Notter Pastry School?

Decorating By missydavis1976 Updated 2 Dec 2010 , 3:04pm by -K8memphis

missydavis1976 Posted 28 Nov 2010 , 2:55pm
post #1 of 11

Hello fellow cakers! I am wondering if anyone here has any exerpience with Notter School of Pastry Arts? I am considering starting there in January. Also, if you are a successful baker/cake artist/pastry chef, etc, where did you get your formal education (or did you get one at all)? Thanks for any input.

Missy

10 replies
playingwithsugar Posted 28 Nov 2010 , 5:30pm
post #2 of 11

We have members who have taken classes there, as I have seen it mentioned before. I hope they see this and respond for you.

Theresa icon_smile.gif

missydavis1976 Posted 29 Nov 2010 , 7:20pm
post #3 of 11

Thanks, Theresa icon_smile.gif I hope they see this and respond, too!

I think I should clarify that I meant did those of you who have had career success get 'formal' educations versus being an apprentice/learning through job experience or being self taught. Didn't mean to make it sound like anyone was 'uneducated' lol!

TartletteTreats Posted 30 Nov 2010 , 2:10pm
post #4 of 11

I haven't actually heard of Notter, but I am currently in Pastry School at a state community college (awesome and cheap). I don't think school is a requirement to be a good cake decorator, but I have learned so much about the actual baking process as well as basic business principles. I also learn a lot from my continuous internet addiction to this site icon_smile.gif

sewsugarqueen Posted 30 Nov 2010 , 6:10pm
post #5 of 11

My daughter seriously considered going to Notter Pastry school and we researched it. Notter, himself, is top of the line, for sugar work, chocolates, cakes and pastries. He has coached teams in competitions.
Now are you going there to update skills or to get a certificate that can help with salary on job?
The teachers for their continuing education classes are also top of the line.
My daughter wanted a associate's degree so decided not to go there but plans on taking some of his con ed classes. To my knowledge the school is not associated with state of Florida community colleges-- I think that is the big drawback.

missydavis1976 Posted 1 Dec 2010 , 3:21pm
post #6 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by resmiff2

I haven't actually heard of Notter, but I am currently in Pastry School at a state community college (awesome and cheap). I don't think school is a requirement to be a good cake decorator, but I have learned so much about the actual baking process as well as basic business principles. I also learn a lot from my continuous internet addiction to this site icon_smile.gif




I learn a ton from this site, too! I am here every day checking the forums, articles, recipes, and getting inspiration from other people's work and experience. It's an invaluable tool!

I wish there was a community college near me that offered the classes I want, but none do. They offer a culinary certificate, and a couple offer two year associate programs in baking and pastry arts, but they don't really compare to Notter. The culinary certificates are inexpensive, but don't focus on all the skills I want/need to learn. I love all things culinary, but I want my actual business to be focused on high end baking/pastry. Glad you're enjoying your experience at your college, though! icon_wink.gif

missydavis1976 Posted 1 Dec 2010 , 3:27pm
post #7 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by sewsugarqueen

My daughter seriously considered going to Notter Pastry school and we researched it. Notter, himself, is top of the line, for sugar work, chocolates, cakes and pastries. He has coached teams in competitions.
Now are you going there to update skills or to get a certificate that can help with salary on job?
The teachers for their continuing education classes are also top of the line.
My daughter wanted a associate's degree so decided not to go there but plans on taking some of his con ed classes. To my knowledge the school is not associated with state of Florida community colleges-- I think that is the big drawback.




I'm going to get a certificate to help me with salary. I have heard oodles of good things about the continuing education classes they offer, but there's not a whole lot on their baking and pastry arts diploma. It's a relatively new program at the school, from what I understand. I have managed to glean some information off the internet, though. I guess I was just hoping that with such a large community of cake decorators, someone here would have some first had experience. icon_smile.gif

I had an interview with the director of admissions a couple days ago and he thinks I'm a good fit for the school. I agree, so I've submitted my application and am going back tomorrow for my financial aid appointment. Assuming everything goes as planned, I'll be started on January 31st! I'm very excited!

-K8memphis Posted 1 Dec 2010 , 4:50pm
post #8 of 11

<<<Graphic truth alert>>>

<<<<Click away from here if you don't want it straight up>>>


So before he want to culinary school my son was working as a cook and getting $9-$10 an hour. When he graduated magna cum at a cordon bleu school he was making $9-$10 an hour not to mention $35,000 in debt for the schooling--the extra loans for living expenses put it over $50k. (It was not my idea!)

Most of the time the 'good fit' with a culinary school is if you can qualify for the loans.

You can get good networking from it. You can have fun, you can learn tons--but the idea of it impacting your salary is not a reality. If you have practical experience in addition to the schooling it can maybe help you get hired and like I said the networking can help you get opportunities but better pay? No ugh uh.

Whatever you do, get opinions other than the admissions director's. This is culinary school 101. There are no jobs for new grads that pay more than the same jobs they could get if they could get 'em before they went in. Not like as for a school teacher or an engineer, those professions have definite pay increases for completing school--not so in the food industry.

Also--new grads might not have the skill set and speed for a commercial facility so having a degree can be a liability due to the fact that culinary school does not prepare one for the real world of slicing and dicing in a real kitchen.

Perhaps one or two colleges do but far and away the vast majority do not. There are numerous newspaper and online articles about this--people stuck paying off huge huge debts and the schooling does not afford them the job opportunities to get the bucks needed to pay it off--those better paying jobs do not exist for the graduate.

Google around and find some articles.

missydavis1976 Posted 2 Dec 2010 , 1:58pm
post #9 of 11

K8memphis,

Thank you for your candor. I have, in fact, read articles that say basically what you've just said. I have researched. I am not the type person who jumps into anything blindly. One of the reasons I posted the question here about Notter School was to see if I could come across anyone who's gone there and gotten a really good job afterwards. According to the admissions director, they place a lot of their graduates in the five star hotels and resorts in and around Disney world (which is near where I live), but, as you said, I'd like to hear that from some actual graduates, not just someone who's trying to enroll another student. Other than salary options after shool, though, I want to learn everything they teach at Notter, from pulled and blown sugar showpieces to production baking. I would like to own my own shop eventually, and obviously the more knowledge I have behind me, the better. So, even if I can't get a better paying job from someone else afterwards, the knowledge I gain will be useful. True, I will be about $13,000 in debt after pastry school, but I think it's a good investment in myself.

-K8memphis Posted 2 Dec 2010 , 2:58pm
post #10 of 11

James Roselle studied under Notter--I mean it's gonna be fantastic and a hotel job is awesome 'cause there's great benefits. But good for you for not buying the admission director's bladeebla.

I mean sure you can get a job but think about it, think about the food industry. The money is out there perhaps if you are brilliant and if you are crafty and if you can hold on long enough. But not at first.

Get a nice gig as an assistant in pastry? Maybe if you 'got the skills'. That's speed speed speed and accuracy. Hotel work is making/plating the same 500 portions over and over and over. You don't get that skill in school.

My Chef-boy who worked in fine dining at Michelin starred places, he's in finance now. His knees went out from the long days and nights. Unlike most he stayed with the cooking for years but he had no life outside the kitchen. It's back breaking work.

Wow I would love to go to that school!

Eyes wide open--Good for you!

-K8memphis Posted 2 Dec 2010 , 3:04pm
post #11 of 11

The ultimate point is not who got placed where.
The ultimate point is how many jobs exist compared to how many openings there are and how many students are bing popped out, lastly what is the pay. There's many more students than openings--'cause there's school all over the country.

If you could walk into a fine dining restaurant right now and get and hold down a gig on the kitchen team then you have a better chance of getting placed and making it after you get this intense specific training.

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