Question About Tiering A Cake On A Fondant Covered Board

Decorating By SugarMama5 Updated 30 Dec 2010 , 10:28pm by SugarMama5

SugarMama5 Posted 27 Dec 2010 , 4:13pm
post #1 of 14

I have a question for you and was hoping I could get your advice. I am making a tiered cake tomorrow and was planning on having the cake on a round 10"cake board covered in fondant. The tiered cake will be an 8" and 6" round, fondant covered cake. Should I have the 8" cake on it's own 8" round cake board and then transfer it (the cake & it's board) to the 10" fondant covered board and keep the 8"cake board under the cake still? Or should I just cover the cake with fondant while it's on the fondant covered board? (Did that make sense? Lol)

I was also wondering if you always ice your cakes with your butter cream and then cover with fondant, or have you ever ice your cake with something like a cream cheese frosting and then cover with fondant?

Thanks! icon_biggrin.gif

13 replies
cakeandpartygirl Posted 27 Dec 2010 , 4:48pm
post #2 of 14

I hope that I am understanding you correctly. Yes that 8 in cake needs to be on it's own board. If not the cake will possibly sink into the 10 in one. I would have each cake on it's own board and cover them individually and use some sort of support system such as sps or dowel rods or boba tea straws between the 8 and 10 cake. I also would transfer them to the covered board after you have covered them in fondant. It lessens the chance that you will mess up your freshly fondant covered board. Also you can ice your cake in cream cheese but you would refrigerate it prior to and after covering it in fondant. Prior to, helps your fondant to not have bumps and wrinkles, etc. and after because cream cheese icing needs to be refrigerated. HTH

ETA: I am sorry I must have been half sleep reading the post icon_lol.gif In any case yes the 6 in should be on it's own board and the 8 in too.

genevieveyum Posted 27 Dec 2010 , 5:03pm
post #3 of 14

I find that it looks neater if I decorate the cake on my turntable and then put it on the presentation board, As for icing underneath, I've used both depending on what the person wants. As long as it's a frosting that firms up like buttercream or cream cheese or ganache, you're fine. Obviously, a whipped frosting or whipped cream wouldn't work because it'll collapse and the gas bubbles will form under the fondant.

pinkpiggie78 Posted 27 Dec 2010 , 5:10pm
post #4 of 14

I decorate my bottom layer directly on the cake drum and then cover the exposed portion with fondant. It saves me a board and some fondant.

As for the other question, I have used choco buttercream and cream cheese buttercream under fondant without issue.

CWR41 Posted 27 Dec 2010 , 6:26pm
post #5 of 14

Sounds like a plan! Yes, you could use the same size board under each of your 6" and 8" tiers (each on its own board), and transfer to your drum or STURDY fondant-covered base board (don't use only one corrugated circle.)

I would use a 12" base board (or minimum of 4 inches larger than base cakes), to have plenty of decorating space for borders, etc., and easier handling, otherwise there won't be much of your fondant covering showing.

Mb20fan Posted 27 Dec 2010 , 7:00pm
post #6 of 14

I've never covered the board with fondant, but have seen it done and I love how it looks, just not sure how it's done.
If you set your cake down first (which totally makes sense so as to not use too much fondant) and lay the fondant around the bottom tier, what's the easiest way to make sure your meaurements are correct? What is the process of covering the board with fondant, please?
TIA

cakedout Posted 27 Dec 2010 , 7:39pm
post #7 of 14

I know some decorators cover their board first: some cut out a circle in the center, the size of the bottom tier....others leave the board fully covered.

Another method would be to roll out your fondant large enough to cover the cake PLUS the width of the board. Smear a bit of piping gel or shortening on the board edges, then cover you cake/board with fondant. Once the cake and board are covered, use a pizza cutter to carefully cut around the base of the cake. Separating the cake fondant from the board fondant makes cutting/serving easier.

HTH

SugarMama5 Posted 27 Dec 2010 , 7:47pm
post #8 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by CWR41

Sounds like a plan! Yes, you could use the same size board under each of your 6" and 8" tiers (each on its own board), and transfer to your drum or STURDY fondant-covered base board (don't use only one corrugated circle.)

I would use a 12" base board (or minimum of 4 inches larger than base cakes), to have plenty of decorating space for borders, etc., and easier handling, otherwise there won't be much of your fondant covering showing.




OK, that's kinda what I was thinking... now my next question is do I need to put some icing or something else under the 8 inch cake/board before I put in onto the fondant covered board?? I would think I would so that the cake doesn't slip off...

Also they are wanting the 6 inch cake to be a dummy cake, do I need to put the dowels in the 8"cake? I was thinking it would be light enough that I wouldn't need to to dowels, but then again, maybe it's better tp be safe than sorry. What do you think?

Mb20fan Posted 27 Dec 2010 , 8:11pm
post #9 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakedout

I know some decorators cover their board first: some cut out a circle in the center, the size of the bottom tier....others leave the board fully covered.

Another method would be to roll out your fondant large enough to cover the cake PLUS the width of the board. Smear a bit of piping gel or shortening on the board edges, then cover you cake/board with fondant. Once the cake and board are covered, use a pizza cutter to carefully cut around the base of the cake. Separating the cake fondant from the board fondant makes cutting/serving easier.

HTH




Ahh...yes, that does help. Great, thanks.

CWR41 Posted 28 Dec 2010 , 3:53am
post #10 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by SugarMama5

OK, that's kinda what I was thinking... now my next question is do I need to put some icing or something else under the 8 inch cake/board before I put in onto the fondant covered board?? I would think I would so that the cake doesn't slip off...

Also they are wanting the 6 inch cake to be a dummy cake, do I need to put the dowels in the 8"cake? I was thinking it would be light enough that I wouldn't need to to dowels, but then again, maybe it's better tp be safe than sorry. What do you think?




I would smear a bit of BC in the center of the fondant-covered board before you place your cake on top of it.

A 6" dummy will weigh practically nothing covered in BC or fondant. I wouldn't use support dowels in the cake below it, however since it's so light, you wouldn't want it to go flying off either. I would skewer it into the cake below or at least attach it with another smear of BC (or royal icing--if you prefer).

ladyonzlake Posted 28 Dec 2010 , 4:15am
post #11 of 14

Each cake sits on it's own board. I cover my cake drum with fondant using water to adhere it. I cut a circle out of the center, use Elmers glue and place my cake down on the drum.

SugarMama5 Posted 30 Dec 2010 , 9:56pm
post #12 of 14

Thanks all, your advice helped a lot! The cake worked out perfectly! The only glitch I had was glueing the cake board to the dummy. I used elmers glue to glue it to the dummy, but the glue just wouldn't dry. So I replaced it with another cake board and smeared bc on it and that did the trick.

Icing a dummy cake is kinda a pain, it's so light it doesn't stay in place. I found that tricky. Any tips to icing a cake dummy?

CWR41 Posted 30 Dec 2010 , 10:20pm
post #13 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by SugarMama5

Icing a dummy cake is kinda a pain, it's so light it doesn't stay in place. I found that tricky. Any tips to icing a cake dummy?




You could try Ateco's pronged pivit for turntables:
http://www.cheftools.com/Ateco-Pronged-Pivot-for-Cake-Decorating-Turntables/productinfo/02-2565/

SugarMama5 Posted 30 Dec 2010 , 10:28pm
post #14 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by CWR41

Quote:
Originally Posted by SugarMama5

Icing a dummy cake is kinda a pain, it's so light it doesn't stay in place. I found that tricky. Any tips to icing a cake dummy?



You could try Ateco's pronged pivit for turntables:
http://www.cheftools.com/Ateco-Pronged-Pivot-for-Cake-Decorating-Turntables/productinfo/02-2565/




Very cool! One more thing to buy...

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