No Matter What I Do The Liners Still Peel Away....

Baking By cakesrpretty Updated 17 Jan 2011 , 7:38am by scp1127

cakesrpretty Posted 26 Nov 2010 , 12:24pm
post #1 of 34

It seems like no matter what I do my liners peel away. I have been using the same vailla cupcake recipe for years and now it seems everytime the liners peel away.....I am soooo frusterated. I am delivering an order today and they look horrible...no time to redo them.

33 replies
brincess_b Posted 26 Nov 2010 , 12:33pm
post #2 of 34

what kind of liners are they. some are better than others, and some are just a waste of money.
might look better to put them inside a second liner once baked.
xx

elliegails Posted 26 Nov 2010 , 12:57pm
post #3 of 34

I have wondered the same thing. Only happens from time to time, but how frustrating. Looking forward to hints from others...

scp1127 Posted 29 Nov 2010 , 9:50am
post #4 of 34

I started using only Reynolds in my business and NEVER one pulled away paper. My recipes are very moist. At first I bought all of those cute liners and I had random problems. I have no desire to come up short on an order and the Reynolds are my insurance policy. They cost more, so adjust your price.

playingwithsugar Posted 29 Nov 2010 , 11:21am
post #5 of 34

Are you taking them out of the baking pan right away, or do you leave them in there for a while?

Leaving them in the pan will steam the liner off the cupcake. Ever since I started taking them out of the pan immediately after baking, I no longer have that problem.

Theresa icon_smile.gif

cakeythings1961 Posted 29 Nov 2010 , 1:30pm
post #6 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by playingwithsugar

Are you taking them out of the baking pan right away, or do you leave them in there for a while?

Leaving them in the pan will steam the liner off the cupcake. Ever since I started taking them out of the pan immediately after baking, I no longer have that problem.

Theresa icon_smile.gif




This is what I do, also.

OP, are you using the Wilton liners? They're the only ones that have ever given me a problem. Reynold's are great. I have a few others labeled "grease prooof" that are also very dependable.

playingwithsugar Posted 29 Nov 2010 , 1:42pm
post #7 of 34

No, although I think some of the liners they offer now are really cool, I just can't justify the added expense.

I always go generic white, and use liners I buy at the restaurant supply store. If I need color, I just take some scrapbook paper and make a sleeve to go around it. I've already made sleeves with glossy paper and a rubber stamp, then cut them to size.

Theresa icon_smile.gif

elliegails Posted 30 Nov 2010 , 1:34pm
post #8 of 34

Thanks for the tips....Reynolds and taking out of pan immediately. Hoping both will come in handy in the future!

FlourPots Posted 2 Dec 2010 , 11:48am
post #9 of 34

Here's an interesting blog post about this topic: http://jessicakesblog.blogspot.com/2010/11/cupcake-wrapper-mystery-solved.html

mclaren Posted 2 Dec 2010 , 12:39pm
post #10 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by playingwithsugar

Are you taking them out of the baking pan right away, or do you leave them in there for a while?

Leaving them in the pan will steam the liner off the cupcake. Ever since I started taking them out of the pan immediately after baking, I no longer have that problem.

Theresa icon_smile.gif




This must be the reason I've never gotten any peeling liners all my cupcake life. I never knew this would save my life, though.

I normally take them out of the pan immediately because I have only one petitin and need to work fast to bake the whole batch of cupcakes, hence I take them out & put on wire racks as soon as they come out from the oven.

No wonder I never had any liners peeling problem before.

lovinlifekyles Posted 3 Dec 2010 , 3:54am
post #11 of 34

Its your recipe!!! This happened to me when I tried a new cupcake recipe out and it did the same thing... It was an order for some friends so I had to start the whole thing over with my normal fail safe recipe... They were fine... tried the other recipe again... fail.. cupcake liners looked horrible... went back to my standard recipe - no problems!! I think sometimes its the recipe... and i dont know what it is about it yet... maybe too much egg? or butter?

My advice? try a different cupcake recipe!! Good luck! thumbs_up.gif

scp1127 Posted 3 Dec 2010 , 9:23am
post #12 of 34

I agree it's the recipe, but my recipes are dense and moist and that seems to be what some liners don't like. If you like your recipe, use Reynolds or someone else's no fail liners. I do take mine out immediately too, but as they cooled, the cheap liners still pulled away. I did experiments with as many as 12 different liners in the same pan. Wilton, Celebrate, and cheap either peeled (only a few here and there), but I don't like the way they discolor either. Reynolds came through 100% of the time. I recently ordered brown foil greaseproof from etsy and so far, no peeling. If you are selling 24 cupcakes in an order and one peels, you have 23. I up my price to include the more costly liners, but I don't have to rebake... ever. And the price increase is rather insignificant in comparasion to the peace of mind.

Evoir Posted 4 Dec 2010 , 10:11am
post #13 of 34

I agree that the more fat in a recipe, or moisture, the increased likelihood of peeling.

I have tried adding a tsp of meringue powder to my cupcake recipe (very moist) and it seems to help, but its not conclusive yet!

Ellie1985 Posted 6 Dec 2010 , 11:20pm
post #14 of 34

I made some cupcakes this past weekend with Wilton cupcake liners for the first time. I was very disappointed with them. In the past I have always used the foil with the paper liners. But I wanted something nice for a Christmas party and bought cute Wilton Christmas ones. First off you couldn't see the design anymore after baking and when they cooled the liners peeled away. Guess I will try some Reynolds liners. I have seen them at my Krogers store but there are only a couple to pick from. Is there somewhere online that has a good selection?

scp1127 Posted 7 Dec 2010 , 1:21am
post #15 of 34

Reynolds has about six different foil colors and their new heavy printed paper liners work just as well. If you go to different grocery stores, and check every time you shop, the different patterns will be in stock. They are all available online too.

Evoir Posted 10 Jan 2011 , 5:54am
post #16 of 34

All I know is that the packet/box mixes never, EVER stick - in fact its like they are glued in! So whats the difference? Looking at the ingredients, I can see all the ones I have on hand (not many as I am a scratch baker and have bought these to study the peeling problem in depth) contain SOME form of vegetable gum.

So I am continuing with my experiments and will post my finding when I have a repeatable result!

simplysouthern Posted 10 Jan 2011 , 3:14pm
post #17 of 34

So odd, I've never had thus happen and I use tons of different recipes and liners. Heck I've even used liners I bought at the Dollar Store and no problems. My hummingbird recipe makes an incredibly moist cupcake and still no peeling. So is have to disagree that its the recipe. I too remove my cuppies from the pan immediately after taking them from oven. I place them on cooling racks and let then sit until totally cool before touching them.

elliespartycake Posted 10 Jan 2011 , 3:21pm
post #18 of 34

I have randomly had peeling problems with my cupcakes, so a couple of months ago I switched to the foil lined Reynolds liners from the supermarket. Problems gone, regardless of recipe. I'm a convert!

DaPom Posted 10 Jan 2011 , 3:56pm
post #19 of 34

I've had problems with the Wilton liners as well. No matter what recipe or boxed mix I used, they peeled off. Now I use them for nuts, cookies, chocolates, etc. (I thought I got a great deal on a bulk purchase).

I'll look for the Reynold's liners online and keep the cutsy Wilton ones for my other goodies.

Thanks for the info! icon_biggrin.gif

cheriej Posted 10 Jan 2011 , 9:06pm
post #20 of 34

It's possible it could also be the temp of your kitchen - if it's too hot then that could cause the liners to peel away. I also remove my cupcakes right away but I've found with a quality cupcake liner you can still leave them in the pan and they won't peel away . I use Cupcake Creations liners and have never had a problem.

ILoveDaffodils Posted 10 Jan 2011 , 10:52pm
post #21 of 34

So far I think it is recipe related. I have a sleeve of the same liners that I use on different types of cupcakes. I have tried taking them out of the pan right naway and leaving them in.
Chocolate recipe that uses oil - no butter - never peels away. Carrot cake, although very moist, never peels - also uses oil. Butter recipes always seem to always have some peeling. It seems to help if they are slightly overfilled and baked a short-time longer. I am going to try the same test with tyhe Reynolds liners.
It is making me crazy icon_confused.gif

FromScratchSF Posted 11 Jan 2011 , 3:56am
post #22 of 34

OK, so this is the 1st time I've done this (pimped a blog post) but, I had the same problem and actually solved it 100% of the time - check out my blog post to read about it. It's your baking powder...

http://fromscratchsf.wordpress.com/?s=kapow

LindaF144a Posted 11 Jan 2011 , 5:26am
post #23 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by FromScratchSF

OK, so this is the 1st time I've done this (pimped a blog post) but, I had the same problem and actually solved it 100% of the time - check out my blog post to read about it. It's your baking powder...

http://fromscratchsf.wordpress.com/?s=kapow




I need to get The Cake Bible out of the library. My memory is foggy on this. I thought she said the opposite of what you say. I am remembering the chart in the back chapters for different size cake pans. I will have to take it out of the library again and double check this.

Lot's of recipes are over leavened. But sometimes if you try to reduce it, you will be surprised at the results. It could work well for vanilla, but with chocolate (depending on which type of chocolate you use)you could end up with one dry, tough cupcake. I know I did when I tried my own personal experience. I tried adjusting the leavened a thousands way and the results were terrible. I ended up leaving it as is. Which by everything I read, the particular recipe was over leavened, but it was the tastiest, chocolatey, moist cake.

Although you are on to something with the leavener. I used to have a paper peeling problem. I have not lately because I felt it happened when cupcakes were under baked. I have switched brands and use a slightly larger size liner than what is sold in the stores. The one I use are 2 3/4 across the bottom and not 2". I also adjusted the leavener in my red velvet (the one I had the most problem with), but I ended up adding more leavener and not less. Again I have chocolate and vinegar and buttermilk that needs to have all that acid neutralized, so a RV is different than a vanilla.

While I have no peeling problems, I do get the spillover that you show on your blog. And I got it on my last batch of vanilla too. I think I need to make another batch and try your idea and see how it works for my vanilla cupcake. This may be answer to getting a pretty cupcake. I just hope it doesn't affect the moisture content.

FromScratchSF Posted 11 Jan 2011 , 5:54pm
post #24 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by LindaF144a

Quote:
Originally Posted by FromScratchSF

OK, so this is the 1st time I've done this (pimped a blog post) but, I had the same problem and actually solved it 100% of the time - check out my blog post to read about it. It's your baking powder...

http://fromscratchsf.wordpress.com/?s=kapow



I need to get The Cake Bible out of the library. My memory is foggy on this. I thought she said the opposite of what you say. I am remembering the chart in the back chapters for different size cake pans. I will have to take it out of the library again and double check this.

Lot's of recipes are over leavened. But sometimes if you try to reduce it, you will be surprised at the results. It could work well for vanilla, but with chocolate (depending on which type of chocolate you use)you could end up with one dry, tough cupcake. I know I did when I tried my own personal experience. I tried adjusting the leavened a thousands way and the results were terrible. I ended up leaving it as is. Which by everything I read, the particular recipe was over leavened, but it was the tastiest, chocolatey, moist cake.

Although you are on to something with the leavener. I used to have a paper peeling problem. I have not lately because I felt it happened when cupcakes were under baked. I have switched brands and use a slightly larger size liner than what is sold in the stores. The one I use are 2 3/4 across the bottom and not 2". I also adjusted the leavener in my red velvet (the one I had the most problem with), but I ended up adding more leavener and not less. Again I have chocolate and vinegar and buttermilk that needs to have all that acid neutralized, so a RV is different than a vanilla.

While I have no peeling problems, I do get the spillover that you show on your blog. And I got it on my last batch of vanilla too. I think I need to make another batch and try your idea and see how it works for my vanilla cupcake. This may be answer to getting a pretty cupcake. I just hope it doesn't affect the moisture content.




You are right, in the cake bible she does say the exact opposite! But I swear it works in both my vanilla and chocolate recipes. I also add (which I started doing after writing my blog post) an 1/8 tsp. of baking powder to every 12 cupcakes - I got this idea from Heavenly Cakes which I just got a month ago... the same recipes (her white cake and her chocolate butter cake) Rose updated in the new book lowering the baking powder and adding a bit of baking soda when making cupcakes. Now I get even better results.

ILoveDaffodils Posted 11 Jan 2011 , 10:45pm
post #25 of 34

FromScratchSF - may I ask a followup question? I read your blog and am excited because white cupcakes are my favorite and the one you show looks perfect.
So my question, the blog says to lower the baking powder by 1/3 so if the recipe calls for 1 tsp. , you would only use 2/3 tsp - is that correct?
I got confused because your CC comment says you add 1/8 tsp for every 12 cupcakes.
So does that mean you decrease by 1/3 but then add back 1/8 tsp per every 12 cupcakes?
Sorry to be so dense but I really want to try your idea.
Thanks, D

FromScratchSF Posted 11 Jan 2011 , 11:09pm
post #26 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by dah12345

FromScratchSF - may I ask a followup question? I read your blog and am excited because white cupcakes are my favorite and the one you show looks perfect.
So my question, the blog says to lower the baking powder by 1/3 so if the recipe calls for 1 tsp. , you would only use 2/3 tsp - is that correct?
I got confused because your CC comment says you add 1/8 tsp for every 12 cupcakes.
So does that mean you decrease by 1/3 but then add back 1/8 tsp per every 12 cupcakes?
Sorry to be so dense but I really want to try your idea.
Thanks, D




That's OK! It's hard for me to translate because I have my recipe broken down by weight and by the size I sell, which is larger then what you'd probably bake at home (I get 8 cupcakes vs. 12 so I think in 8's). I am assuming you are using a cake recipe, if you make a full batch, it will make an 8" cake or 24 cupcakes, right? So if it calls for 3 1/2 tsp baking powder, I'd try 3 tsp. and 1/4 tsp baking soda. If papers don't pull away but they rise too much, do 3 tsp. baking powder 1/8 tsp baking soda. If papers still pull away try 2 2/3 baking powder, 1/4 baking soda. You'll have to trial and error with it, but basically once you fix the paper problem, you fix the rising problem with soda. Make sense? Or if you want, PM me your original recipe and I'll take a look at what I'd tweak if I was you.

LindaF144a Posted 12 Jan 2011 , 9:42pm
post #27 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by FromScratchSF

Quote:
Originally Posted by LindaF144a

Quote:
Originally Posted by FromScratchSF

OK, so this is the 1st time I've done this (pimped a blog post) but, I had the same problem and actually solved it 100% of the time - check out my blog post to read about it. It's your baking powder...

http://fromscratchsf.wordpress.com/?s=kapow



I need to get The Cake Bible out of the library. My memory is foggy on this. I thought she said the opposite of what you say. I am remembering the chart in the back chapters for different size cake pans. I will have to take it out of the library again and double check this.

Lot's of recipes are over leavened. But sometimes if you try to reduce it, you will be surprised at the results. It could work well for vanilla, but with chocolate (depending on which type of chocolate you use)you could end up with one dry, tough cupcake. I know I did when I tried my own personal experience. I tried adjusting the leavened a thousands way and the results were terrible. I ended up leaving it as is. Which by everything I read, the particular recipe was over leavened, but it was the tastiest, chocolatey, moist cake.

Although you are on to something with the leavener. I used to have a paper peeling problem. I have not lately because I felt it happened when cupcakes were under baked. I have switched brands and use a slightly larger size liner than what is sold in the stores. The one I use are 2 3/4 across the bottom and not 2". I also adjusted the leavener in my red velvet (the one I had the most problem with), but I ended up adding more leavener and not less. Again I have chocolate and vinegar and buttermilk that needs to have all that acid neutralized, so a RV is different than a vanilla.

While I have no peeling problems, I do get the spillover that you show on your blog. And I got it on my last batch of vanilla too. I think I need to make another batch and try your idea and see how it works for my vanilla cupcake. This may be answer to getting a pretty cupcake. I just hope it doesn't affect the moisture content.



You are right, in the cake bible she does say the exact opposite! But I swear it works in both my vanilla and chocolate recipes. I also add (which I started doing after writing my blog post) an 1/8 tsp. of baking powder to every 12 cupcakes - I got this idea from Heavenly Cakes which I just got a month ago... the same recipes (her white cake and her chocolate butter cake) Rose updated in the new book lowering the baking powder and adding a bit of baking soda when making cupcakes. Now I get even better results.




This is interesting as her book and Shirley Corriher both say that you only need soda when working with an acidic batter. I have always used or altered a vanilla recipe based on this information. I'll make some vanilla cupcakes next week and incorporate this into my recipe. I'll let you know how it worked for me.

rere0726 Posted 14 Jan 2011 , 1:18am
post #28 of 34

I am a new baker and I have this same problem. Thanks for the tip.

Therese

Chef_Stef Posted 16 Jan 2011 , 4:06am
post #29 of 34

Hard to agree with the 'take them right out of the pan' theory.

I just did 800 mini cupcakes, 3 diff recipes, using probably Wilton mini liners for all, and probably more than half of those little f@$^ things were half unpeeled by the following morning, before I needed them for the BRIDAL FESTIVAL.

I thought it was BECAUSE I dumped them out of the pans so fast, that maybe the papers separated, because I've had this happen rarely if ever before.

I could have cried, so much time, and they looked embarrassing!!! I took some out and actually put them in new liners, but what a pain, what a waste, and how annoying!!

I was going to try leaving them IN the pan longer next time, but now I wonder if it's just the paper.

My larger cc's don't have that happen as much but I think they are Reynold's liners...

scp1127 Posted 16 Jan 2011 , 10:15am
post #30 of 34

fromscratchSF, I just read your blog and it is very interesting. When my cupcakes would pull away, it was not very often and only a tiny bit (1/4" on the top). I attributed it to my recipes being very moist and they are scratch. When my girls were little, I let them make box mixes. It never happened. Do you think there is just so much moisture a thin liner can handle? Or do you think less leavener would help? The color of the liner also doesn't hold up in my recipes. But I have also read Rose and Shirley. I just wasn't willing to change my recipes. I am interested in your opinion because some of the liners are so pretty (and could be used with light colored batters). Thankfully, Reynolds has a great variety now.

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%