3 Tiered Cake/do I Have To Use Dowel Rods??

Decorating By christybean Updated 15 Dec 2010 , 3:19pm by leily

christybean Posted 15 Dec 2010 , 1:43pm
post #1 of 7

Making a tiered cake for the first time. I plan on just one layer for each tier. Will I be able to get away without using rods for support? Also, can I place the cakes directly on the bottom tier or do I need to put the small cakes on cardboard or plastic rounds first??

Please help!

6 replies
aswartzw Posted 15 Dec 2010 , 1:59pm
post #2 of 7

Well, normally yes, you would dowel but since you only want to do 1 layer of cake for each tier, I don't really find it necessary (but I also don't really see the point of only doing 1 cake layer per tier).

So use this as practice and treat it as a real tier cake. Each tier gets its own "base" which is a cake plate. It gets iced and smoothed before stacking. The take dowels and cut them slightly (very slightly) higher than the cake but cut one dowel and cut all the others to its height for each individual tier based off the highest point of the cake tier (if not perfectly level). Stack. Repeat for next tier. Finish decorating.

-K8memphis Posted 15 Dec 2010 , 2:01pm
post #3 of 7

A general rule of thumb is that cakes need support for evey 4-6 inches of height. For a three tier where each tier is only one layer you could get away with no support or additional boards in between layers if the layers are no more than one and a half inches tall. And there' s no delivery. And you're serving where it was made.

But it just all depends. Describe the whole cake--no fillings right? What kind of cake and icing? How tall will each tier be????

But I would dowel and add the cardboard to support a third tier even if the bottom two tiers were only three inches tall at that point. Security.

Unless the tiers are 7x5x3 or less in size.

So you could get away with it all depends.

SugarFiend Posted 15 Dec 2010 , 2:29pm
post #4 of 7

I would recommend using using a support system, based on personal experience. I've always known that you should support every 4" of cake or so, and once tried to "get away with" a small section of a cake (4"x4"x6" tall) without support. I thought such a small section would be fine without support. WRONG! I crumbcoated it and left it to settle, and a few hours later - wouldn't ya know - that tiny section had collapsed. icon_sad.gif

I learned my lesson. icon_rolleyes.gif Now I support every 4", no matter what.

aswartzw Posted 15 Dec 2010 , 2:49pm
post #5 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by SugarFiend

I would recommend using using a support system, based on personal experience. I've always known that you should support every 4" of cake or so, and once tried to "get away with" a small section of a cake (4"x4"x6" tall) without support. I thought such a small section would be fine without support. WRONG! I crumbcoated it and left it to settle, and a few hours later - wouldn't ya know - that tiny section had collapsed. icon_sad.gif

I learned my lesson. icon_rolleyes.gif Now I support every 4", no matter what.




This was probably more so that you were using a 4" cake...those little things are troublesome. That or your BC.

There are so many cake recipes that call for 3-8" layers that its normal to me to stack that many with no dowels in it. There just is no reason.

-K8memphis Posted 15 Dec 2010 , 2:53pm
post #6 of 7

There's just a lot of variables.

leily Posted 15 Dec 2010 , 3:19pm
post #7 of 7

typically you want to do dowels with support every 4 vertical inches of cake as others mentioned.

I have however done what you're asking with this cake.
http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=7983

And i regretted it b/c it started to lean with the weight of the top cake. Thankfully it was cut into about 2 hours after completling so it wasn't that big of an issue (and it was for family) But i always dowel every 4", no matter what.

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