Evenly Spaced Dots

Decorating By sherry-o Updated 16 Dec 2010 , 10:39am by Dayti

sherry-o Posted 1 Dec 2010 , 6:22pm
post #1 of 25

I love little dots on cakes! They look so pretty on a cake. My question is how do you get them perfectly spaced?? I have heard of using a pizza pan with holes for the top of the cake, but what about the sides of the cake? Thanks in advance!

24 replies
-K8memphis Posted 1 Dec 2010 , 6:26pm
post #2 of 25

Eyeball it.

icer101 Posted 1 Dec 2010 , 6:31pm
post #3 of 25

hi, all cake suppliers have these mats that help you do this. earlene moore has them on her site. And yes, eyeball it , if you can visualize that good. lol! i can,t sometimes. i have the mats i am talking about. hth

grandmomof1 Posted 1 Dec 2010 , 6:48pm
post #4 of 25

I use the small earlene's impression mats for mine. They are not very expensive.
http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-photo_1866296.html

cakesmart Posted 1 Dec 2010 , 7:46pm
post #5 of 25

I saw Buddy do dots on one of his shows. He started on the bottom row, spaced the dots where he wanted them (basically eyeballed it). Then for the next rows, he placed the dots in between the ones on the lower row.

leah_s Posted 1 Dec 2010 , 7:51pm
post #6 of 25

I use the Wilton divider mat and a ruler.

metria Posted 1 Dec 2010 , 9:21pm
post #7 of 25

i love the perfectly spaced dots too but i have yet to try it! i have the wilton mat (somewhere). but what about vertically? i was thinking i could evenly tape toothpicks to a note card and make impressions on where they should go all around the cake. does that make sense? anyone else have a suggestion on how to space them evenly vertically?

zespri Posted 1 Dec 2010 , 9:23pm
post #8 of 25

one of those compasses you use in school?

CWR41 Posted 2 Dec 2010 , 12:22am
post #9 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakesmart

I saw Buddy do dots on one of his shows. He started on the bottom row, spaced the dots where he wanted them (basically eyeballed it). Then for the next rows, he placed the dots in between the ones on the lower row.




This is what I do, it's quick and easy.

Jayde Posted 2 Dec 2010 , 12:27am
post #10 of 25

I eyeball it or if they have to be in a line, I take a quilting tape measure and wrap it around the cake and secure it with a toothpick. Then take another toothpick and make your dots lightly. Remove tape measure and pipe your dots over the pin pricks. Totally easy.

mom2twogrlz Posted 2 Dec 2010 , 12:41am
post #11 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jayde

I eyeball it or if they have to be in a line, I take a quilting tape measure and wrap it around the cake and secure it with a toothpick. Then take another toothpick and make your dots lightly. Remove tape measure and pipe your dots over the pin pricks. Totally easy.




I like that idea. I will have to remember it!!!

cheatize Posted 2 Dec 2010 , 4:05am
post #12 of 25

I get my son to do it. He has a degree in Digital Media Design, so kerning is his "thing." I just cannot be that precise. I don't have it in me. LOL

sccandwbfan Posted 2 Dec 2010 , 5:16am
post #13 of 25

I'm not good at eyeballing yet, so I use the wilton cake dividing circle to guide me.

leah_s Posted 2 Dec 2010 , 5:31am
post #14 of 25

Seriously, a ruler.

Hold it vertically and line it up by the Dividing mat markings.

Normita Posted 2 Dec 2010 , 5:57am
post #15 of 25

What wilton mat?

lecrn Posted 2 Dec 2010 , 6:08pm
post #16 of 25

Just get the impression mat. It is very cheap & your results will be perfect. No headache!

tipsytaartje Posted 2 Dec 2010 , 11:50pm
post #17 of 25

eye-balling it with a little measuring works fine with me :Y I did a little cake here, it's 10cm I think. I started with the bottom line of dots, then I measured where the next line of dots should be and I made a tiny hole with a needle where the dot should be. I did measure every dot, but like every 5 dots or so, so I'd know I didn't go to far up or down icon_wink.gif

http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=1793339

With the mat, doesn't the pattern get stretched out when you place it around your cake? I cannot imagine that you can get a very straight pattern with the mat...

grandmomof1 Posted 3 Dec 2010 , 12:50am
post #18 of 25

With earlene's mats, I wait until cake is iced, either with fondant or buttercream, and just press against the side of the cake with the mat. There is no distortion with that. I have been fortunate the times I have used the 1-inch patterned mats that it even matched perfectly on the back side of the cake. No complaints from me. I like it to be as simple as I can get it.

lanana Posted 3 Dec 2010 , 1:15am
post #19 of 25

Impression mats work he best and they have different dots spaced mats.

tipsytaartje Posted 3 Dec 2010 , 10:10am
post #20 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by grandmomof1

and just press against the side of the cake with the mat. There is no distortion with that.




owwww ok, did not think that's the way to do it.
Do you think it works also with sponge cake? Here in Hollands most people want spongecake, and then the one without butter... So when I press against my cake I'm afrraid that I'll mess it up!

grandmomof1 Posted 3 Dec 2010 , 4:51pm
post #21 of 25

In reference to tipsytaartje, I have never worked with sponge cake, but I would not be afraid to try it on any cake I make.

leah_s Posted 3 Dec 2010 , 5:11pm
post #22 of 25
matthewkyrankelly Posted 3 Dec 2010 , 5:40pm
post #23 of 25

Eyeballing it isn't that hard. Like cutting a pie.

Start at one side on the bottom. Then put a dot on the bottom opposite side(North and South). After that, place the East and West dots by splitting the difference. Then fill in by always splitting the leftover space.

Work your way up the cake with dots the same way. A ruler can be helpful to get the vertical spacing right for the second, third, etc. rows. However, you only need to measure two or three on each row to get the height right for the rest.

Of course, for a perfect wedding cake, you can get right in there with the ruler for each dot.

caked4life Posted 16 Dec 2010 , 3:46am
post #24 of 25
Dayti Posted 16 Dec 2010 , 10:39am
post #25 of 25

You can also cut a strip of baking paper/parchment the height and circumference of your cake. Draw the points on the paper as you would like them on the cake. You can also make sure your points will be evenly spaced so you don't end up with a "back" to your cake. Wrap the paper around the cake and hold the ends with sellotape, use a scriber/needle to make holes through the paper into the cake, remove paper, and pipe your dots over the top. You can keep the paper for future cakes too, to save you doing the drawing all over again.

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%