Servings Per Cake

Decorating By katiegraves Updated 29 Dec 2010 , 4:40am by sandeeb

katiegraves Posted 29 Dec 2010 , 2:40am
post #1 of 4

I am trying to get an idea of servings per cake for round and square cakes, 6", 8", and 10". I have found tons of charts that show "wedding" size servings, but that isn't realistic for birthday cakes, etc. I am looking for serving size in the cake is cut in half and the sliced in stright lines (not triangle pieces). Clear as mud, right? I am trying not to reinvent the wheel and wondered if anyone else already had this information to share. Thanks!!

3 replies
pmarks0 Posted 29 Dec 2010 , 2:59am
post #2 of 4

There are a couple of cutting guides here on CC which may give you more of what you're looking for.

http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=1300479

http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=1300478

However, really, the label of wedding piece or party piece is just a label. If you're making a cake that is 3-4" high, then you're not going to cut a piece that is any bigger than 1"x2"x4". That's a pretty big piece of cake. If you're looking at the "party piece" designation where they say a piece is 2x2", I don't believe they're looking at a 3-4" tier. That would be a huge piece of cake. Their looking, I think, at a 2" high cake so it would be 2x2x2" which when you look at it mathematically is the same size piece as a 1x2x4.

tryingcake Posted 29 Dec 2010 , 4:10am
post #3 of 4

I got tired of the many different serving guides and none agree with the other. I finally took out my pans and literally used a marker and drew serving sizes on the bottom. That's how many serving sizes I get.

For a wedding or birthday cake, 4" high, they are 1" wide and 2" deep. For a two inch high cake they are 2" wide by 2" deep.

If they want larger servings than that, they have to order more servings. Fir instance, if they want 4" high, 1" wide and 4" deep - they need to order double the servings. Or 4" high, 1" wide and 3" deep, they need to order 1.5 as many servings as they actually want.

We have to have a standard to go by. Whatever size you decide is your serving size, stick to it.

sandeeb Posted 29 Dec 2010 , 4:40am
post #4 of 4

Hi, When I started 20+ years ago I started with the chart in the Wilton Year book. Since then I have seen several charts but I decided the wilton chart was what I would base my sizes and prices on. It's worked out pretty good for me. I think just pick a chart and use the same one all the time.

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