Transporting A 4 Tier Cake

Decorating By cfpeoples Updated 7 Feb 2011 , 4:33pm by platinumlady

cfpeoples Posted 21 Dec 2010 , 2:49pm
post #1 of 17

This probably is a silly question...but i thought i'd ask some experts. The biggest cake i've transported so far was a 3 tier cake, but next week i am transporting a 4 tier wedding cake. I was just wondering if most of you assemble it ahead of time, or on site. It is 8, 10, 12 and 14 inch round covered in fondant, NO gumpaste flowers, so i think it should be o.k. but then on the other hand they were giving me a bit of a hard time on price even though i gave them a HUGE deal since i know the family (they wanted it for about $100...seriously) So i almost hate to bring it in unassembled b/c then it's not all impressive right off the bat. Maybe i'm over analyzing. Anyway, is there much danger in transporting it together...or should i just play it safe. I know it sounds silly...just want an opinion from people who have been there. THANKS!! icon_biggrin.gif

16 replies
cfpeoples Posted 21 Dec 2010 , 2:56pm
post #2 of 17

And when i say know i mean they go to my church....talk to them when i run into them, not hang out with them...so i did not feel unfair not giving it to them basically at cost. This order was placed a couple days ago for DECEMBER 28th!! (wedding got bumped WAY up) I had to pay expedited shipping to get stuff for it on time.

leily Posted 21 Dec 2010 , 3:03pm
post #3 of 17

what support system are you using? I wouldn't hesitate to transport with the SPS system.... that is if you can carry a 4 tier cake though

cakeville82 Posted 21 Dec 2010 , 3:09pm
post #4 of 17

I've transported a 5 tiers fully assembled, just did one last week.
I use bubble tea straws and a center dowel, never had a problem.

cfpeoples Posted 21 Dec 2010 , 3:21pm
post #5 of 17

oh....sorry i forgot to say. For support system bubble-tea straws with a center dowel. I know i shouldn't care what they think and just do it the safe way!!

cai0311 Posted 21 Dec 2010 , 4:17pm
post #6 of 17

I also use bubble tea straws and a center dowel (acutally, 2 offset center dowels) and never had a problem before.

cfpeoples Posted 21 Dec 2010 , 4:21pm
post #7 of 17

Thanks everyone. you are right Leily about carrying it though. And there could be ice at that point. I would hate to drop it... icon_cry.gif

leah_s Posted 21 Dec 2010 , 4:30pm
post #8 of 17

Well, if you're using SPS, then I'd say sure, if you can lift it, go ahead and transport it assembled. i can't lift that much after a shoulder injury over a year ago. Systems like straws and dowels - I personally don't trust as mush as SPS.

Loucinda Posted 21 Dec 2010 , 11:36pm
post #9 of 17

I just delivered a christmas tree cake (6 tiers, 11 layers) with bubble tea straws and the center dowel. (this one wouldn't fit in my cake safe) It is in my pics.

http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=1891540

I also use a cake safe ( www.cakesafe.com ) which is the BOMB for delivering cakes professionally!

PinkLisa Posted 21 Dec 2010 , 11:47pm
post #10 of 17

I would deliver it stacked and drive very carefully. I don't like to assemble on site. I keep the cake in the frig until time to leave and keep the car very cold.

Dayti Posted 21 Dec 2010 , 11:58pm
post #11 of 17

Its not a silly question. But really, as others have said, consider if you can lift it. Also, if you don't know the venue personally, you should ask them for info like where can you park, are there any stairs, how many doors will you have to open...
I have a flat trolley to deliver cakes, which is fine IF I can lift the cake into and out of the car and on and off the trolley, and IF there are no stairs. Its good for flat ground and being able to get the doors open myself.
If in doubt, just take it in two lots of two tiers, and assemble there quickly. It would be awful if instead of impressing them with a grand cake entrance, the cake fell because your arms were tired... icon_redface.gif

Sweet_Toof Posted 26 Dec 2010 , 12:56am
post #12 of 17

I've done classes and was never taught to use a centre dowel - infact, I had never heard of one until referring to CC.
We were taught to use dowels (in place of what most people use bubble straws) in each tier and that was it.... we were also taught just to assemble on site....
If I could do it successfully, I'd prefer to transport already stacked... is this safe enough just with dowels/bubble straws in each tier (and nothing else)?

ConfectionsCC Posted 26 Dec 2010 , 1:45am
post #13 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Loucinda

I just delivered a christmas tree cake (6 tiers, 11 layers) with bubble tea straws and the center dowel. (this one wouldn't fit in my cake safe) It is in my pics.

http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=1891540

I also use a cake safe ( www.cakesafe.com ) which is the BOMB for delivering cakes professionally!




WOW those are expensive!!!!! I think I would stick with the SPS, Works great, with out the high price tag! Plus, I never plan to toss my cakes across a football field, so I think that may be a little overkill lol! but to each their own!

Loucinda Posted 26 Dec 2010 , 5:15am
post #14 of 17

Yes, they are a tad pricey, but so were my ML pans, my Agbay, my convection oven, my GREX airbrush (I am a firm believer that if you buy quality products to begin with, they last a VERY long time!) For the average person, it may not be feasable, but for the pros, I think the cake safes are a must have. It makes me cringe seeing people deliver cakes in taped together brown boxes....does not look professional at all to me. Also, ONE saved cake pays for the cake safe.

Everyone has their way of doing things, that is just the way I do it! The cake is safe during transport, and looks very professional when delivered. icon_smile.gif

platinumlady Posted 7 Feb 2011 , 12:56am
post #15 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Loucinda



I also use a cake safe ( www.cakesafe.com ) which is the BOMB for delivering cakes professionally!




I have a four-tier coming up & was stress on how to get it there & assemble etc...wedding is a couple hours drive & I didn't want to to too much their so I can get back...I will definitely invest in the cake safe...thanks for the info

Jennifer353 Posted 7 Feb 2011 , 2:56pm
post #16 of 17

Sorry to interupt but does the cake safe not result in a hole going the whole way through your cake and potentially damaging decorations/finish on the top of the cake?

platinumlady Posted 7 Feb 2011 , 4:33pm
post #17 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jennifer353

Sorry to interupt but does the cake safe not result in a hole going the whole way through your cake and potentially damaging decorations/finish on the top of the cake?




It's the same as a dowel rod that goes through the middle of a cake to keep it sturdy. The whole is small & can easily be covered. Whether it be with icing/or decorations. And of course if there were flowers, decorations etc. that go on top of the cake you would put that on the cake once you get there so no decoration are damaged.

For me I think it a win win situation especially if driving for 2 to 3 hours to deliver a cake. I rather be concentrating all my attention on the road & not have to be worrying about the cake smashing or getting damaged or the icing melting.

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