Allergic To Nuts And Eggs... What To Do?

Lounge By JackiesCreations Updated 6 Dec 2010 , 12:08am by JackiesCreations

JackiesCreations Posted 3 Dec 2010 , 1:03am
post #1 of 10

Hi fellow CCers! I am planning on making a special cake/cupcakes/cookies for my son's class as a farewell gift. Only thing is, one boy is allergic to both nuts and eggs? I don't want him to miss out, but I haven't a clue where to start? Do I just use the flour etc I normally use just minus the eggs? And what about the nuts? Don't most things have nuts in them? Like oil? Etc? Sorry, I need help because I would hate to make something for him then he gets a reaction! That would be sooo bad!!!

Thanks in advance everyone! And I welcome all suggestions (recipes etc).

icon_smile.gif

9 replies
tracy394 Posted 3 Dec 2010 , 1:21am
post #2 of 10

There is a great website I use. It's www.allrecipes.com.

ClassyCat Posted 3 Dec 2010 , 1:43am
post #3 of 10

This topic is right up my alley. The #1 reason I became interested in cake decorating is because my first DS has been allergic to eggs and peanuts/nuts since age 2. Personally, I've taught my son never to eat homemade baked goods from anyone due to it being so risky. But if the allergic child in your son's class is going to be eating your snack, then you need to be very careful about every ingredient you use. You may want to speak with his mother first~ she may have some suggestions, may be able to tell you a recipe she uses, or she may decide she'll send in her own homemade treat for him to eat instead (this is what I do).

I have a recipe that I really love, and people who eat my son's birthday cakes always seem to like it:

CHOCOLATE APPLESAUCE CAKE

1 1/2 cups sifted flour (King Arthur brand is what I'm comfortable using)
3/4 cup sugar (Dominos)
1/4 cup cocoa powder (Hershey's is safe)
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 cup applesauce (Motts natural unsweetened)
1/2 cup water
1/2 cup oil (vegetable or canola oil, I just use store brand)
1 T vinegar
1 teaspoon vanilla (McCormicks)

Sift flour, sugar, cocoa, baking soda and salt into mixing bowl. Add remaining ingredients, stir until moistened. Pour into greased 8" square pan. Bake at 350 degrees for 30-35 minutes. Serves 9.

JackiesCreations Posted 3 Dec 2010 , 1:55am
post #4 of 10

Thank you tracy394 for sharing that website. And thank you ClassyCat for sharing your thoughts and the wonderful recipe. I think I will definitely speak to the boy's mum first just to be on the safe side, and perhaps show her your recipe so she knows (if she allows it) what I will be preparing for her son.

One more question ClassyCat, when baking the cake, is it safe to use cake release? I just want to make sure everything is done correctly. Also, I will see what brands we have here in NZ as alternatives to what you use. Do I just look for traces of nuts and eggs in the ingredients section? Are you able to tell me what is in the King Arthur brand and the other ingredients that I really would need to be careful with?

Sorry!! I really appreciate your input! TIA xo

MJoycake Posted 3 Dec 2010 , 2:36am
post #5 of 10

I think it's lovely that you want to accommodate this child and include him in the celebration. I'd definitely talk to his mother and see what she says. My own daughter has celiac as well as an oat allergy - I don't let her eat others' baked goods, and I always send something special that she can eat during group celebrations. Best of luck with however you end up going about it!

ClassyCat Posted 3 Dec 2010 , 11:12pm
post #6 of 10

When it comes to things like flour, I worry about cross contamination. The flour itself may be safe, but if it's made on the same equipment as peanut flour, it could become dangerous. Even with "safe" recipes, your kitchen could cause cross-contamination if you use bowls, spoons, or surfaces that have traces of the allergen on them (ie~ you made a peanut butter sandwich earlier that day and a trace of the oil is left on your countertop).

I have a feeling when you speak with the child's mom, she'd be more than happy to provide a safe snack for her child and then you can go about making your own treat without having to worry as much (as long as you don't make a peanut butter filling or put nuts in brownies or something).

Let us know how this all turns out, and what you make!! icon_biggrin.gif

JackiesCreations Posted 3 Dec 2010 , 11:18pm
post #7 of 10

Thank you. That's a very very good point. I wouldn't want to risk it. I'll have a word with the Mum next week and see from there. Thanks everyone for all your input! Much appreciated! Will let you all know what I do in the end, and post pics icon_smile.gif

JRAE33 Posted 5 Dec 2010 , 6:58pm
post #8 of 10

As a mom who has three kids with food allergies including nuts, peanuts, eggs, and dairy (my oldest son has 13 different food allergies)..I can tell you that the mom will very much appreciate you wanting to include her child and will surely be able to tell you what to do. Degree's of allergies vary, and you don't know unless you ask what the child can tolerate. My oldest son had to be rushed to the er after eggs the first time, yet he can have eggs baked into things. So just ask. She'll surely be more than happy to help you out, and thrilled you thought of her child icon_smile.gif

CWR41 Posted 5 Dec 2010 , 11:57pm
post #9 of 10

Did you know that you can substitute a can of soda for eggs?

Soda Pop: A regular-sized (12 oz.) can of soda pop can be used as a substitution for 3 eggs in your baking recipes. Additionally, one regular-sized (12 oz.) can of soda pop can be substituted for the oil/egg combo required by most boxed cake mixes.
From this website: http://www.vegkansascity.com/substitutions.html

Our college-age daughter told us about it and says it works perfectly
(although, I don't know if the above link is the same place she read of it).

JackiesCreations Posted 6 Dec 2010 , 12:08am
post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by CWR41

Did you know that you can substitute a can of soda for eggs?

Soda Pop: A regular-sized (12 oz.) can of soda pop can be used as a substitution for 3 eggs in your baking recipes. Additionally, one regular-sized (12 oz.) can of soda pop can be substituted for the oil/egg combo required by most boxed cake mixes.
From this website: http://www.vegkansascity.com/substitutions.html

Our college-age daughter told us about it and says it works perfectly
(although, I don't know if the above link is the same place she read of it).


Wow, that's awesome! I must say, I've never heard of that before! Thanks for sharing!

And thank you JRAE33! It's nice to know your perspective on this subject! icon_wink.gif

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%