Cookies4kids Posted 1 Dec 2010 , 1:00pm
post #1 of

I use a homemade dipping choc. recipe that has paraffin, good ghiradelli semi sweet choc chips and 1 sq. of unsweetened baking choc. I did a ton of chocolate covered cherries and when I took them out, they had this chalky white look. What causes this???? Thanks

11 replies
brincess_b Posted 1 Dec 2010 , 1:36pm
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wiki explains the science - more complicated than i thought! http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chocolate_bloom
my understanding has always been that its about temperature - why storing chocolate is so important.
xx

VickeyC Posted 1 Dec 2010 , 1:49pm
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"BLOOM
Fat or sugar rising onto the surface of chocolate. Fat bloom is a white cast of cocoa butter that comes from poor tempering or exposure of the chocolate to incorrect temperatures. Chocolate with a fat bloom is fine to eat, but it may taste dry and crumbly. A sugar bloom occurs when sugar crystals form on the surface. Sugar bloom occurs when there is a temperature shock for the chocolate. Condensation forms and dissolves into the chocolate, creating rough crystals on the surface which give the chocolate an unattractive appearance. Sugar bllom is unattractive but all right to eat."

This was taken from the Glossary in the book "All About Candy Making" by Autumn Carpenter. HTH thumbs_up.gif

BlakesCakes Posted 1 Dec 2010 , 11:10pm
post #4 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cookies4kids

I use a homemade dipping choc. recipe that has paraffin, good ghiradelli semi sweet choc chips and 1 sq. of unsweetened baking choc. I did a ton of chocolate covered cherries and when I took them out, they had this chalky white look. What causes this???? Thanks




I'd venture to say that you didn't temper the chocolate properly or you overheated it at some point in the process.

Bloom is a sign of "out of temper" chocolate, meaning that the crystals in the chocolate aren't lined up properly, allowing the fats to escape easily from the emulsion and rise to the top.

I have 2 strong recommendations:

Paraffin is no longer considered an appropriate agent for making chocolate smooth for dipping and for hardening--it was all that was available years ago, but times have changed. It's not really "food safe", even though it is non-toxic. The proper modern product is paramount crystals (a palm kernel oil product) that can be found online and in larger cake decorating stores.

If you don't want to take the extra step of actually tempering your chocolate, you can try using real chocolate--your Ghiardelli + baking chocolate--along with some dark cocoa candy melts. A mix of 2/3 real + 1/3 melts works very well. Melt them together and if they're too thick for dipping add in some paramount crystals a little at a time. I find that using the candy melts, I often don't need the crystals icon_wink.gif

HTH
Rae

Cookies4kids Posted 2 Dec 2010 , 1:35am
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Thanks for all the help.

cheatize Posted 2 Dec 2010 , 3:58am
post #6 of

I tried sprinkling Paramount crystals into melted chocolate once. They never melted/incorporated. Is there some special way to do this that I don't know?

BlakesCakes Posted 2 Dec 2010 , 4:26am
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I'd assume that your chocolate was just too cold.

If your chocolate was liquid, warm, and above 85 degrees--obviously warmer is even better--it should have melted easily when stirred into the chocolate.

Rae

tavyheather Posted 2 Dec 2010 , 5:14am
post #8 of

Hey Rae...

(sorry to hijack)

what about 2/3 real choc and 1/3 melting choc (I use Merkens)...or have u only tried candy melts (I realize they're completely different)

BlakesCakes Posted 2 Dec 2010 , 5:35am
post #9 of

Rainbow Wafers by Merkens are candy melts. It's just the company name.
Several companies make candy melts/confectionary coating--Wilton, Wilbur, Clausen, Ghirardelli, Guittard, and probably others that I'm not aware of.
Some people claim to see a difference between brands of "fake" chocolate, but I interchange brands all the time and haven't noticed any real difference unless one or the other is old product.

Merkens makes "tempering chocolate"----real chocolate with cocoa butter in it that requires tempering. You wouldn't want to use that because you're back in the tempering game again. If it has cocoa butter in it, it needs to be tempered.

Rae

tavyheather Posted 2 Dec 2010 , 9:20pm

Thanks, Rae!

then I wonder what I've been buying b/c it's not candy coating and it didn't need tempering...I coated choc covered strawberries and piped R's with it and it never bloomed...

just looked it up..They are called melting choc (wafers) but you're right..they dont require tempering...omg I had no idea...they tasted soooo good!

Back to the topic at hand...so cocoa butter is what requires tempering but if u mix the choc (w/ cocoa butter) with candy melts it cancels out that requirement? crazy! How neat!

BlakesCakes Posted 2 Dec 2010 , 9:57pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by tavyheather


Back to the topic at hand...so cocoa butter is what requires tempering but if u mix the choc (w/ cocoa butter) with candy melts it cancels out that requirement? crazy! How neat!




Well, I don't think a bona fide chocolatier would want to hear it that way, but, yes, that's pretty much the story.

The candy melts contain oils other than cocoa butter and those oils don't require tempering. Adding them to real chocolate seems "fool" it into staying in temper--as long as you don't overheat either the candy melts or the real chocolate. If you get either one over 105 degrees F, you'll still get bloom.

I usually melt in the microwave in a microwave safe PLASTIC BOWL in short burst at 50% power until 90% melted and then stir well to finish off the melting. The bottom of the bowl and the chocolate feels no warmer than body temp when finished.

If I melt over a double boiler, I make sure that the upper metal bowl is a tight fit to the pot holding the water. I boil the water and then turn off the heat THEN I put the bowl over it and add the chocolate. No steam gets near the chocolate that way. The gentle warmth of the hot water will melt the chocolate easily and it won't get too warm.

Rae

tavyheather Posted 2 Dec 2010 , 10:10pm

totally understand...I take pride in things being authentic and not cheating for a "lesser" product...

but I haven't had the best of luck with tempering chocolate so any help to avoid disaster will be wonderful!

Thanks for all the help and insight, Rae!

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