Fondant + Cookies = What?

Decorating By Lizzard1 Updated 22 Dec 2010 , 1:45am by cakesrock

Lizzard1 Posted 21 Dec 2010 , 6:31am
post #1 of 22

So, I have noticed this trend lately of fondant cookies. I would like to know how these turn into a tasty product. In my personal opinion, fondant is tasty by itself but I really don't enjoy it in combination with cake. (its a texture thing) Now, please don't misinterpret me, I always use fondant on my cakes I just prefer to remove it before I eat my cake icon_smile.gif

Someone please tell me why on god's green earth would it be a good idea to but fondant on a cooke?! icon_razz.gif I am sorry, it just doesn't sound good at all. What happend to the good times of nicely piped bc? To me taste comes before looks and I can't believe it is good! Maybe I am just a bc girl, i dont know. Someone prove me wrong!! haha

I am curious!

21 replies
Coral3 Posted 21 Dec 2010 , 6:56am
post #2 of 22

I quite like the taste of fondant on sugar cookies and prefer it to royal icing (which really isn't nice if you ask me)...I do prefer the look of royal icing on cookies though.

Lizzard1 Posted 21 Dec 2010 , 7:09am
post #3 of 22

Ok, thats what I was wanting to know!! Thanks icon_smile.gif Does the fondant get hard and dried out? I don't care for the taste of royal icing too, but BC is mighty tasty and it doesn't look bad either icon_smile.gif

Texas_Rose Posted 21 Dec 2010 , 7:17am
post #4 of 22

It tastes really good. The advantage to fondant is that in about three hours, I can bake, decorate and bag probably 50 cookies. It's easy enough that my 8 year old can do it all herself, and produce professional-looking results.

I put the fondant on when the cookies come out of the oven. Within 30 minutes they're firm enough to stack. They're sturdy enough that I can pack them up and mail them to relatives across the country, and they survive the trip.

I always add flavoring to my fondant...usually butter rum, vanilla or coconut, and then I put Lorann's buttery sweet dough emulsion in the cookie dough. It tastes better than buttercream, to me. The fondant doesn't get rock-hard. You can chew it with the cookie.

Anyhow, give it a try sometime, next time you've got a little bit of leftover fondant.

leah_s Posted 21 Dec 2010 , 1:05pm
post #5 of 22

Are you kidding? Fondant on a sugar cookie is the best ever! Totally yummy! Know what else is good? Roll out a strip of fondant and smear on some peanut butter. Roll it up like a pinwheel. Yummo!

bobwonderbuns Posted 21 Dec 2010 , 1:24pm
post #6 of 22

As a decorator I prefer fondant for ease of use and the clean look it gives the finished cookie. As for the fondant itself, I use any one of six different flavors of fondant (depending on the cookie): chocolate, white chocolate, white chocolate cheesecake, Vanilla, Marshmallow and so on... Then to attach the fondant I used strained preserves (peach, apricot, raspberry...) to a rolled Vanilla sugar cookie. The result, a taste sensation that doesn't overwhelm and a gorgeous cookie. Everybody loves them!! icon_biggrin.gif

Bluehue Posted 21 Dec 2010 , 1:31pm
post #7 of 22

@ Leah - never thought of doing that with peanut butter and fondant - icon_lol.gif

Not sure about *the trend lately* - many have been doing it for a few years - if not longer...
Fondant on cookies are the most requested cookies i get orders for.
http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=1854735

IMO i think they can look just as lovely as any cookie decorated with RI - and as TR said abouve - its quicker .........and less drying time required.

Depending on the type of fondant you use i guess, will determine the overall taste.
Some aren't bad - whilst others are shockers.

Hope you enjoy creating some.



Bluehue icon_smile.gif

CupcakesbyMadelaine Posted 21 Dec 2010 , 1:35pm
post #8 of 22

I just brush a little light corn syrup on the cookie and it works great. My husband brushes it while I roll the fondant and the result is super quick.

EllieA Posted 21 Dec 2010 , 1:45pm
post #9 of 22

If I use marshmallow fondant, I add half an envelope of flavored gelatin (Jello), and that gives it (a) color; and (b) flavor. But I'm careful to combine flavors because some of them are just not good! But the others? Delicious!

bradfab Posted 21 Dec 2010 , 2:55pm
post #10 of 22

I've been using marshmallow RBC lately (http://cakecentral.com/recipes/7434/marshmallow-rolled-buttercream-for-decorated-cookies). I like how they've turned out- look and taste. Those of you who use fondant- do you think it's better tasting than RBC?

makeminepink Posted 21 Dec 2010 , 3:09pm
post #11 of 22

I don't like the taste of fondant on cake either-- I agree-- it's a texture thing. Something about the fondant taking alot more chewing time than the cake! I don't care for royal icing either. But fondant on sugar cookies-- yum! Just cut out your shape before you even put your cookies in the oven and then lay the fondant cut-outs on the hot cookies as soon as they come out of the oven. This is about the only way I want to do cut-out cookies any more!

megg5 Posted 21 Dec 2010 , 4:20pm
post #12 of 22

yummmm!! I just made some for my daughter's christmas party!! They were such a hit!!! ALL of the cookies were eaten!! And i looved the clean look of the cookies!! GO FOR IT!!

playingwithsugar Posted 21 Dec 2010 , 4:35pm
post #13 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobwonderbuns

As for the fondant itself, I use any one of six different flavors of fondant (depending on the cookie): chocolate, white chocolate, white chocolate cheesecake




Stop right there, Bob - do you make the white chocolate cheesecake fondant or buy it? I'd love to try it. Have a recipe I can use?

Theresa icon_smile.gif

leah_s Posted 21 Dec 2010 , 4:37pm
post #14 of 22

Makeminepink has the technique! A fondant shape laid on a hot cookie will laminate itself to the cookie. No brushing anything on the cookie. It eliminates a step and speeds up the process.

infinitsky Posted 21 Dec 2010 , 4:44pm
post #15 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobwonderbuns

As a decorator I prefer fondant for ease of use and the clean look it gives the finished cookie. As for the fondant itself, I use any one of six different flavors of fondant (depending on the cookie): chocolate, white chocolate, white chocolate cheesecake, Vanilla, Marshmallow and so on... Then to attach the fondant I used strained preserves (peach, apricot, raspberry...) to a rolled Vanilla sugar cookie. The result, a taste sensation that doesn't overwhelm and a gorgeous cookie. Everybody loves them!! icon_biggrin.gif




Love the idea of using strained preserve instead of pipinng gel. It will be much tastier.

All4Show Posted 21 Dec 2010 , 5:04pm
post #16 of 22

I pipe buttercream under the fondant. The cookies always stay tender and yummy.

Lizzard1 Posted 21 Dec 2010 , 6:35pm
post #17 of 22

Ok, well thanks for all the replies!! I guess I am going to give it a try since so many of you swear by it icon_lol.gif I suppose I am just very used to a soft frosting that the idea seemed weird to me. You guys are awesome and I will use this technique soon icon_smile.gif

makeminepink Posted 21 Dec 2010 , 6:39pm
post #18 of 22

Just use the fondant as the base coating and the decorate with buttercream. That way you will have made it much easier and still have the buttercream you love.

bobwonderbuns Posted 21 Dec 2010 , 11:18pm
post #19 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by playingwithsugar

Quote:
Originally Posted by bobwonderbuns

As for the fondant itself, I use any one of six different flavors of fondant (depending on the cookie): chocolate, white chocolate, white chocolate cheesecake



Stop right there, Bob - do you make the white chocolate cheesecake fondant or buy it? I'd love to try it. Have a recipe I can use?

Theresa icon_smile.gif




When I make my white chocolate fondant, I use Jennifer Dontz's recipe (on her DVD.) Then I add a few drops of Cheesecake LorAnn oil (to taste) and voila -- white chocolate cheesecake fondant. Can you say "to die for"? icon_lol.gif

dchockeyguy Posted 21 Dec 2010 , 11:21pm
post #20 of 22

I found that gingerbread also tastes nice with some fondant on it. Especially because my gingerbread this year was pretty sharp with ginger flavor. But generally, I just use a little piping gel on the cookie and put it on.

I've done the warm cookie thing, but if you want texture, etc, the heat tends to melt away your nice pattern!

bobwonderbuns Posted 21 Dec 2010 , 11:25pm
post #21 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by infinitsky

Quote:
Originally Posted by bobwonderbuns

As a decorator I prefer fondant for ease of use and the clean look it gives the finished cookie. As for the fondant itself, I use any one of six different flavors of fondant (depending on the cookie): chocolate, white chocolate, white chocolate cheesecake, Vanilla, Marshmallow and so on... Then to attach the fondant I used strained preserves (peach, apricot, raspberry...) to a rolled Vanilla sugar cookie. The result, a taste sensation that doesn't overwhelm and a gorgeous cookie. Everybody loves them!! icon_biggrin.gif



Love the idea of using strained preserve instead of pipinng gel. It will be much tastier.




To me it does taste better -- a little zing of flavor. Everyone likes it. I don't do fondant on cookies right out of the oven because A) I bake LOTS of cookies at one time and B) I do some intricate stuff that I cannot accommodate on a hot cookie. But whatever works for you! icon_biggrin.gif

cakesrock Posted 22 Dec 2010 , 1:45am
post #22 of 22

I am terrible at decorating cookies with RI and I can actually produce a nice looking cookie with fondant. I use Rhonda's ultimate MMF - it tastes so much better than any other MMF I have tried because the lemon cuts the sickeningly sweet taste of the MMF. I add a bit of the princess cake and cookie emulsion to my NFSC's. I get rave reviews!

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