What In The...

Decorating By caked4life Updated 14 Dec 2010 , 12:28am by Manderly42

caked4life Posted 13 Dec 2010 , 2:52pm
post #1 of 26

Hello everyone icon_lol.gif

How in the world, on these cake shows, are they tossing around LARGE sheet cakes like paper and they are not breaking in half??? It's all I can do to tort mine without it breaking in half. Please share the secret!

25 replies
leah_s Posted 13 Dec 2010 , 2:57pm
post #2 of 26

If you're not gong to actually eat the cake you can overbake it. Easier to handle.

all4cake Posted 13 Dec 2010 , 3:14pm
post #3 of 26

keeping the parchment on the back (of course, removing it before icing), frozen/slightly frozen, as well as certain types of cake help with the durability aspect of being able to toss a cake around.

visionsofprisms Posted 13 Dec 2010 , 3:28pm
post #4 of 26

I work with full sheet cakes (grocery store size) all the time. I have probably the same difficulties as you. I find that when I freeze them to move them it is easier.

As for torting them, I saw a video on tube for it, and it was very helpful, but still have difficulties with torting may sheet cakes.

caked4life Posted 13 Dec 2010 , 3:51pm
post #5 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by all4cake

keeping the parchment on the back (of course, removing it before icing), frozen/slightly frozen, as well as certain types of cake help with the durability aspect of being able to toss a cake around.




I'm going to go with it being a much different type of cake than I bake. It didn't look frozen. It was very flexible, but didn't break in half. There was not parchment paper on the back, they lifted it and slapped it right down and started to ice.

visionsofprisms Posted 13 Dec 2010 , 4:22pm
post #6 of 26

I believe they use a dense sponge cake. like cake boss is always says he is using sponge.

cakelady2266 Posted 13 Dec 2010 , 4:48pm
post #7 of 26

I want to know how and why they are always transporting cakes stacked on these shows? Just curious.....

ThePurpleButterfly Posted 13 Dec 2010 , 4:51pm
post #8 of 26

I saw the exact same thing on Cake Boss yesterday and was like... what???.... that can't be moist. It must be dry.

3GCakes Posted 13 Dec 2010 , 5:17pm
post #9 of 26

I saw a special done at Disney World yesterday hosted by Guy Fieri and the baker was making a Yule log.

He had the ginormous sheet cake and it was really flexible because they subbed out a bunch of flour with corn starch. Guy was amazed at how the cake could be rolled up without breaking.

cakesmart Posted 13 Dec 2010 , 6:26pm
post #10 of 26

Didn't see the show, but imagine that was interesting to watch.

cakedoff Posted 13 Dec 2010 , 8:09pm
post #11 of 26

I know someone, personally, that won one of the major competitions. These cakes are made of all kinds of things and are NOT consumed. The cakes are destroyed after the taping ends.

Manderly42 Posted 13 Dec 2010 , 9:39pm
post #12 of 26

I heard that the cakes from the Cake Boss don't really taste all that great - that you are paying for the decorating. So it is probably more dry...?

cownsj Posted 13 Dec 2010 , 9:52pm
post #13 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by 3GCakes

I saw a special done at Disney World yesterday hosted by Guy Fieri and the baker was making a Yule log.

He had the ginormous sheet cake and it was really flexible because they subbed out a bunch of flour with corn starch. Guy was amazed at how the cake could be rolled up without breaking.




I saw that show. My first thought was how must it taste...., then I realized this was Disney and nothing was going out unless it's delicious.

cownsj Posted 13 Dec 2010 , 9:55pm
post #14 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manderly42

I heard that the cakes from the don't really taste all that great - that you are paying for the decorating. So it is probably more dry...?




I've heard pros and cons on the taste from people I know who have been there. I know someone who grew up around the corner from there and raves about his cakes and pastries. All I can say for sure is that it is a full scale, full time bakery that has been in business for 100 years. I don't think they'd still be there if their bakery products weren't good. And we all have different tastes....

aligotmatt Posted 13 Dec 2010 , 9:58pm
post #15 of 26

Cornstarch is what you use to make cake flour, so it makes sense to maybe sub out a little more.

I keep the parchment on the back as well, they transfer around really easy, flip them on top or slide them off and peel the parchment.

I've never been to Carlos Bakery, but my cousin is going to school in Hoboken and he has nothing but rave reviews about everything he has tasted there.

all4cake Posted 13 Dec 2010 , 10:05pm
post #16 of 26

The ones I've seen handled like that have all been yellow type cakes (I've not seen a chocolate layer handled in the same manner....seen them assembled into layers but not as 'roughly' as the yellow (whatever the yellow ones are)

cownsj Posted 13 Dec 2010 , 10:11pm
post #17 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by all4cake

but not as 'roughly' as the yellow (whatever the yellow ones are)




Foam rubber? icon_surprised.gif Just kidding, just kidding everyone

Melvira Posted 13 Dec 2010 , 10:49pm
post #18 of 26

Ok, I saw the Triple D Disney special too, (well, ok, only part of it) but when I pull up the recipe, there is no mention of cornstarch subbing. Is this the wrong recipe? Was there more than one Triple D Disney Special?

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/chocolate-and-coffee-yule-log-recipe/index.html

I am always fighting with my yule logs because I won't use a really dry cake, but the moist stuff likes to crack on ya.

And I'm cracking up about the foam rubber comment. Sometimes you gotta wonder.

Edited for a stupid typo. icon_rolleyes.gif

Debcent Posted 13 Dec 2010 , 10:50pm
post #19 of 26

icon_wink.gif cownsj your so funny!!

Melvira Posted 13 Dec 2010 , 10:53pm
post #20 of 26

Nevermind that question... I just read the comments under the recipe and this isn't even the recipe from Disney, although it is presented like it is. Then at the bottom it says it was provided by a viewer who "may not be a professional chef". That's horse crap.

cownsj Posted 13 Dec 2010 , 11:31pm
post #21 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Melvira

Ok, I saw the Triple D Disney special too, (well, ok, only part of it) but when I pull up the recipe, there is no mention of cornstarch subbing. Is this the wrong recipe? Was there more than one Triple D Disney Special?

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/chocolate-and-coffee-yule-log-recipe/index.html

I am always fighting with my yule logs because I won't use a really dry cake, but the moist stuff likes to crack on ya.

And I'm cracking up about the foam rubber comment. Sometimes you gotta wonder.

Edited for a stupid typo. icon_rolleyes.gif




Was it the episode with his family in it? I don't know if the commercials I've seen were for more than 1 episode or if they were different ones, but his family was in the one where the cornstarch was mentioned for the sponge used in the yule log. I know I heard that too.

Melvira Posted 13 Dec 2010 , 11:45pm
post #22 of 26

Yah, in the comments section under the recipe people were mentioning that the show said to sub some cornstarch. To me, posting the recipe they posted, under the heading of that show, is VERY dishonest and misleading. Even if at the bottom under the 'notes' they say this recipe was given by someone who may not be a professional chef. How many people made the recipe thinking they were going to get what they saw on TV? Who knows, this recipe might even be BETTER, but the point is that it is not honest to post it like that. I am losing respect for Food Network SO quickly. It's bad enough, some of the idiots they've given shows... Ugh. thumbsdown.gif

cownsj Posted 13 Dec 2010 , 11:57pm
post #23 of 26

Ok, looks like it's, "Guy's Fieri Disney Holiday - Special ". It's on again on the 24th & 25th. Here is more info on it: http://www.foodnetworktv.com/tv-shows/diners-drive-ins-dives-special/guys-fieri-disney-holiday-special.html

Here is a YouTube video of it. The segment on the Yule Log is about 5:34 into the video. The part about the corn starch is about 6:00. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Mv80ddvYcc&NR=1

Navyempress Posted 14 Dec 2010 , 12:00am
post #24 of 26

When you're going to roll a cake, you need to use a genoise recipe and roll it while still warm. There may be one or two cracks but technique could be to blame for those. Genoise is a sponge cake and it is flexible. You can line molds with it and I definitely wouldn't recommend any other type of cake for yule logs. I am flipping through my notes from my first Baking & Pastry class because I know I have a recipe we used several times in here somewhere.

Melvira Posted 14 Dec 2010 , 12:24am
post #25 of 26

Thanks to both of you! I end up using a cake that is not meant exactly for rolling, but I do it while it's warm and have pretty good results rolling it with a flour sack towel. But just once I'd like to find one that's still nice and moist, but rolls easily without the battle of wills between me and the durn cake! icon_cry.gif

Manderly42 Posted 14 Dec 2010 , 12:28am
post #26 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by cownsj

Quote:
Originally Posted by Manderly42

I heard that the cakes from the don't really taste all that great - that you are paying for the decorating. So it is probably more dry...?



I've heard pros and cons on the taste from people I know who have been there. I know someone who grew up around the corner from there and raves about his cakes and pastries. All I can say for sure is that it is a full scale, full time bakery that has been in business for 100 years. I don't think they'd still be there if their bakery products weren't good. And we all have different tastes....




I'm sure their other products are amazing. I'm talking about the big 3D carved specialty cakes you see them doing for the show. The ones with the extra pliable sponge cakes that don't seem to break or crumble.

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