Chocolate Cake Didnt Turn Out The Way I Thought It Would :(

Decorating By elysa Updated 6 Dec 2010 , 4:34pm by elysa

elysa Posted 6 Dec 2010 , 2:10pm
post #1 of 19

There is this chocolate and strawberry cake recipe ive had my eye on for a while now and i thought it would be perfect to make for my friends birthday, as it feeds 60 people and she loves chocolate and strawberry.
Here is a link to the recipe: http://www.taste.com.au/recipes/21602/rich+chocolate+and+strawberry+cake

I am pretty new to cooking but i do love a challenge which is why i chose this cake.

Here is a picture of my cake on the link below, it looked great until i cut it open! I am planning on doing the whole cake including the chocolate panels if i can be sure it will turn out good.
http://s1217.photobucket.com/albums/dd381/elysa-24/

I made a trial cake first in a round tin and thank god i did because it turned out very dense, and not what i expected at all.
Could it be the type of chocolate i used? It was just a home brand label, the cake didn't taste the greatest, it was like the mixture had gone hard and chewy. To me, it looked more like a slice.
I was thinking maybe its the way the cakes supposed to be, but im not sure.
Another thing i did was follow the oven instructions for the two cakes. i left the cake in there fo about 45 mins then put a skewer in it which came out clean so i took the cake out. Could the cake be so dense because it was in the oven for too long?

If anyone knows why my cake turned out this way please let me know!

Also if you have any suggestions on a different type of chocolate cake i could use with the same recipe (to replace the cake part of the recipe) that would be great. icon_smile.gif

Thank you!

18 replies
sweetpea223 Posted 6 Dec 2010 , 2:42pm
post #2 of 19

It seems like the batter where you add in the eggs and the rest to the chocolate was not beaten enough to incorporate air, that's why the cake became so dense. I've seen other recipes that beat the eggs, sugar and the rest of the ingredients, then folded the melted chocolate in. If you search in epicurious.com for chocolate cake recipes..you'll find instructions similar to the ingredients of the recipe you posted.

I hope my explanation makes sense .

imagenthatnj Posted 6 Dec 2010 , 2:47pm
post #3 of 19

I don't know where you're located, but that Australian recipe might be more of an australian mud cake (dense, almost like a brownie). If that's not what you intended, you might want to look for another recipe for the cake part. I hope some Australians come to your rescue (I remember a member here Evoir, who you might be able to PM).

Here's a link to a thread:
http://cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopic-665610-0-days0-orderasc-.html

I make this chocolate cake recipe from Sky High (moist and fluffly), but there are plenty of others in the forum (of course, don't do the peanut butter filling and the glaze).

http://smittenkitchen.com/2008/08/chocolate-peanut-butter-cake/

elysa Posted 6 Dec 2010 , 2:52pm
post #4 of 19

Ohh. Ye it makes sense. I didnt spend too much time whisking it actually.
I just really want this cake to work!
If i use a different recipe i want to be sure it will hold up the small cake on top. So i want it dense but also nice and moist/fresh tasting at the same time.
Thanks for your help, ill have a look at that website. icon_smile.gif

elysa Posted 6 Dec 2010 , 2:56pm
post #5 of 19

Ye im in Australia..
Ok thanks i shall definantly send a pm icon_smile.gif

It was really disappointing coz i thought the cake looked pretty good but it was horrible!

-K8memphis Posted 6 Dec 2010 , 2:59pm
post #6 of 19

Now this recipe uses a box mix but it's a killer cake. The ice cream cake from Cake Mix Doctor. You use any cake mix and a melted pint of ice cream and three eggs if memory serves. I used chocolate cake mix and chocolate ice cream for one layer in a tier with brownie bottom cheesecake as the other layer. So I needed a denser cake to matchy match with the bb cc.

So it is denser without being mud fudgey. But even if you don't wanna use a mix you could dabble with that idea maybe with a recipe.

Some pints of ice cream melt down to less than 16 ounces so add in enough milk or cream to make up the difference.

elysa Posted 6 Dec 2010 , 3:08pm
post #7 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by -K8memphis

Now this recipe uses a box mix but it's a killer cake. The ice cream cake from Cake Mix Doctor. You use any cake mix and a melted pint of ice cream and three eggs if memory serves. I used chocolate cake mix and chocolate ice cream for one layer in a tier with brownie bottom cheesecake as the other layer. So I needed a denser cake to matchy match with the bb cc.

So it is denser without being mud fudgey. But even if you don't wanna use a mix you could dabble with that idea maybe with a recipe.

Some pints of ice cream melt down to less than 16 ounces so add in enough milk or cream to make up the difference.




Thats exactly were my problem is.. Its heaps too 'mud fudgey' as you say!
I'd rather use a recipe so i might try out that idea with the ice cream.
I just want my cake to work!!

LindaF144a Posted 6 Dec 2010 , 3:13pm
post #8 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by elysa

Ye im in Australia..
Ok thanks i shall definantly send a pm icon_smile.gif

It was really disappointing coz i thought the cake looked pretty good but it was horrible!




Brown sugar in a recipe will always give a denser cake than granulated sugar or extra fine sugar. Brown sugar has molasses also, so the result is a "heavier" cake. I say it in quotes because it is not exactly the right word, but all I can think of right now. It does depart a richer taste, but you will see that most cakes and cookies do a mixture of both brown and granular because brown sugar alone can make it so dense. You are better off finding a mud recipe with either granulated sugar or a mixture of brown/granular.

Plus adding all the chocolate too will not make a light cake. I bet you got the results your were supposed to get with this recipe.

-K8memphis Posted 6 Dec 2010 , 3:16pm
post #9 of 19

My go to chocolate cake recipe is the Hershey Perfectly Perfect Chocolate cake one--I've never done it with the ice cream but here's a start anyhow--but there's tons of great chocolate cake recipes.

http://www.hersheys.com/recipes/184/HERSHEY'S%20%22PERFECTLY%20CHOCOLATE%22%20Chocolate%20Cake.aspx#

HERSHEY'S "PERFECTLY CHOCOLATE" Chocolate Cake

Skill Level:BeginnerPrep Time:15 MinutesNutrition Info
Ingredients
2 cups sugar
1-3/4 cups all-purpose flour
3/4 cup HERSHEY'S Cocoa
1-1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1-1/2 teaspoons baking soda
1 teaspoon salt
2 eggs
1 cup milk
1/2 cup vegetable oil
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
1 cup boiling water
"PERFECTLY CHOCOLATE" CHOCOLATE FROSTING (recipe follows)
Directions
1. Heat oven to 350°F. Grease and flour two 9-inch round baking pans.


2. Stir together sugar, flour, cocoa, baking powder, baking soda and salt in large bowl. Add eggs, milk, oil and vanilla; beat on medium speed of mixer 2 minutes. Stir in boiling water (batter will be thin). Pour batter into prepared pans.


3. Bake 30 to 35 minutes or until wooden pick inserted in center comes out clean. Cool 10 minutes; remove from pans to wire racks. Cool completely. Frost with "PERFECTLY CHOCOLATE" CHOCOLATE FROSTING. 10 to 12 servings.

VARIATIONS:
ONE-PAN CAKE: Grease and flour 13x9x2-inch baking pan. Heat oven to 350° F. Pour batter into prepared pan. Bake 35 to 40 minutes. Cool completely. Frost.

THREE LAYER CAKE: Grease and flour three 8-inch round baking pans. Heat oven to 350°F. Pour batter into prepared pans. Bake 30 to 35 minutes. Cool 10 minutes; remove from pans to wire racks. Cool completely. Frost.

BUNDT CAKE: Grease and flour 12-cup Bundt pan. Heat oven to 350°F. Pour batter into prepared pan. Bake 50 to 55 minutes. Cool 15 minutes; remove from pan to wire rack. Cool completely. Frost.

CUPCAKES: Line muffin cups (2-1/2 inches in diameter) with paper bake cups. Heat oven to 350°F. Fill cups 2/3 full with batter. Bake 22 to 25 minutes. Cool completely. Frost. About 30 cupcakes.


"PERFECTLY CHOCOLATE" CHOCOLATE FROSTING

1/2 cup (1 stick) butter or margarine
2/3 cup HERSHEY'S Cocoa
3 cups powdered sugar
1/3 cup milk
1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Melt butter. Stir in cocoa. Alternately add powdered sugar and milk, beating to spreading consistency. Add small amount additional milk, if needed. Stir in vanilla. About 2 cups frosting.

elysa Posted 6 Dec 2010 , 3:19pm
post #10 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by LindaF144

Quote:
Originally Posted by elysa

Ye im in Australia..
Ok thanks i shall definantly send a pm icon_smile.gif

It was really disappointing coz i thought the cake looked pretty good but it was horrible!



Brown sugar in a recipe will always give a denser cake than granulated sugar or extra fine sugar. Brown sugar has molasses also, so the result is a "heavier" cake. I say it in quotes because it is not exactly the right word, but all I can think of right now. It does depart a richer taste, but you will see that most cakes and cookies do a mixture of both brown and granular because brown sugar alone can make it so dense. You are better off finding a mud recipe with either granulated sugar or a mixture of brown/granular.

Plus adding all the chocolate too will not make a light cake. I bet you got the results your were supposed to get with this recipe.




Wow i cant believe that people would actually eat a cake so dense if thats how its supposed to be. It did seem like a tone of chocolate.
Do you think if i altered the recipe by replacing the brown sugar with like caster sugar it would turn out lighter?
Or would it not be enough support then to hold up the little cake?
Thanks heaps for your help by the way, ive been searching the internet for hours and this site is great icon_smile.gif

elysa Posted 6 Dec 2010 , 3:26pm
post #11 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by -K8memphis

My go to chocolate cake recipe is the Hershey Perfectly Perfect Chocolate cake one--I've never done it with the ice cream but here's a start anyhow--but there's tons of great chocolate cake recipes.

http://www.hersheys.com/recipes/184/HERSHEY'S%20%22PERFECTLY%20CHOCOLATE%22%20Chocolate%20Cake.aspx#

HERSHEY'S "PERFECTLY CHOCOLATE" Chocolate Cake

Skill Level:BeginnerPrep Time:15 MinutesNutrition Info
Ingredients
2 cups sugar
1-3/4 cups all-purpose flour
3/4 cup HERSHEY'S Cocoa
1-1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1-1/2 teaspoons baking soda
1 teaspoon salt
2 eggs
1 cup milk
1/2 cup vegetable oil
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
1 cup boiling water
"PERFECTLY CHOCOLATE" CHOCOLATE FROSTING (recipe follows)
Directions
1. Heat oven to 350°F. Grease and flour two 9-inch round baking pans.


2. Stir together sugar, flour, cocoa, baking powder, baking soda and salt in large bowl. Add eggs, milk, oil and vanilla; beat on medium speed of mixer 2 minutes. Stir in boiling water (batter will be thin). Pour batter into prepared pans.


3. Bake 30 to 35 minutes or until wooden pick inserted in center comes out clean. Cool 10 minutes; remove from pans to wire racks. Cool completely. Frost with "PERFECTLY CHOCOLATE" CHOCOLATE FROSTING. 10 to 12 servings.

VARIATIONS:
ONE-PAN CAKE: Grease and flour 13x9x2-inch baking pan. Heat oven to 350° F. Pour batter into prepared pan. Bake 35 to 40 minutes. Cool completely. Frost.

THREE LAYER CAKE: Grease and flour three 8-inch round baking pans. Heat oven to 350°F. Pour batter into prepared pans. Bake 30 to 35 minutes. Cool 10 minutes; remove from pans to wire racks. Cool completely. Frost.

BUNDT CAKE: Grease and flour 12-cup Bundt pan. Heat oven to 350°F. Pour batter into prepared pan. Bake 50 to 55 minutes. Cool 15 minutes; remove from pan to wire rack. Cool completely. Frost.

CUPCAKES: Line muffin cups (2-1/2 inches in diameter) with paper bake cups. Heat oven to 350°F. Fill cups 2/3 full with batter. Bake 22 to 25 minutes. Cool completely. Frost. About 30 cupcakes.


"PERFECTLY CHOCOLATE" CHOCOLATE FROSTING

1/2 cup (1 stick) butter or margarine
2/3 cup HERSHEY'S Cocoa
3 cups powdered sugar
1/3 cup milk
1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Melt butter. Stir in cocoa. Alternately add powdered sugar and milk, beating to spreading consistency. Add small amount additional milk, if needed. Stir in vanilla. About 2 cups frosting.




This recipe sounds perfect! We dont have much hershey brand stuff in Australia but i sure if i used cadbury product it would still turn out similar.
So this cake is fine for layering and isnt too dense?
Sorry for all the questions im very new to this!

brincess_b Posted 6 Dec 2010 , 3:29pm
post #12 of 19

cake doesnt support cake - you need dowels and a cardboard.
i have made mud cake before, and although really good, and if its just a 4 or 6 inch and i was depserate i might take the chance. but thats like a 'small' 7/ 8 inch cake! use the supports!
if you are new to baking i wouldnt bother messing about with a recipe, id just find one that works straight off the bat. i use a chocolate victoria sponge, but its maybe lighter than you want.
xx

-K8memphis Posted 6 Dec 2010 , 3:30pm
post #13 of 19

This recipe as written makes a nice chocolate cake. If you need something denser than a regular (US) cake and less dense than a mud cake--then y'know sub in the ice cream for the milk & water or something--I like to combine recipes & test & see what happens. So this was just a suggestion for a possible test platform.

But I like this cake very much as written and Cadbury cocoa powder would be fine I'm sure.

elysa Posted 6 Dec 2010 , 3:33pm
post #14 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by -K8memphis

This recipe as written makes a nice chocolate cake. If you need something denser than a regular (US) cake and less dense than a mud cake--then y'know sub in the ice cream for the milk & water or something--I like to combine recipes & test & see what happens. So this was just a suggestion for a possible test platform.

But I like this cake very much as written and Cadbury cocoa powder would be fine I'm sure.




It does, i was looking at the picture and it looks soo yummy!
I think doing a few tests would probarbly be a good idea, luckily i did a test cake before putting everything together and bringing it to my friends birhtday!

Thanks a lot!

elysa Posted 6 Dec 2010 , 3:36pm
post #15 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by brincess_b

cake doesnt support cake - you need dowels and a cardboard.
i have made mud cake before, and although really good, and if its just a 4 or 6 inch and i was depserate i might take the chance. but thats like a 'small' 7/ 8 inch cake! use the supports!
if you are new to baking i wouldnt bother messing about with a recipe, id just find one that works straight off the bat. i use a chocolate victoria sponge, but its maybe lighter than you want.
xx




Thats what i thought but the recipe doesnt mention using dowels unless i missed that part...
If i really cant do it ill make a previous chocolate cake which turned out great but i hope i can make something work im just so determined to make this cake!

LindaF144a Posted 6 Dec 2010 , 4:04pm
post #16 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by elysa

Quote:
Originally Posted by brincess_b

cake doesnt support cake - you need dowels and a cardboard.
i have made mud cake before, and although really good, and if its just a 4 or 6 inch and i was depserate i might take the chance. but thats like a 'small' 7/ 8 inch cake! use the supports!
if you are new to baking i wouldnt bother messing about with a recipe, id just find one that works straight off the bat. i use a chocolate victoria sponge, but its maybe lighter than you want.
xx



Thats what i thought but the recipe doesnt mention using dowels unless i missed that part...
If i really cant do it ill make a previous chocolate cake which turned out great but i hope i can make something work im just so determined to make this cake!




I agree with brincess b. Better to just keep trying other recipes rather than tinker with this one. Especially if you are new to baking. After you have a few recipes, and correct cake batter making process, under your belt then you can start tinkering. In the meantime, there are so many recipes out on the internet there is no need to tinker. Just mark it up to experience and move on to the next one.

elysa Posted 6 Dec 2010 , 4:08pm
post #17 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by LindaF144

Quote:
Originally Posted by elysa

Quote:
Originally Posted by brincess_b

cake doesnt support cake - you need dowels and a cardboard.
i have made mud cake before, and although really good, and if its just a 4 or 6 inch and i was depserate i might take the chance. but thats like a 'small' 7/ 8 inch cake! use the supports!
if you are new to baking i wouldnt bother messing about with a recipe, id just find one that works straight off the bat. i use a chocolate victoria sponge, but its maybe lighter than you want.
xx



Thats what i thought but the recipe doesnt mention using dowels unless i missed that part...
If i really cant do it ill make a previous chocolate cake which turned out great but i hope i can make something work im just so determined to make this cake!



I agree with brincess b. Better to just keep trying other recipes rather than tinker with this one. Especially if you are new to baking. After you have a few recipes, and correct cake batter making process, under your belt then you can start tinkering. In the meantime, there are so many recipes out on the internet there is no need to tinker. Just mark it up to experience and move on to the next one.




Ye i think thats what ill end up doing, as long as it tastes good im sure it will be fine.

Thank you so much for all your help icon_smile.gif

-K8memphis Posted 6 Dec 2010 , 4:21pm
post #18 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by elysa

... the cake didn't taste the greatest, it was like the mixture had gone hard and chewy....If anyone knows why my cake turned out this way please let me know!...




Quote:
Originally Posted by elysa

I didnt spend too much time whisking it actually.




And the idea to making a cake is to make an emulsion a smoothy smooth mixture of ingredients. So I think you mentioned somewhere--you din want to wisk too long or something. Yes not too long but long enough.

So it's a balance--but you are on the right track with testing testing testing. But egg molecules have to be stretched out around the sugar crystals in order to avoid being rubbery in the final product.

elysa Posted 6 Dec 2010 , 4:34pm
post #19 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by -K8memphis

Quote:
Originally Posted by elysa

... the cake didn't taste the greatest, it was like the mixture had gone hard and chewy....If anyone knows why my cake turned out this way please let me know!...



Quote:
Originally Posted by elysa

I didnt spend too much time whisking it actually.



And the idea to making a cake is to make an emulsion a smoothy smooth mixture of ingredients. So I think you mentioned somewhere--you din want to wisk too long or something. Yes not too long but long enough.

So it's a balance--but you are on the right track with testing testing testing. But egg molecules have to be stretched out around the sugar crystals in order to avoid being rubbery in the final product.




Ye for sure. I think i might of rushed it a fair bit and it made a huge difference. I have definantly learnt from my mistakes.
I'll try another test for this cake again and take time with it but if it fails me again i think what ill do it find a recipe for a large chocolate cake just one layer. Then i can still place the chocolate panels around the outside and strawberries in the middle!

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