I Need Help With Modeling Chocolate

Decorating By cakesdelight Updated 5 Dec 2010 , 1:03am by mandyloo

cakesdelight Posted 3 Dec 2010 , 2:07am
post #1 of 30

Ive tried making this before 2 weeks ago and both times I did it it came out worng...(maybe i read the recipe wrong? but both times..., i dont know.)

I just need help; if anyone has a good recipe that you can share with me and give me some helpful tips that'll be AWESOME...

heres the recipe I have... 10oz (1 bag) chocolate melts (wilton brand) and 3 Tables spoons of Light corn syrup. {melt the chocolate and add the 3TBS to the chocolate and mix together well. spread on a baking sheet thats covered with wax paper. and let dry for few hours uncovered}

I don't know where I got this recipe from, I wrote it in my notebook back in 2006 BUT NEVER tried to do it until 2 weeks ago, and I failed! I have a consultation for Sunday late afternoon that requires a sample ivory rose made of this chocolate clay/modeling clay...

THANK YOU FOR HELPING! icon_smile.gif

29 replies
Bonnell Posted 3 Dec 2010 , 2:18am
post #2 of 30

It seems to me that your recipe is off. The recipe I've used is 14 oz. chocolate to 1/3 c. light corn syrup. Make sure the corn syrup is warmed before adding to the melted chocolate. Good luck.

mysweetsugar75 Posted 3 Dec 2010 , 3:00am
post #3 of 30

Just finished a cookie class at Country Kitchen tonight and the recipe we were given for modeling chocolate was: 1 lb. melting chocolates, melt - then add in 2/3 cup corn syrup

playingwithsugar Posted 3 Dec 2010 , 3:12am
post #4 of 30

I have heard of others having trouble making the paste from the Wilton melts.

The recipe off the Wilton site is the 14 oz bag of melts, with 1/3 cup light corn syrup.

Theresa icon_smile.gif

tastyart Posted 3 Dec 2010 , 3:37am
post #5 of 30

For white modeling chocolate I use 4oz. white chocolate and 1-1 1/2 Tbs of corn syrup. It is an ivory color. When you start to work it, it requires significant kneading. The rose I made with it is in my photos. Hope that helps.

Apti Posted 3 Dec 2010 , 3:38am
post #6 of 30

cakesdelight, it is probably not you, it is probably the Wilton Candy Melts. I am now on a mission to boycott those awful candy melts. I took a candy class from my Wilton cake instructor in October (loved her and the cake classes). She had to use Wilton products and nothing went right for 2 hours. The Wilton candy melts, should be renamed: Wilton Will Not Melt Candy Melts.

I just took another Holiday Candies class from a private instructor, Kathleen Lange of Confectionary Chalet. She used Guittard A'Peels and the difference was astounding! I had tried and tried to get the correct consistency (like pancake batter) with the Wilton and now don't believe it is even possible. I told Kathleen I'd purchased about $30 worth of Wilton when they were on sale at 25% off. She sighed and said that the craft stores and Wilton put them on sale when they are at the end of their 6 months shelf life so they can restock. The older a candy melt is, the harder to melt.

I am going to use as many of the Wilton Melts as possible on my gingerbread houses--after all, I don't have to worry about them melting in a heated room, do I? Then, the rest I'm giving away to an after-school care program.

Loucinda Posted 3 Dec 2010 , 3:47am
post #7 of 30

CHECK YOUR CORN SYRUP!!! The off brands have WATER in them and will make your chocolate clay seize. I did a search, and KARO is the only one that didn't have water in it.

You can also use glucose (food glucose), it works very well too.

cheatize Posted 3 Dec 2010 , 3:59am
post #8 of 30

My recipe doesn't tell me to spread it on a baking sheet. I would look for another recipe online.

playingwithsugar Posted 3 Dec 2010 , 4:05am
post #9 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheatize

My recipe doesn't tell me to spread it on a baking sheet. I would look for another recipe online.




We did this in school. That way, when it's done maturing overnight, it's easier to start kneading it. You just break a piece off, knead it, then add some more on.

Much easier than beating a big lump of it with a rolling pin.

Theresa icon_smile.gif

cakesdelight Posted 3 Dec 2010 , 5:20am
post #10 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Loucinda

CHECK YOUR CORN SYRUP!!! The off brands have WATER in them and will make your chocolate clay seize. I did a search, and KARO is the only one that didn't have water in it.

You can also use glucose (food glucose), it works very well too.




I have the Karo Brand and its the light syrup.... But I will try the glucose also to see with one I will like to work with best. icon_smile.gif

cakesdelight Posted 3 Dec 2010 , 5:46am
post #11 of 30

Thanks Everyone! Im going to use a different brand of chocolates and use the right measurments of warm corn syrup. icon_biggrin.gif


Loucinda: how much glucose do I use? I want to try this method too. TIA icon_smile.gif

EVERYONE: thumbs_up.gifthumbs_up.gifthumbs_up.gifthumbs_up.gifthumbs_up.gif

cakesdelight Posted 3 Dec 2010 , 5:48am
post #12 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by tastyart

For white modeling chocolate I use 4oz. white chocolate and 1-1 1/2 Tbs of corn syrup. It is an ivory color. This is the same recipe I used on my blog recently. When you start to work it, it requires significant kneading. The rose I made with it is in my photos. Hope that helps.




you have a few roses in your photos but I saw the milk chocolate one you made; they are all so very pretty. icon_biggrin.gifthumbs_up.gif

tastyart Posted 3 Dec 2010 , 2:18pm
post #13 of 30

Thanks! All the roses in my photos are made with modeling chocolate. Even the silver one.

Tclanton Posted 3 Dec 2010 , 2:50pm
post #14 of 30

What do you use to paint them? I see you use petal dust on some, but how do you make one silver. Special paint I am assuming, but can you give me the name please? Thanks, T

tastyart Posted 3 Dec 2010 , 3:14pm
post #15 of 30

I dusted them with luster dust. For the silver one I tinted the modeling chocolate gray and dusted it with the Nu Silver luster dust.

Tclanton Posted 3 Dec 2010 , 3:21pm
post #16 of 30

When you tint your chocolate - what are you using for the color?

tastyart Posted 3 Dec 2010 , 3:22pm
post #17 of 30

I use gel colors.

Tclanton Posted 3 Dec 2010 , 3:44pm
post #18 of 30

Oh cool - thank you very much!!!

PianoDiva Posted 3 Dec 2010 , 6:38pm
post #19 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by playingwithsugar

Quote:
Originally Posted by cheatize

My recipe doesn't tell me to spread it on a baking sheet. I would look for another recipe online.



We did this in school. That way, when it's done maturing overnight, it's easier to start kneading it. You just break a piece off, knead it, then add some more on.

Much easier than beating a big lump of it with a rolling pin.

Theresa icon_smile.gif





I'm about to make modeling chocolate for the first time and want to make sure I'm doing this right. I have 14 oz of white candy melts that are NOT Wilton and my Karo corn syrup. After melting the chocolate, warming the syrup and mixing the two together, I put it on a baking sheet and let it sit overnight? Is that right?

I'm making a baby shower cake and the mama-to-be wants a pink elephant on top of it, thus the need for the modeling chocolate. Thanks for any help you can give!

tastyart Posted 3 Dec 2010 , 8:50pm
post #20 of 30

I just wrap it in plastic wrap and refrigerate.

PianoDiva Posted 3 Dec 2010 , 8:54pm
post #21 of 30

I made the modeling chocolate about a half hour ago. I used white chocolate candy melts and Karo light corn syrup. As suggested, I warmed the syrup before adding it to the melted chocolate. Everything went great until about 30 seconds after I added the corn syrup. At that point the whole thing became grainy. I could see a bunch of oil, which I'm assuming is from the higher fat content of the white chocolate, but am clueless as to the grainy texture. All my utensils were bone-dry so water couldnt' be the culprit. Any ideas?

tastyart Posted 3 Dec 2010 , 9:00pm
post #22 of 30

Don't give up on it until you let it rest and then knead it. You can dab it with paper towel to absorb some of the oil. One recipe I had said to roll it out on newsprint paper to absorb the excess oil.

Loucinda Posted 3 Dec 2010 , 9:31pm
post #23 of 30

Don't over stir it...just a few swipes with a spatula to mix the two. Then put it on some plastic wrap, let it cool, then wrap and leave on the counter overnight. Next day it is ready to use, knead and go!

Loucinda Posted 3 Dec 2010 , 9:36pm
post #24 of 30

When using the glucose, I use half as much of it as I do chocolate. 16 oz. chocolate, 8 oz. glucose. I prefer this to the Karo recipe, it just seems to work better.

Here are some of my roses and orchids - and a bow/wrap all done with the choc/glucose mix.

http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=1833883

http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=1653859

Apti Posted 3 Dec 2010 , 10:09pm
post #25 of 30

ok. I've looked at the links and photos and websites of you experienced chocolate rose and bow makers and have to ask: Why on earth would anyone use fondant?

If you can do the same stuff with chocolate modeling clay, why would you use fondant? Most people think fondant tastes "weird". Do the chocolate roses and bows and orchids and figures taste like chocolate?

The big thing I'm always seeing/hearing is "everything on this cake is edible!!!". I think that is cake decorating code for "this won't hurt you if you eat it", but in reality, NOBODY is EVER going to "eat it". I understand the need for "edible only" on cakes. Example: You use pretty plastic bling diamonds and forget to take a couple off the cake--that's an accident waiting to happen.

Why doesn't everybody use modeling chocolate? Do the roses taste like candy bar chocolate? Does everybody eat them and smile? Help--I'm confused.....

cakesdelight Posted 3 Dec 2010 , 11:10pm
post #26 of 30

Everyone has been real helpful! I'm not so worried about this anymore... I'll be making the chocolate tomorrow morning so that in the morning on Sunday I can make the roses... We have the heater on since is cold in Ohio, and dont want the roses to loose their shape.... THANK YOU ALL! icon_smile.gif

metria Posted 3 Dec 2010 , 11:18pm
post #27 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apti

ok. I've looked at the links and photos and websites of you experienced chocolate rose and bow makers and have to ask: Why on earth would anyone use fondant?

If you can do the same stuff with chocolate modeling clay, why would you use fondant? Most people think fondant tastes "weird". Do the chocolate roses and bows and orchids and figures taste like chocolate?

The big thing I'm always seeing/hearing is "everything on this cake is edible!!!". I think that is cake decorating code for "this won't hurt you if you eat it", but in reality, NOBODY is EVER going to "eat it". I understand the need for "edible only" on cakes. Example: You use pretty plastic bling diamonds and forget to take a couple off the cake--that's an accident waiting to happen.

Why doesn't everybody use modeling chocolate? Do the roses taste like candy bar chocolate? Does everybody eat them and smile? Help--I'm confused.....




i'm not particularly crazy about eating straight-up modeling chocolate. it doesn't taste like candy bar chocolate to me, but more like tootsie rolls. i also have "hot hands", and i have to put down the modeling chocolate so it can come back to a better temperature after working with it for a while. with fondant, i don't have to stop.

Loucinda Posted 5 Dec 2010 , 12:29am
post #28 of 30

I have "hot hands" also, and you cannot use the modeling chocolate in the summertime, it cannot handle the heat/humidity at all. In winter, game on!

I do mix it half and half with fondant, and love working with that.

greengyrl26 Posted 5 Dec 2010 , 12:45am
post #29 of 30

I have hot hands too, which makes for a giant mess when I work with modeling chocolate. I LOVE to use it for my 3D cakes though! icon_wink.gif

mandyloo Posted 5 Dec 2010 , 1:03am
post #30 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakesdelight

Ive tried making this before 2 weeks ago and both times I did it it came out worng...(maybe i read the recipe wrong? but both times..., i dont know.)

I just need help; if anyone has a good recipe that you can share with me and give me some helpful tips that'll be AWESOME...

heres the recipe I have... 10oz (1 bag) chocolate melts (wilton brand) and 3 Tables spoons of Light corn syrup. {melt the chocolate and add the 3TBS to the chocolate and mix together well. spread on a baking sheet thats covered with wax paper. and let dry for few hours uncovered}

I don't know where I got this recipe from, I wrote it in my notebook back in 2006 BUT NEVER tried to do it until 2 weeks ago, and I failed! I have a consultation for Sunday late afternoon that requires a sample ivory rose made of this chocolate clay/modeling clay...

THANK YOU FOR HELPING! icon_smile.gif



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