Airbrushing

Decorating By aac81 Updated 21 Dec 2010 , 3:23am by Evoir

aac81 Posted 3 Dec 2010 , 10:52am
post #1 of 15

Hi I am new to this site and there is too much for me to look through. There might already be a post about this but I dont have the time to look through them all.
I recently airbrushed a cake I made in blue. I did it in my bathroom and when I was finished I realised that the whole bathroom was BLUE!
My question is, how do I contain the mist from the airbrush? I only have a small apartment and the bathroom seemed logical but I cant keep having to clean the whole bathroom every time I make a cake.
Any help would be appreciated.

14 replies
halleyec Posted 3 Dec 2010 , 12:02pm
post #2 of 15

I use a large cardboard box turned on its side and this seems to save my kitchen getting painted!

sechrestloans Posted 3 Dec 2010 , 12:07pm
post #3 of 15

I take a large cardboard box also cut on one side so I can make almost a little room to put the cake on with one side open and just turn the cake as needed while airbrushing. I also put a plastic table cloth underneath the whole thing and extend it out as far as I can on the counter or table. I still manage to get the airbrush on things sometimes..LOL

ibmoser Posted 3 Dec 2010 , 4:18pm
post #4 of 15

Cardboard boxes do help, as does turning down the pressure if that is an option for your system. Too much pressure will give you lots of overspray.

MommaDukes Posted 3 Dec 2010 , 4:54pm
post #5 of 15

I have an airbrush and haven't used it yet for this very reason. I am afraid of having my kitchen covered in mist. I was thinking about a project board with a sheet over the top and bottom this was I can fold it up and put away.

JanetBme Posted 3 Dec 2010 , 9:05pm
post #6 of 15

Look up on line how to airbrush (not on cakes) and it will give you the basics how to control the airbrush and not have such a big problem. You just have to practice the control- It makes a difference.

I've seen this alot- people who just get the airbrush and blow- tend to stand back and aim differently than people who practice doing the basic techniques.

Also- a 3 wing display board helps behind your work...and cake safe makes a really great fan/booth that works!

Turn off all ceiling fans.

aac81 Posted 4 Dec 2010 , 7:58am
post #7 of 15

Thanks everyone, I will definately try the cardboard box next time.
JanetBme- I agree that since it was the first time i have used the airbrush my technique is not very good. practice makes perfect i guess...icon_smile.gif

Evoir Posted 4 Dec 2010 , 8:17am
post #8 of 15

I tried all the above suggestions when I forst got my airbrush. It was only after I noticed a fine dust of lustre in the adjacent room's horizontal surfaces, that I decided to buy a small booth and extraction unit with filter. I would highly recommend spending the $100 or so getting one if you plan on doing any regular airbrushing.

aac81 Posted 6 Dec 2010 , 7:58am
post #9 of 15

I just found blue mist on my ceiling fans in both the loungeroom and the bedroom!

UberSpoonyG Posted 8 Dec 2010 , 1:42am
post #10 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by aac81

I just found blue mist on my ceiling fans in both the loungeroom and the bedroom!



lol...you might have air pressure up a bit too high...there shouldn't be a whole lot of over-spray involved unless you are realllly putting lot of paint in air!! I have a box made for a 20 inch fan that has furnace filters that you can place in front or behind fan to get any residual over-spray. I have designed these portable Air Filters for baker friends of mine to take on location like I do. Keep Caking!!

aac81 Posted 8 Dec 2010 , 11:40am
post #11 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by UberSpoonyG

Quote:
Originally Posted by aac81

I just found blue mist on my ceiling fans in both the loungeroom and the bedroom!


lol...you might have air pressure up a bit too high...there shouldn't be a whole lot of over-spray involved unless you are realllly putting lot of paint in air!! I have a box made for a 20 inch fan that has furnace filters that you can place in front or behind fan to get any residual over-spray. I have designed these portable Air Filters for baker friends of mine to take on location like I do. Keep Caking!!


uberspooney, I noticed on your website you said that you have the pressure down quite low, I had mine at about 28-30. Is that right? what do you have your's at?

tiggy2 Posted 8 Dec 2010 , 12:24pm
post #12 of 15

Here are Earlene's instructions for building a folding air brush cabinet http://www.earlenescakes.com/AirbrushCabInst.html

JanetBme Posted 9 Dec 2010 , 3:56am
post #13 of 15

[/quote]uberspooney, I noticed on your website you said that you have the pressure down quite low, I had mine at about 28-30. Is that right? what do you have your's at?[/quote]

28- 30 psi is WAY more than you need. You must work on fondant mostly- or you'd have found out quite quickly that it is too high.

For just about every double action the range is probably 12- 22 or so... If it is a single action closer to 12. If it is a top cup(gravity feed) you can stay on the lower side probably 20 ish. If it is a side cup, then it takes more pressure to suck the color up so it.

Good thing is, if you cut down the pressure you will be able to work within an inch or two from the surface of your cake, and you won't have color everywhere!

aac81 Posted 9 Dec 2010 , 8:55am
post #14 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by JanetBme


uberspooney, I noticed on your website you said that you have the pressure down quite low, I had mine at about 28-30. Is that right? what do you have your's at?[/quote]

28- 30 psi is WAY more than you need. You must work on fondant mostly- or you'd have found out quite quickly that it is too high.

For just about every double action the range is probably 12- 22 or so... If it is a single action closer to 12. If it is a top cup(gravity feed) you can stay on the lower side probably 20 ish. If it is a side cup, then it takes more pressure to suck the color up so it.

Good thing is, if you cut down the pressure you will be able to work within an inch or two from the surface of your cake, and you won't have color everywhere![/QUOTE]thanks JanetBme. I will try that lower pressure next time. I have only just started airbrushing, have only done one cake and it was fondant. I think it will take me awhile to get used to it and I may have to practice on paper or something

Evoir Posted 21 Dec 2010 , 3:23am
post #15 of 15

DEFINITELY practice on paper! An d practice with the paper held at different angles, from flat to 90 degrees.

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