I Need A Fail Proof Technique For Painting Lustre Dust On Bc

Decorating By heathandhail Updated 26 Dec 2010 , 10:14pm by sadsmile

heathandhail Posted 26 Dec 2010 , 3:07am
post #1 of 13

Hi Y'all,

I'm doing a wedding cake and I need to do silver scrollwork on the sides of the cake. I'm trying to figure out the best way to do this and was thinking of doing a light grey buttercream and then painting on lustre dust....

Should I paint the lustre dust on dry or let the buttercream harden and paint the lustre dust on mixed with alcohol?

OR!!! Should I mix the lustre dust right into the buttercream?

Thanks for any help!!!

12 replies
LogansMommie Posted 26 Dec 2010 , 3:53am
post #2 of 13

I didn't realize you could paint buttercream?? I'm interested to see what others say...

I've only used luster dust on fondant and royal icing....

DSmo Posted 26 Dec 2010 , 4:07am
post #3 of 13

My experience has been that luster dust doesn't really work with buttercream. The fat in the buttercream makes the luster dust lose its luster.

cakegirl1973 Posted 26 Dec 2010 , 4:09am
post #4 of 13

I once tried to paint buttercream scroll work with luster dust mixed with alcohol with very poor results. I learned that you have to use royal icing, let it harden, then paint it.

DSmo Posted 26 Dec 2010 , 1:42pm
post #5 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakegirl1973

I once tried to paint buttercream scroll work with luster dust mixed with alcohol with very poor results. I learned that you have to use royal icing, let it harden, then paint it.



Ditto.

sewsweet2 Posted 26 Dec 2010 , 3:42pm
post #6 of 13

I paint buttercream piping all the time with luster dust/everclear. I use a crusting buttercream and allow the buttercream to crust well before painting it using a soft paint brust. Many of the cakes in my couture cake album show painted buttercream piping.
http://community.webshots.com/user/sewsweet2

Loucinda Posted 26 Dec 2010 , 6:37pm
post #7 of 13

SewSweet....HOLY COW!!! How have I never seen your work??? AMAZING! Your work is absolutely stunning!!

SBaker Posted 26 Dec 2010 , 8:18pm
post #8 of 13

When I need to paint luster dust on buttercream, I mix the luster dust with vegetable oil. It goes on smoothly and does not pull the buttercream.

genevieveyum Posted 26 Dec 2010 , 8:29pm
post #9 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by SBaker

When I need to paint luster dust on buttercream, I mix the luster dust with vegetable oil. It goes on smoothly and does not pull the buttercream.


it stays luster-ful even when mixed with oil?

Kiddiekakes Posted 26 Dec 2010 , 8:30pm
post #10 of 13

I was watchig Fabulous cake the other night and a bakery was making a large globe cake and it looked like she was piping the continents with silver and copper BC and then pulling it away with a wide brush..How would one achieve silver or gold BC to pipe...Just tons of lustre dust???

sadsmile Posted 26 Dec 2010 , 9:13pm
post #11 of 13

Why not try and use piping jell with the luster mixed in really well. It's half the work because you only have to pipe it and no painting and it's all the shine you want depending on what luster you use.


Kiddie that was just colored BC not metallic, but it was really great.

SBaker Posted 26 Dec 2010 , 9:27pm
post #12 of 13

Some of the lusters remain "luster-ful" better than others. My silver and 24K gold are the best. Golden bronze, while a gorgeous color, was not as metallic looking as I would have liked.

sadsmile Posted 26 Dec 2010 , 10:14pm
post #13 of 13

That is true. I like Nu-silver for an edible silver luster dust and Super Gold for an edible luster dust. Some times Aztec Gold depending on what shade is desired.

If it's for very small parts that most likely wont be eaten you can not beat the Silver and Gold Highlighter dusts mixed with vodka and painted on for a perfect chrome like finish of real gold and silver.

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