Candy Clay Roses Vs Gumpaste

Decorating By shannycakers Updated 22 Dec 2010 , 7:24pm by tastyart

shannycakers Posted 21 Dec 2010 , 3:38pm
post #1 of 20

Ok, so last night i tested out trying to make large beautiful gumpaste roses that all looked similar, i printed out tutorials and all, they were extrememly hard and time consuming and you had to hang upside down to dry, and they just took too long! AND they all didnt look the same or even similar, and barely rosish..

I had some candy clay I took out and starting forming a rose, and it turned out beautiful in 10 minutes! no water needed, no wait and dry to go on to the next step! I was flabergasted.

My question is why doesnt everone just use chocolate roses? why even bother with gumpast? when they are faster and just as pretty? am i missing something? thanks!!icon_smile.gif

newbie roser here, lol

19 replies
playingwithsugar Posted 21 Dec 2010 , 7:11pm
post #2 of 20

My reason - I love modelling chocolate roses, but I have very hot hands, and the stuff just melts like snow in He--.

Generic reason - Gumpaste is much easier to color than modelling chocolate, and lasts longer in changing environmental temperatures (hot to cold & vice versa).

Anyone else?

Theresa icon_smile.gif

tastyart Posted 21 Dec 2010 , 7:30pm
post #3 of 20

I love to use modeling chocolate too. It is also less fragile than the gumpaste. The modeling chocolate takes luster dust and petal dust well too.

Sorelle Posted 21 Dec 2010 , 7:58pm
post #4 of 20

Is it okay to use those little chocolate discs to make chocolate clay?

metria Posted 21 Dec 2010 , 8:07pm
post #5 of 20

yup! you can use the cheap stuff (almond bark) or the expensive stuff (fancy shmancy discs)!

i too have hot hands that are not ideal for messing with modeling chocolate for long icon_sad.gif but i do love it! can't get any easier than that 2-ingredient recipe!

Mb20fan Posted 21 Dec 2010 , 8:25pm
post #6 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by shannycakers

Ok, so last night i tested out trying to make large beautiful gumpaste roses that all looked similar, i printed out tutorials and all, they were extrememly hard and time consuming and you had to hang upside down to dry, and they just took too long! AND they all didnt look the same or even similar, and barely rosish..

I had some candy clay I took out and starting forming a rose, and it turned out beautiful in 10 minutes! no water needed, no wait and dry to go on to the next step! I was flabergasted.

My question is why doesnt everone just use chocolate roses? why even bother with gumpast? when they are faster and just as pretty? am i missing something? thanks!!icon_smile.gif

newbie roser here, lol




Any pics to share? icon_smile.gif

Loucinda Posted 21 Dec 2010 , 9:37pm
post #7 of 20

Here are some of the chocolate roses I have made. I LOVE working with it. The only problem here is the weather - they are a NO GO in the summertime, they cannot take the heat/humidity. BUT, once October hits, game on! I use them all fall and winter long! (the bow and the wrap in the 2nd pic are chocolate clay too!)


http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=1833883

http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=1653835

Mb20fan Posted 21 Dec 2010 , 9:56pm
post #8 of 20

Oh wow...those are beautiful. icon_biggrin.gif

Evoir Posted 21 Dec 2010 , 10:12pm
post #9 of 20

For me, there is no substitute for making a rose out of gumpaste. I DO make choc clay roses, to put onto cheesecakes and other dessert cakes, but for wedding cakes, I think nothing looks better than GP, due to the fineness of its texture, how thin you can mold it (and not have it flop!), how you can wire it and thereby create sprays of roses, the colours I can make them using any colouring technique I want, the ability to make as many as I want for upcomiong projects in white, then grabbing what I need and colouring them for a cake order to spec, their use-by date is like 25 years, and also, many of my brides want to keep their sugar art from their wedding cake...etc etc etc.

For me they are two different animals! Choc-clay when you want to eat it, GP for everything else due to its usability as I have described above icon_smile.gif

sillywabbitz Posted 21 Dec 2010 , 10:22pm
post #10 of 20

Do you use the same technique to make them? I've only made GP roses once but I made a ton for the yellow rose cake in my pics. I averaged 30 min a flower. That's a long time for me but I love the danty feel. I'm willing try modeling choc just curious how you roll them out and ruffle the edges etc.

playingwithsugar Posted 21 Dec 2010 , 10:32pm
post #11 of 20

I assembly line them - first the all the centers, then all the 3 petals, etc., so there's no way for me to know how long they take.

Theresa icon_smile.gif

Evoir Posted 21 Dec 2010 , 10:50pm
post #12 of 20

I can do a choc clay rose in under 5 minutes. You can't frill petals using a frilling stick - you just thin it out using your finger and thumb. You don't need to let the cone dry, you just make them all in one. In a lot of ways it is easier than using GP, yes. But to me they are completely different products and look very different. I usually strive for a more reaslistic-looking flower - whatever the type - when I am asked to make them for a cake. Even with roses - if you want a full blown rose for example - I individually wire petals and nothing compares to that (again, IMO) when using candy or choc clay icon_smile.gif

dchockeyguy Posted 21 Dec 2010 , 11:17pm
post #13 of 20

You just can't roll out modeling chocolate as thinly as you can gumpaste. It probably doesn't matter for a lot of clients, but for some it will, and it certainly matters for competition.

Loucinda Posted 21 Dec 2010 , 11:29pm
post #14 of 20

I offer both to my brides, they like the idea of EATING the roses, and them actually tasting delicious! Yes, they do look realistic too, I use a large cel stick to thin the petals. (obviously they are not going to pass muster as being a gumpaste rose, because they aren't!) I use ghirardelli white chocolate to make the ones I make.

They are completely different, and no way could you use the chocolate clay roses for a competition cake. My clients LOVE them though - and many brides have opted for them over the gumpaste ones (which are not good to eat).

They both have their place! (and as you can see in my pics, they look very nice too!)

SillyW - you make a cone and I use a small round cutter to do the petals. Just thin the top and sides of the round (not the bottom edge) It is very user friendly!

Loucinda Posted 22 Dec 2010 , 1:03am
post #15 of 20

Here is a cake with the chocolate clay roses on it...I think it looks very nice - chocolate roses can be elegant too, IMO.

http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=1898369&done=1

Karen421 Posted 22 Dec 2010 , 1:27am
post #16 of 20

I think the chocolate roses are elegant and beautiful! I can't use them very often because of our high temps. icon_smile.gif

tastyart Posted 22 Dec 2010 , 12:59pm
post #17 of 20

Someone asked for pictures. I have three roses in my pictures. One in dark chocolate, and one in white, and one silver. I don't roll the modeling chocolate. I only use my hands to form the petals. Basically, I roll a ball and then flatten it into a petal with my finger and thumb.

Loucinda Posted 22 Dec 2010 , 2:05pm
post #18 of 20

Tastyart - that white chocolate rose is absolutely stunning!! Who says they can't be as nice as gumpaste? They need to check that one out! thumbs_up.gif

shannycakers Posted 22 Dec 2010 , 2:39pm
post #19 of 20

Thank you all so much for your replies, I havent given up on gumpaste roses yet, i guess i just need a good tutorial or practice, i can do them in chocolate beautiful but not gumpaste..

Anyone know an easy tutorial that would help me, that does not have a gazillions steps that takes an hour, lol. ???

Thanks all~Shannon

tastyart Posted 22 Dec 2010 , 7:24pm
post #20 of 20

Thanks Loucinda!
I looked at yours, they are beautiful! I would much rather have flowers that are edible on a cake. Especially if they look as good as yours!

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