How Do I Use Whitener In Fondant?

Decorating By zespri Updated 8 Dec 2010 , 10:22pm by zespri

zespri Posted 8 Dec 2010 , 8:23am
post #1 of 9

Has anyone had any experience using whitener gel in fondant? If so, how much should I use? And would I just use it the same way as any other colour gel?

Any advice is greatly appreciated!

8 replies
Coral3 Posted 8 Dec 2010 , 8:41am
post #2 of 9

Can I ask what you need to whiten your fondant for?...white fondant is pretty white to start with - or are you trying to lighten a colour that is too dark?

zespri Posted 8 Dec 2010 , 8:43am
post #3 of 9

Hi Coral. I've made some chocolate fondant, the white chocolate is not truly white, it's an off-white colour, but I'd really like it to be pure white.

CakeMule Posted 8 Dec 2010 , 9:16am
post #4 of 9

I have a similar question - I'm making a wedding cake - chocolate sponge with chocolate buttercream filling, but it needs to be white so I'm planning to cover it with whitened white moulding chocolate. I coincidentally saw this being done on a cookery show, so I've seen the results and now it works. The instructions on the side of the vial of powdered whitener says it can be added to melted white chocolate when making it into moulding chocolate, but there is no advice on how much to use. Can anyone advise? I'd be really grateful.

Occther Posted 8 Dec 2010 , 11:44am
post #5 of 9

Zespri - in the US, you can buy Mercken's chocolate in super white. They are more expensive than the regular white chocolate wafers but help keep the fondant whiter.

BlakesCakes Posted 8 Dec 2010 , 10:00pm
post #6 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Occther

Zespri - in the US, you can buy Mercken's chocolate in super white. They are more expensive than the regular white chocolate wafers but help keep the fondant whiter.




Yes, these are very white.

If you use real white chocolate, then it's very off white. Sometimes, a few dots of violet gel/paste kneaded into the modeling chocolate will make it whiter.

Yes, you can add powdered color--white--to the melted chocolate. I don't know of any specific formula except "to the desired shade".

Good luck!
Rae

zespri Posted 8 Dec 2010 , 10:09pm
post #7 of 9

icon_eek.gif really?! I want to go home immediately and try it, how can this be possible?! When you say violet, are we talking a specific brand/shade? I have a sugarflair one, that I'm pretty sure is called 'violet'.

We can't get Merkins here I'm afraid, so that's not an option.

The whitener I have is a gel. Perhaps tonight I'll experiment with some of that, and some violet. I love experimenting!


[quote="BlakesCakes"]

Quote:
Originally Posted by Occther

If you use real white chocolate, then it's very off white. Sometimes, a few dots of violet gel/paste kneaded into the modeling chocolate will make it whiter.


BlakesCakes Posted 8 Dec 2010 , 10:20pm
post #8 of 9

I generally use my Americolor violet. It's basic color theory--yellow is opposite violet on the color wheel, so they cancel each other out.

It works very, very well with buttercream made with butter.

With the modeling chocolate, it may diminish the yellow, but not bring it to a bright white because white chocolate is a more neutral, translucent off-white--not a true yellow. The whiteners contain titanium dioxide, which not only whitens, but also increases the opacity of the product.

Rae

zespri Posted 8 Dec 2010 , 10:22pm
post #9 of 9

maybe a bit of both! I'll do three experiments. One with a dab of violet, one with a dab of white, then one with a dab of each.

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