Outline Bricks Before Or After? ... Or At All? ...

Decorating By emiyeric Updated 8 Jan 2011 , 10:50pm by emiyeric

emiyeric Posted 28 Dec 2010 , 6:39pm
post #1 of 17

I'm working on a few "brick" panels for the outside of a building for this weekend, but am trying to figure out the best way to achieve the look I'm going for. I'm using an impression mat and making fondant panels, leaving them to dry for the sides of the building.

So! Would you vote for my a) making the fondant panels out of brick-colored fondant, and then reicing over the edges of the bricks with white icing later; (b) making the fondant panels out of brick-colored fondant and NOT icing later, just leaving the one color; or (c) cream-colored fondant panels, rubbing in brick-colored petal dust later onto the brick part and hopefully sparing most of the creases between the bricks?

Any other suggestions?

Thanks in advance!

16 replies
costumeczar Posted 28 Dec 2010 , 8:59pm
post #2 of 17

I'd use modelling chocolate since it holds the impression better than fondant, and I wouldn't do anything to it once I impressed the design onto it. Regardless of whether you use the fondant or not, I'd just do it one color, because when you try to go back and add an extra color to something that small it's going to get messy!

Coral3 Posted 29 Dec 2010 , 8:44am
post #3 of 17

After your panels have dried out a bit and while you still have them flat before assembling, paint over the whole surface with a mixture of alcohol and petal dusts. The trick is getting the mixture right, if you add enough alcohol to the petal dust then when you paint it the colour will just settle in the grooves between bricks rather than over the whole surface. I would use a colour slightly darker than the brick colour, rather than white for this.

cabecakes Posted 29 Dec 2010 , 9:56am
post #4 of 17

Or you could make you bricks out of fondant panels and pipe on white icing, and then go back and remove the icing off the top and leave only what is in the crease. That would make it look like "struck" mortar between the bricks. Sorry "struck" is a mason's term. When they lay out block the mortar between the block bulges, so they go back with a tool and smooth out the bulge (this they call striking the block). You could "strike" the icing from your fondant bricks so to speak.

Coral3 Posted 29 Dec 2010 , 10:50am
post #5 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by cabecakes

Or you could make you bricks out of fondant panels and pipe on white icing, and then go back and remove the icing off the top and leave only what is in the crease. That would make it look like "struck" mortar between the bricks. Sorry "struck" is a mason's term. When they lay out block the mortar between the block bulges, so they go back with a tool and smooth out the bulge (this they call striking the block). You could "strike" the icing from your fondant bricks so to speak.




That's a good idea - a damp paintbrush might work well for removing the excess royal icing.

julzs71 Posted 29 Dec 2010 , 2:41pm
post #6 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by cabecakes

Or you could make you bricks out of fondant panels and pipe on white icing, and then go back and remove the icing off the top and leave only what is in the crease. That would make it look like "struck" mortar between the bricks. Sorry "struck" is a mason's term. When they lay out block the mortar between the block bulges, so they go back with a tool and smooth out the bulge (this they call striking the block). You could "strike" the icing from your fondant bricks so to speak.



That is so hard. I've done it this way. I think the petal dust is a easier method or don't do it at all.

emiyeric Posted 29 Dec 2010 , 3:03pm
post #7 of 17

Thanks guys! This IS a lot of detail work, so I'm leaning upwards not doing the icing mortar (I even learned a term, though - "struck"! Thanks!). Costumeczar, I believe you were working on a brick facade yourself a week or two ago, right? Did you ever take a picture? I don't typically work with modeling chocolate, and would hate to not get to practice first, but I'm working at the hospital again tonight so my time is pretty limited and fondants may not dry quite right in that time. So it might just be the bed wayti go. How long does modeling choc take to dry, btw?

Thanks again!

costumeczar Posted 29 Dec 2010 , 5:50pm
post #8 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by emiyeric

Thanks guys! This IS a lot of detail work, so I'm leaning upwards not doing the icing mortar (I even learned a term, though - "struck"! Thanks!). Costumeczar, I believe you were working on a brick facade yourself a week or two ago, right? Did you ever take a picture? I don't typically work with modeling chocolate, and would hate to not get to practice first, but I'm working at the hospital again tonight so my time is pretty limited and fondants may not dry quite right in that time. So it might just be the bed wayti go. How long does modeling choc take to dry, btw?

Thanks again!




The modelling chocolate is awesome to work with, it doesn't need to dry per se, it just gets stiffer as it cools off. You'd need to apply it directly to the cake unless you wanted to do it in sections, because when it stiffens up it can crack if you try to bend it to conform to a shape.

I cut the panels for the walls out of the red modelling chocolate, then put it onto melted chocolate, but you could just apply it to the sides of the cake using icing, or if it's covered in fondant you could attach it using melted chocolate for glue.

I did a tutorial for the whole thing that's going up on my blog next week, but here's a picture of the wall sections once they were attached to the cake. If you have specific questions I'd be glad to answer them in more detail. http://acaketorememberva.blogspot.com/2010/12/one-big-cake.html

emiyeric Posted 30 Dec 2010 , 12:05am
post #9 of 17

Wow, fantastic job in your cake!! Mine won't be nearly that ambitious icon_smile.gif ... I'll be happy if it looks half that good icon_smile.gif. How did you do the flag, though, and its staff? I need to make one for mine as well, and have been messing around with ideas. And I love how nice and straight your tan "stone" is toward the top of the building and overlapping the sides ... Another thing I'm going to have to figure out, how to get the trim and ledges straight and sharp. Thanks to all your pointers, everybody!

costumeczar Posted 30 Dec 2010 , 2:19pm
post #10 of 17

The flag was gumpaste that I dried over a dowel to give it the wave. The flagpole was a wooden skewer that I covered with modelling chocolate, then when I was going to attach the flag to the pole I cut a slit in the modelling chocolate and glued the gumpaste flag in with melted chocolate.

MissLisa Posted 30 Dec 2010 , 3:22pm
post #11 of 17

I realize you are working on brick panels but just to give you an idea, when I did the bricks on my windmill cake, I used the impression mat but then cut out the bricks, hand placed them and let them dry. After they dried, I piped the mortar in with royal icing and then wiped it off with a damp paper towel. I used grey icing for the mortar, I would not use bright white.

Now before ya'll say I'm crazy (and I might be) the reason I cut them all out was due to the shape of the windmill. I couldn't just wrap the fondant around that cone shape and keep the bricks level so I have very little options other than cutting each individual brick out and placing it.

Here is a link to a picture of the windmill: http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=1903325⊂=1903327&done=1

costumeczar Posted 30 Dec 2010 , 5:43pm
post #12 of 17

MissLisa, I was thinking of suggesting doing them individually, so I'm glad that I'm not the only one who would think to do it like that if need be!

emiyeric Posted 31 Dec 2010 , 12:51am
post #13 of 17

MissLisa, SO BEAUTIFUL!!! And I LOVE the look of the gray! If I end up doing the piping, I will certainly use your suggestion. I'm not quite sure yet of what I'll be doing ... cake's for tomorrow, and it depends on how much I can get done tonight, since I don't want to do a ton tomorrow morning. I'll post a picture when it's ready, and I;ll be sure to give you an update of what I ended up doing. Thank you all for your help!!

-Emi.

emiyeric Posted 1 Jan 2011 , 6:56pm
post #14 of 17

Here's the finished product! I was pressed for time, so didn't end up doing the grout, or the flag (can't wait to do it on a more detailed cake at some point, though icon_smile.gif ). Thanks so much for all your help, guys!

emiyeric Posted 8 Jan 2011 , 12:21am
post #15 of 17

Okay ... had some trouble the first time I tried posting it, but nothing hubby couldn't straighten out for me icon_wink.gif. Here's the finished product, then! Thanks again to everybody on this thread!!!

http://cakecentral.com/gallery/1908374

costumeczar Posted 8 Jan 2011 , 1:03am
post #16 of 17

That came out really well!

emiyeric Posted 8 Jan 2011 , 10:50pm
post #17 of 17

Thanks for all your help! icon_smile.gif

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%