Luster Dust.... Urgent!

Decorating By BunglesNuNu Updated 16 Feb 2011 , 11:02pm by Cupcations

BunglesNuNu Posted 17 Dec 2010 , 9:35pm
post #1 of 24

I am making a cake for a Muslim friend, the cake is due in few hours.
As her family cannot have any alcohol for religious reason, is there any other way to apply luster dust onto the fondant?

Thankx a million! icon_cry.gif

23 replies
Mb20fan Posted 17 Dec 2010 , 9:38pm
post #2 of 24

I don't work with fondant often, but I believe I've read that alcohol is used BECAUSE it evaporates and leaves some 'stickiness' behind.

I'm sure someone else will chime in shortly... icon_biggrin.gif

dchinda Posted 17 Dec 2010 , 9:41pm
post #3 of 24

I have used the aerosal spray rather than painting the dust on. It works pretty well. I'm sorry I don't know the name brand but check with your local supplies store.

BunglesNuNu Posted 17 Dec 2010 , 9:42pm
post #4 of 24

I have asked them before, they say strictly no! icon_cry.gif
Please HELP!

preciosa225 Posted 17 Dec 2010 , 9:44pm
post #5 of 24

Some people use lemon extract instead of alcohol but all extracts (including vanilla) contain alcohol so I am not sure if you will be able to use that. Maybe you can ask them about that.

AENM1 Posted 17 Dec 2010 , 10:07pm
post #6 of 24

I have heard from a cake friend clear vanilla for non alcohol

UltimateBaker Posted 17 Dec 2010 , 10:07pm
post #7 of 24

You must use an alcohol-based liquid. Luster dust is not water-soluble and will not fuse with water.

Read more: How to Use Luster Dust | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/how_5154971_use-luster-dust.html#ixzz18PP3fsZa


You can try
Sheen Airbrush Colors it come in gold silver and pearl

Image

myslady Posted 17 Dec 2010 , 10:16pm
post #8 of 24

off topic: what kind of fondant are you using? I have a muslim friend as well but she cannot eat fondant because of the gelatin in it. Just wondering if you found a gelatin free version?

metria Posted 17 Dec 2010 , 10:26pm
post #9 of 24

what about confectioner's glaze?

diamonds-and-rust Posted 17 Dec 2010 , 11:14pm
post #10 of 24

You certainly can use luster dust dry with a fluffy brush....the color just wont be as intense as if you had used vodka or extracts.

Coral3 Posted 18 Dec 2010 , 8:40am
post #11 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by diamonds-and-rust

You certainly can use luster dust dry with a fluffy brush....the color just wont be as intense as if you had used vodka or extracts.




Yes, that's exactly what I was about to say!

Lustre dust can absolutely be brushed on dry. Agree with the fluffy brush - get a nice thick one if you're doing larger areas. Also, when I make small fondant decorations (like beads, little bells and other small bits n pieces), I let dry/firm up, then put them into a little container with some lustre powder with the lid on and shake until evenly coated.

PatricesPieces Posted 18 Dec 2010 , 9:02am
post #12 of 24

I have heard you can use vegetable oil as well. I have not tried it yet, but i'm definitely going to give it a try.

BunglesNuNu Posted 18 Dec 2010 , 10:02am
post #13 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by myslady

off topic: what kind of fondant are you using? I have a muslim friend as well but she cannot eat fondant because of the gelatin in it. Just wondering if you found a gelatin free version?



I am using Satin Ice, as it says on the label it actually does not contain any gelatin.
One other note, as for gelatin, people never questioned about the gelatin content in the medicinal capsules, but they won't eat any food product that contains gelatin?
The key ingredients with any drug capsules are gelatin!

BunglesNuNu Posted 18 Dec 2010 , 10:07am
post #14 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coral3

Quote:
Originally Posted by diamonds-and-rust

You certainly can use luster dust dry with a fluffy brush....the color just wont be as intense as if you had used vodka or extracts.



Yes, that's exactly what I was about to say!

Lustre dust can absolutely be brushed on dry. Agree with the fluffy brush - get a nice thick one if you're doing larger areas. Also, when I make small fondant decorations (like beads, little bells and other small bits n pieces), I let dry/firm up, then put them into a little container with some lustre powder with the lid on and shake until evenly coated.



At the end I didn't put any luster dust on, I couldn't find a satisfactory way of doing it.
Any extract contains alcohol, so using extract is out too.
I know I can dry brush them on, but the effect of the shine and shimmer is significantly reduced. I need to use it to enhance the embossed pattern on it, and the luster dust and disco dust just wouldn't stick!

PrivateNameHere Posted 18 Dec 2010 , 12:23pm
post #15 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by BunglesNuNu

Quote:
Originally Posted by myslady

off topic: what kind of fondant are you using? I have a muslim friend as well but she cannot eat fondant because of the gelatin in it. Just wondering if you found a gelatin free version?


I am using , as it says on the label it actually does not contain any gelatin.
One other note, as for gelatin, people never questioned about the gelatin content in the medicinal capsules, but they won't eat any food product that contains gelatin?
The key ingredients with any drug capsules are gelatin!



Good point. I have no idea. They do make gelatin-free caplets, but those are sold empty usually (for homemade remedies). I've never seen tylenol, for instance, sold in gelatin free caplets.

Cake4ever Posted 18 Dec 2010 , 8:49pm
post #16 of 24

If you are trying to highlight something, try rubbing it very very lightly with Crisco, vegetable shortening and then dry dust. That should adhere. But you must be very sparing and smooth about it. Experiment and see if it works for you. I did this using a stencil on my tea cup cake in my gallery. The dusts adhered well for me.

Hope it works for you. thumbs_up.gif

lizzycakes Posted 18 Dec 2010 , 8:54pm
post #17 of 24

So, you didn't flavor the buttercream at all?

BunglesNuNu Posted 19 Dec 2010 , 1:35pm
post #18 of 24
Quote:
Quote:


Good point. I have no idea. They do make gelatin-free caplets, but those are sold empty usually (for homemade remedies). I've never seen tylenol, for instance, sold in gelatin free caplets.



all prescription capsules are made of gelatin, I am a pharmacist that's why I know.
However no one ever asked about the gelatin content in drugs, strange isn't it? icon_twisted.gif
Funny thing is, some of the Muslim friends of mine are actually pharmacists too, so they know all drug capsules are made of gelatin, they take drugs if they need to, but they never questioned about it.

BunglesNuNu Posted 19 Dec 2010 , 1:36pm
post #19 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkisInOkinawa

If you are trying to highlight something, try rubbing it very very lightly with Crisco, vegetable shortening and then dry dust. That should adhere. But you must be very sparing and smooth about it. Experiment and see if it works for you. I did this using a stencil on my tea cup cake in my gallery. The dusts adhered well for me.

Hope it works for you. thumbs_up.gif



that is a good idea, will try that next time! Thankx! thumbs_up.gif

BunglesNuNu Posted 19 Dec 2010 , 1:37pm
post #20 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by lizzycakes

So, you didn't flavor the buttercream at all?



no, because I was using chocolate ganache.

artscallion Posted 19 Dec 2010 , 2:23pm
post #21 of 24

Having been a pharmacy student at one point in my life, this gelatin capsule question interest me. So I did a little research...

Muslims are only forbidden to eat gelatin if it is the kind made with pig fat. They can eat gelatin made with seaweed, beef fat, etc. Also, not all muslims follow the letter of the law any more than all Christians observe the no-meat-on-Friday laws, or all Jews observe the no-shellfish or cloven-hoofed-animal laws.

Also, from their texts: "He hath only forbidden you dead meat, and blood, and the flesh of swine, and that on which any other name hath been invoked besides that of Allah. But if one is forced by necessity, without wilful disobedience, nor transgressing due limits,- then is he guiltless. For Allah is Oft-forgiving Most Merciful."

So they recognize that, in some cases, ya gotta do what ya gotta do.

...the more you know...

cupcakes4u Posted 16 Feb 2011 , 8:29pm
post #22 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by PrivateNameHere

Quote:
Originally Posted by BunglesNuNu

Quote:
Originally Posted by myslady

off topic: what kind of fondant are you using? I have a muslim friend as well but she cannot eat fondant because of the gelatin in it. Just wondering if you found a gelatin free version?


I am using , as it says on the label it actually does not contain any gelatin.
One other note, as for gelatin, people never questioned about the gelatin content in the medicinal capsules, but they won't eat any food product that contains gelatin?
The key ingredients with any drug capsules are gelatin!


Good point. I have no idea. They do make gelatin-free caplets, but those are sold empty usually (for homemade remedies). I've never seen tylenol, for instance, sold in gelatin free caplets.




Hi i would like to reply to this as a muslim. The reason why we can have medicinal products which contains alcohol or gelatin is because a persons health and recovery is important it becomes an issue of perhaps even life and death(in extreme cases) and in general if you do not treat a disease or illness it becomes worse, we are allowed in these circumstances to have these products if nothing else is available and this is different to consumption of these products on a day to day basis as it would just be for leisure or enjoyment purposes, we all know alcohol is bad for you. Muslims do eat gelatin as long as it is derived from a halal (kosher)(permissible) source ie the animal itself is slaughtered in halal manner. hope this clears up any confusion.

Just as a note to you all, if you ever find any products which is kosher this would be suitable for muslims too

I do have to say as a muslim baker i have found ways to make my products suitable for all, ie no gelatin or alcohol in any of my products, it is sometimes very frustrating as i have to do a lot of research before i can go ahead with requests from customers, i am happy to share tips if ever you are in a pickle!

thanks

thanks

cake_architect Posted 16 Feb 2011 , 9:02pm
post #23 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by cupcakes4u

Quote:
Originally Posted by PrivateNameHere

Quote:
Originally Posted by BunglesNuNu

Quote:
Originally Posted by myslady

off topic: what kind of fondant are you using? I have a muslim friend as well but she cannot eat fondant because of the gelatin in it. Just wondering if you found a gelatin free version?


I am using , as it says on the label it actually does not contain any gelatin.
One other note, as for gelatin, people never questioned about the gelatin content in the medicinal capsules, but they won't eat any food product that contains gelatin?
The key ingredients with any drug capsules are gelatin!


Good point. I have no idea. They do make gelatin-free caplets, but those are sold empty usually (for homemade remedies). I've never seen tylenol, for instance, sold in gelatin free caplets.



Hi i would like to reply to this as a muslim. The reason why we can have medicinal products which contains alcohol or gelatin is because a persons health and recovery is important it becomes an issue of perhaps even life and death(in extreme cases) and in general if you do not treat a disease or illness it becomes worse, we are allowed in these circumstances to have these products if nothing else is available and this is different to consumption of these products on a day to day basis as it would just be for leisure or enjoyment purposes, we all know alcohol is bad for you. Muslims do eat gelatin as long as it is derived from a halal (kosher)(permissible) source ie the animal itself is slaughtered in halal manner. hope this clears up any confusion.

Just as a note to you all, if you ever find any products which is kosher this would be suitable for muslims too

I do have to say as a muslim baker i have found ways to make my products suitable for all, ie no gelatin or alcohol in any of my products, it is sometimes very frustrating as i have to do a lot of research before i can go ahead with requests from customers, i am happy to share tips if ever you are in a pickle!

thanks

thanks




thank you for enlightening us! much appreciated icon_biggrin.gif

Cupcations Posted 16 Feb 2011 , 11:02pm
post #24 of 24

As Cupcakes4u said Muslims can only eat gelatine or alcohol in cases where you have no choice such as medicine
As a muslim baker it is hard for us to find many products, such as fondant, dragees & even food coloring but that does not mean we don't bake, we always come up with "halal" substitutions
Unfortunately as artscallion said not all muslims go by this that's why a lot of bakers are surprised to hear about the whole gelatine/alcohol forbidden concept

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