cake, I just lift it to move it.

domesticdiva85 Posted 30 Dec 2010 , 5:38am
post #6 of 35

I bake cheesecakes and give them away all the time....all I do is turn the bottom of the springform pan over, place a grease-proof cardboard round in it and bake as usual. Turns out perfect everytime, then all I have to do is slide it off onto a plastic cheesecake container. Hope this helps!

Britt-K Posted 30 Dec 2010 , 5:38am
post #7 of 35

Magic Line has pans with a removable bottom (kind of like a tart pan) So instead of the sides coming off, you just push the bottom up and out. You could line it with parchment to help it slide off the bottom piece.

Corrie76 Posted 30 Dec 2010 , 5:42am
post #8 of 35

the cardboard won't burn, I used to work in a big grocery bakery and all our sheetcakes, brownies and cinnamon rolls were baked in disposable cardboard "pans"- I would put a circle of parchment on the cardboard though and if your worried about the bottom just set it on a small sheet of foil in the oven.

cheatize Posted 30 Dec 2010 , 6:45am
post #9 of 35

I leave the original bottom of the pan in and place a cardboard round on top of it.

-K8memphis Posted 30 Dec 2010 , 2:19pm
post #10 of 35

When you were in science class or when you watched Mr. Wizard, didn't you ever see water boiling in a paper cup, a cup folded & made from paper? The stuff inside the vessel has to burn up before the vessel itself will react to the heat (for some really great scientific reason)

DISCLAIMER:
Now a paper cup with a little footed bottom --that extra paper will burn. I daresay if the cup is waxed that will burn off too. So don't necessarily try this at home.

imagenthatnj Posted 30 Dec 2010 , 3:21pm
post #11 of 35

Note on this site:

To reuse the pan before the cake is all eaten, start by lining the inside base plate with parchment paper, so that you can slide the cake off the metal plate. Or replace the metal base with a parchment-lined piece of cardboard of the same size, and you can give away the cake and keep the base.

http://www.fantes.com/springform.html

Chippi Posted 30 Dec 2010 , 3:58pm
post #12 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by -K8memphis

When you were in science class or when you watched Mr. Wizard, didn't you ever see water boiling in a paper cup, a cup folded & made from paper? The stuff inside the vessel has to burn up before the vessel itself will react to the heat (for some really great scientific reason)

DISCLAIMER:
Now a paper cup with a little footed bottom --that extra paper will burn. I daresay if the cup is waxed that will burn off too. So don't necessarily try this at home.




I was deprived from Mr Wizard when I was young and I have no memory of science class! lolol

When I make my cheesecakes I usually use my cake pans I don't use a springform and I usually sit that in a pan of water in the oven. When done and it has cooled for few hours in fridge I sit it in hot water few seconds and it comes out nice and easy. icon_smile.gif

leily Posted 30 Dec 2010 , 4:04pm
post #13 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chippi

Quote:
Originally Posted by sweetkake

I bake the cake in the springform pan with a cardboard circle instead of the metal bottom. When it's chilled, just remove the springform sides and you're all set.




cardboard burns, your not afraid of it catching fire?




as k8memphis noted whatever is in the paper (or on it) has to evaporate (or burn up) before the cardboard will. Same concept that people use wax paper to line their cake pans, its completely covered with cake so the wax paper won't burn up.
Or microwaving the metal tips in water (with 1" of water over the top) to clean them, since they're covered with water they won't spark.... unless the water above them evaporates and exposes the metal.

Just providing some more examples icon_smile.gif

Chippi Posted 30 Dec 2010 , 5:04pm
post #14 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by leily

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chippi

Quote:
Originally Posted by sweetkake

I bake the cake in the springform pan with a cardboard circle instead of the metal bottom. When it's chilled, just remove the springform sides and you're all set.




cardboard burns, your not afraid of it catching fire?



as k8memphis noted whatever is in the paper (or on it) has to evaporate (or burn up) before the cardboard will. Same concept that people use wax paper to line their cake pans, its completely covered with cake so the wax paper won't burn up.
Or microwaving the metal tips in water (with 1" of water over the top) to clean them, since they're covered with water they won't spark.... unless the water above them evaporates and exposes the metal.

Just providing some more examples icon_smile.gif




thumbs_up.gif

littlejewel Posted 30 Dec 2010 , 5:26pm
post #15 of 35

did anyone see the episode of good eats, when alton baked a cheese cake in a non springfoam pan that he lined the botttom with parchment paper? I just can't remember how he did it.

indydebi Posted 30 Dec 2010 , 6:36pm
post #16 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chippi

Quote:
Originally Posted by sweetkake

I bake the cake in the springform pan with a cardboard circle instead of the metal bottom. When it's chilled, just remove the springform sides and you're all set.




cardboard burns, your not afraid of it catching fire?


You never forgot to take the cardboard off of the bottom of a frozen pizza and baked the whole thing in the oven? Uh ... happens at our house more often than I care to admit! icon_redface.gif
And as mentioned above, there is a whole line of paper and cardboard baking pans available for the "to go" side of the baking business!

Alfiesmom Posted 30 Dec 2010 , 8:06pm
post #17 of 35

imagenthatnj - I LOVE Fante's

on topic: My mother makes alot of cheesecakes in springform pan. she lines bottom with parchment then uses spatula to lift from bottom pan

cownsj Posted 30 Dec 2010 , 9:26pm
post #18 of 35

I bake cheesecakes in aluminum foil pans and give them to friends that way all the time.

haymeli Posted 7 Jan 2011 , 5:40am
post #19 of 35

I cover the cardboard with aluminum foil and place on top of the bottom. I hate for the cardboard to get soggy.

AmazingCook Posted 21 Jul 2011 , 11:56pm
post #20 of 35

in your springform pan - place a cardboard circle. cover with a piece of wax paper. Finish as usual

Carmen500 Posted 22 Jul 2011 , 12:22am
post #21 of 35

Alton chilled the cheesecake in the fridge for few hrs. let it sit in the hot water for 5 min. run a knife around the pan then put the cakeboard on top and flip, it comes out nice and easy.

bakingpw Posted 22 Jul 2011 , 12:28am
post #22 of 35

Don't use a springform pan at all. I baked hundreds of cheesecakes in regular 8,9 and 10" baking pans. Just line bottom of pan with parchment. After baking, chill overnight. Place the pan on a hot burner and warm. Run a knife around the edge, cover with plate and flip. Flip back onto cardboard. Works every time. (shameless plug - more cheesecAke tips on my blog)

nikki4199 Posted 22 Jul 2011 , 12:46am
post #23 of 35

I bake cheesecake all the time. let it sit in the fridge over night then pop open the pan and lift the bottom of the pan off and put on cake board. never have any problems with doing that.

stlcakelady Posted 22 Jul 2011 , 12:50am
post #24 of 35

Bake Deco has paper pans. Used them before.

AmazingCook Posted 22 Jul 2011 , 1:15am
post #25 of 35

No cardboard in this case does not burn because it is NOT open. I even bake brownies in a sheetcake pan with cardboard on the bottom.

mizzzliza Posted 10 Dec 2012 , 1:35pm
post #26 of 35

AI have a slightly different question. I have never gotten that slightly browned, baked look on the side of my cheesecake. I usually use a hot knife to release the cheesecake from the side of the pan but then it looks kinda choppy. Does anybody spray the pan with release? Or how can I achieve that finish?

BakingIrene Posted 10 Dec 2012 , 3:02pm
post #27 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by mizzzliza 

 I usually use a hot knife to release the cheesecake from the side of the pan but then it looks kinda choppy. Does anybody spray the pan with release? Or how can I achieve that finish?

Try using a small metal icing spatula instead of a knife.  Hold the leading edge of the spatula hard against the pan, and scrape in a smooth motion as far as you can reach around the circle.  Then take a clean spatula dipped in boiling water to smooth off the few marks. 

fearlessbaker Posted 10 Dec 2012 , 3:38pm
post #28 of 35

AYears ago my mom taught me to use a regular pan. Hold the baked cake over a low flame and rotate it then invert it onto a cake board. It has to be inverted to get it right side up. My cakes are always frozen though. Hth

fearlessbaker Posted 10 Dec 2012 , 3:43pm
post #29 of 35

APS You have to prep the pan and line with parchment. If you Google Cheesecake in regular pan many hints come up.

fearlessbaker Posted 29 Jan 2013 , 7:11am
post #30 of 35

AI use a regu pan as stated above.

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%