Fondant Was So Hard Bride Could Not Cut The Cake?

Decorating By CakeDiva101 Updated 16 Nov 2010 , 11:18pm by Navyempress

CakeDiva101 Posted 16 Nov 2010 , 12:44am
post #1 of 25

Ok, so, today one of my clients (not a cake client) ask me if I had seen on one of those judge type of TV shows ( like judge Judy but some other one) that this bride was suing the baker that made her wedding cake because the fondant covering the cake was so hard she could not cut it icon_eek.gif! I have never heard of this but I was wondering if any of you have. I'm not an expert on fondant by all means but I have fondant covered cakes sitting out for several days and they were just fine. So, is this possible? What could have happened?

I appreciate any info on this icon_smile.gif

24 replies
cownsj Posted 16 Nov 2010 , 12:59am
post #2 of 25

I never heard of it either. I wonder if they used gumpaste or pastillage instead? Of maybe it was a dummy cake and they forgot? lol I have no idea.

MacsMom Posted 16 Nov 2010 , 12:59am
post #3 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by CakeDiva101

Ok, so, today one of my clients (not a cake client) ask me if I had seen on one of those judge type of TV shows ( like judge Judy but some other one) that this bride was suing the baker that made her wedding cake because the fondant covering the cake was so hard she could not cut it icon_eek.gif! I have never heard of this but I was wondering if any of you have. I'm not an expert on fondant by all means but I have fondant covered cakes sitting out for several days and they were just fine. So, is this possible? What could have happened?

I appreciate any info on this icon_smile.gif




Satin Ice can get quite hard, but it's still sliceable. I wonder if it was a chocolate fondant with too much chocolate and colder than room temp?

DSmo Posted 16 Nov 2010 , 1:01am
post #4 of 25

I agree with you. I've never seen fondant get that hard. Maybe the baker used gum paste instead of fondant.

The_Sugar_Fairy Posted 16 Nov 2010 , 1:02am
post #5 of 25

I do know that if someone tries cutting a fondant covered cake with a bread knife or a serated knife, it will just smoosh the cake and not make a clean cut. I'm not sure of the proper name of the knife.. but a sharp, non-serated knife has to be used. If for some reason, someone used royal icing under fondant, maybe that would make it too hard to cut though.

CakeDiva101 Posted 16 Nov 2010 , 1:09am
post #6 of 25

I did search the web but all I found was a couple last September who sod the baker because they got a plastic/fake cake instead of the real one. I will keep looking thumbs_up.gif

CakesByJen2 Posted 16 Nov 2010 , 1:11am
post #7 of 25

It doesn't get hard, but can be kinda tough, and if the cake is really soft and the knife isn't really sharp, it will be a smooshed mess! If they tried using the decorative cake knife & server, it would be a disaster!

trishvanhoozer Posted 16 Nov 2010 , 1:42am
post #8 of 25

I use Satin Ice and it gets super hard. In fact, I am going to start using another brand because of it. My last cake was so hard it was very difficult to cut (Thank goodness it was for family and I was the one cutting it!). Not sure what to switch to, but I am definately going to make the switch.

MacsMom Posted 16 Nov 2010 , 1:56am
post #9 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by trishvanhoozer

I use and it gets super hard. In fact, I am going to start using another brand because of it. My last cake was so hard it was very difficult to cut (Thank goodness it was for family and I was the one cutting it!). Not sure what to switch to, but I am definately going to make the switch.




Try Fondx or Fondarific. I use MMF now because it is very inexpensive and easy to make; I can make small or large batches, color and flavor it easily without having to knead (stir it into the melted mm's).

indydebi Posted 16 Nov 2010 , 11:00am
post #10 of 25

I agree with the knife thing. When I made my 50th birthday cake, I was having a TERRIBLE time cutting it. My impression was "the fondant is too hard". It wasn't rock-solid hard but it was hard to cut. A quick "HELP!" thread on CC and I learned I used the wrong knife. cutting the leftover fondant covered cake with a straight-edge knife ... oh man WHAT a difference! Like slicing warm butter!! and the piece of cake looked beautiful, too!

emccle Posted 16 Nov 2010 , 12:04pm
post #11 of 25


luddroth Posted 16 Nov 2010 , 12:25pm
post #12 of 25

Well that's just ridiculous! Even gumpaste on a styro dummy should give with the efforts they were using. I can't imagine what that was.

DavidDJr Posted 16 Nov 2010 , 1:04pm
post #13 of 25

The show was Swift Justice with Nancy Grace. And if I remember correctly, the lady actually bought some of the wedding cake with her to the little trial thing too.

DebBTX Posted 16 Nov 2010 , 1:45pm
post #14 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

I agree with the knife thing. When I made my 50th birthday cake, I was having a TERRIBLE time cutting it. My impression was "the fondant is too hard". It wasn't rock-solid hard but it was hard to cut. A quick "HELP!" thread on CC and I learned I used the wrong knife. cutting the leftover fondant covered cake with a straight-edge knife ... oh man WHAT a difference! Like slicing warm butter!! and the piece of cake looked beautiful, too!




Hey Indydebi,
Do you have a photo of your favorite fondant knife? It might save someone fondant cutting heartache.

Debbie B.

all4cake Posted 16 Nov 2010 , 1:53pm
post #15 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by emccle





That's the one I remember. From looking at the pillar type that was used, I would say they were trying to cut into a cake plate...a plate the same size as the surface of the bottom tier...possibly for an uninterrupted look...that would be my guess anyway.

LisaPeps Posted 16 Nov 2010 , 2:09pm
post #16 of 25

It would seem that they are British from the accent. And by the aged look of the building/clothes etc, I would say it is an old fashioned cake. Therefore I would say it is fruitcake covered in either sugarpaste or royal icing. Iced fruitcakes can be left out for a long time so I'd say it is a combination of those factors.

Davwattie Posted 16 Nov 2010 , 2:40pm
post #17 of 25

I agree with LisaPeps.

First thing that came to my mind was it looks like a wedding from about 20yrs+ ago and alot of the cakes were decorated in Royal Icing

I personally hated those cakes and dont know how anyone could eat them without breaking a few teeth!

Royal icing on sugar cookies thumbs_up.gif , on cakes thumbsdown.gif

cownsj Posted 16 Nov 2010 , 3:12pm
post #18 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by emccle





Based on that video, I would have to guess that the cake was frozen solid. Even after getting through the icing he was still sawing on the cake itself.

cakesdivine Posted 16 Nov 2010 , 4:52pm
post #19 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by trishvanhoozer

I use and it gets super hard. In fact, I am going to start using another brand because of it. My last cake was so hard it was very difficult to cut (Thank goodness it was for family and I was the one cutting it!). Not sure what to switch to, but I am definately going to make the switch.




Fondarific! It is amazing fondant and tastes amazing too! Love the buttercream flavor!

cakesdivine Posted 16 Nov 2010 , 5:01pm
post #20 of 25

What date on Swift justice did this happen? Can't seem to find it on their website of past cases.

jillyscakes Posted 16 Nov 2010 , 5:15pm
post #21 of 25

Got to be royal icing still popular with people over here in uk I still get asked for the hard icing icon_smile.gif

Bonnie151 Posted 16 Nov 2010 , 10:07pm
post #22 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Davwattie

I agree with LisaPeps.

First thing that came to my mind was it looks like a wedding from about 20yrs+ ago and alot of the cakes were decorated in Royal Icing

I personally hated those cakes and dont know how anyone could eat them without breaking a few teeth!

Royal icing on sugar cookies thumbs_up.gif , on cakes thumbsdown.gif




Yeah, ditto. The cake in the video is covered with royal icing which can get hard as a brick.

CakeDiva101 Posted 16 Nov 2010 , 10:30pm
post #23 of 25

The cake on YouTube it is not the cake in question. This case appeared on a very recent episode of Swift Justice with Nancy Grace. I still can't find it. I will keep looking . thumbs_up.gif

metria Posted 16 Nov 2010 , 10:43pm
post #24 of 25

here's my similar story, but was just funny mistake.

my hubby and i had been married a year and we pulled out the top tier of our wedding cake from the freezer to eat on our anniversary. we let it thaw to room temp. i went to cut the cake and the knife stuck right away. i thought jeez, how can this thing still be frozen? it was covered in plain buttercream. i braced myself and pushed hard. it was a sharp, thin knife and shouldn't have had a problem. turns out i put the knife right on top of the wooden dowel in the center of the cake. i sliced clean through the dowel! cake was just fine, tasted great.

Navyempress Posted 16 Nov 2010 , 11:18pm
post #25 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by all4cake

Quote:
Originally Posted by emccle





That's the one I remember. From looking at the pillar type that was used, I would say they were trying to cut into a cake plate...a plate the same size as the surface of the bottom tier...possibly for an uninterrupted look...that would be my guess anyway.




That was my first thought as well. Those are not push-in pillars so they have to be sitting on something.

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