Oven Turned Off During Baking

Baking By Annabakescakes Updated 22 Dec 2010 , 8:40pm by imagenthatnj

Annabakescakes Posted 18 Dec 2010 , 7:38pm
post #1 of 10

I was waiting for lunch to be done before I baked my cakes, so I had them ready to go in when the biscuits came out. Dh took the biscuits out, I popped my cakes in, and DH went back after he ate and turned to oven off. I discovered it when the oven was at about 175. But they were already risen and with a skin on top, and slightly brown on the edges, so I couldn't just take them out. I turned it up a little at a time, and now they look fine, but has this ever happened to anyone else? Were the cakes dry or rubbery? Are they going to fall? I don't have the ingredients to re-bake, and DH is gone with the car, baby is sleeping and I am running out of time!

9 replies
lutie Posted 18 Dec 2010 , 8:34pm
post #2 of 10

I bake my cakes @ 300 degrees for 20 minutes, then finish them off with a 325 degree oven... never the opposite like you had happen. icon_lol.gificon_lol.gif

If it happened to me, I would take a transparent straw (I use bubble tea straws for stabilizing my layers when stacking...they are an excellent width) and put it in the cake, draw it out, and look at the cake through the straw.you could tell if the cake is evenly baked...then replace the cake plug carefully. This is if it is for someone else...if it happened to be just for the family, I would cut a slice out of it and then put it back in, icing over it. Hope that helps!

Annabakescakes Posted 19 Dec 2010 , 1:55am
post #3 of 10

That is a good idea, Lutie! I did go ahead and use it, it looked good, a knife came out dry when I stabbed it, lol. But I noticed when I touched it an hour later, my fingerprint sort of stayed in it. It is REALLY moist but it is cooked through, I could tell when I layered it. I hope it transports well, and doesn't crumble. I would chill it but it is going to have airbrushing on it.

Kitagrl Posted 19 Dec 2010 , 2:02am
post #4 of 10

I had an oven that would do that...drove me nuts! If I caught it in time, it baked okay but if I didn't catch it in time, sometimes the consistency of the cake would be more coarse...

Anyway after it happened on and off for years, I finally replaced the oven. Phew!

Karen421 Posted 19 Dec 2010 , 2:15am
post #5 of 10

I have an oven that does that, but not consistently - just randomly, so I never know and always have to watch my cakes. If I don't catch it in time, the cake ends up very dense.

indydebi Posted 19 Dec 2010 , 7:21am
post #6 of 10

but your oven didn't turn off automatically, right? your hubby turned it off? Did you whack him up-side the head for that? icon_lol.gif

diamonds-and-rust Posted 19 Dec 2010 , 8:01pm
post #7 of 10

[. I would chill it but it is going to have airbrushing on it.[/quote]

Anna, are you not supposed to airbrush a chilled cake? I just got an airbrush and wasn't aware of this....TIA!

Annabakescakes Posted 22 Dec 2010 , 8:29pm
post #8 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

but your oven didn't turn off automatically, right? your hubby turned it off? Did you whack him up-side the head for that? icon_lol.gif



Yeah, he turned it off. And no, he was gone, so I called him, and then he beat himself up about it! I didn't have to do anything!

Annabakescakes Posted 22 Dec 2010 , 8:40pm
post #9 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by diamonds-and-rust

[. I would chill it but it is going to have airbrushing on it.




Anna, are you not supposed to airbrush a chilled cake? I just got an airbrush and wasn't aware of this....TIA![/quote]

If you airbrush a cake, then chill it and then take it out, it condensates and gets water drops all over it. It would help if you had a box big enough to put the cake in so the outside air (and moisture) doesn't collect on the cake. You would want to keep the cake in the box until it was room temp. Most people don't know that it is the moist air that collects on the cake and makes drops. It is not the moisture coming out of the cake. BTW, I learned not to refrigerate an airbrushed cake the hard way! I ruined the cutest design, thank heavens it was a freebie.

And it helps to PRACTICE PRACTICE PRACTICE with the airbrush! It really doesn't take too much color to practice, it lasts forever, and it is worth using 5 bottles of coloring on a buttercreamed piece of cardboard, rather than ruining a cake that is due in 3 hours! icon_cry.gif

imagenthatnj Posted 22 Dec 2010 , 8:40pm
post #10 of 10

You could take an apple corer and extract a piece from the center, that you could fill with buttercream later or carefully put backif you want to be sure they're cooked.

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