Questions On Making Windows For Gingerbread?

Baking By ChristineJ Updated 8 Dec 2010 , 8:43pm by navelgazer

ChristineJ Posted 5 Dec 2010 , 2:12am
post #1 of 12

Hi Everyone. I made a gingerbread house, and I drilled out all of the windows in it, and want to put glass like windows in so I can put a battery tea light in there so it will light up. My question is ...What or how would you make see thru windows. All help is appreciated. Thank you all for replies

11 replies
Bonnell Posted 5 Dec 2010 , 2:16am
post #2 of 12

Gelatin will work. Pour it very, very thin and when it's dry you can cut it with scissors.

artscallion Posted 5 Dec 2010 , 2:25am
post #3 of 12

crush hard candies. Place prebaked gingerbread on a baking sheet sprayed with pam. Make sure you place it inside of house down. sprinkle crushed candy in window area. Use more than you think you'll need. bake until melted. Cool completely on sheet. I particularly like doing this with butterscotch candies. You can't see through to see the empty inside and bulbs. All you see is a nice warm light through the windows, kind of like firelight.

writersblock15 Posted 5 Dec 2010 , 2:36am
post #4 of 12

Here's one way to add glass windows.
http://howtogingerbread.blogspot.com/search/label/Windows

artscallion Posted 5 Dec 2010 , 2:52am
post #5 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by writersblock15

Here's one way to add glass windows.
http://howtogingerbread.blogspot.com/search/label/Windows




Yes, that would be the method I just described. icon_rolleyes.gificon_wink.gificon_smile.gif

icer101 Posted 5 Dec 2010 , 3:17am
post #6 of 12

gelatin sheets also.

ChefAngie Posted 5 Dec 2010 , 3:26am
post #7 of 12

I use gelatin sheets, crushed hard candies-lifesavers or if I have the time pour your own-hard candy recipe-makes beautiful water for ponds and rivers.
Happy Baking and Decorating,
Chef Angie

Corrie76 Posted 5 Dec 2010 , 3:57am
post #8 of 12

I make a batch of hard candy and pour it onto tinfoil-(under the foil should be a large cutting board so you don't ruin the finish on your countertop!) Very quickly,using a spatula, I spread the hard candy puddle into a rectangular sheet (between 1/8 to 1/4 inch thick) and after it's cooled somewhat (about 30 sec-one minute) I use a pizza cutter to cut the rectangle into sqarish shapes- actually it doesn't really matter what shape- as long as they are smaller than the inside wall and larger than the window opening of the gingerbread. You will find that the middle area of the cooling candy will need to be re-cut a few times... the middle takes longest to cool and sometimes the initial cuts "heal" back together...it's not important if the cutter can't make it all the way through the candy, the important thing is to get it scored so that when the candy is cooled, it will break on the score-marks. after it's cooled, gently break the candy into windows and then use royal icing to glue the windows on the interior side of the gingerbread cut-out. Making windows this way is one of the funnest parts of the gingerbread house for me, I've tinted the cany all different colors (like purple for halloween) and I've even gently scored cooling candy so it looks like panes of leaded glass. Also, you can sprinkle edible glitter on the candy windows to make them look frosted (be sure to wait for the candy to cool-otherwise the heat melts the glitter into nothingness!)
LOL icon_lol.gif I'm very passionate about candy windows so sorry if this was so long! I'm making gingrbread houses this week so I'll take some good pictures and post!

adonisthegreek1 Posted 5 Dec 2010 , 4:03am
post #9 of 12

Like the others, I have used gelatin and gelatin sheets.

ChristineJ Posted 6 Dec 2010 , 12:30am
post #10 of 12

Thank you to all that replied. Very good Ideas. If I were to go to gelatin, What would be the glue to put stick them to the windows? royal icing? Thank you

sewsugarqueen Posted 6 Dec 2010 , 12:45am
post #11 of 12

Try putting coarse sugar on parchment/silpat and heat in oven to melt. Then let cool.

navelgazer Posted 8 Dec 2010 , 8:43pm
post #12 of 12

I cut out the windows in the raw dough but leave them in place - it's makes them easy to punch out when the bread dries and leaves nice sharp edge. Then I just use melted sugar and pour in the holes while the piece is laying on alum foil. Hardens nicely and looks like old-timey glass....

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