Another Bad Cake Story In The News

Decorating By Kellbella Updated 17 Nov 2010 , 9:26pm by NanaSandy

23 replies
online_annie Posted 15 Nov 2010 , 2:47pm
post #2 of 24

I don't like that the reporter states you should always be leery of someone that bakes out of their home. It's another case of one bad apple that spoils the bunch. Buyer Beware. She had a tasting but did she review the Bakers work prior to booking? Based on what was delivered, and that the Baker was very proud of what she provided lends me to believe this is her standard of work. That would have been obvious throughout her website and portfolio unless of course she, like many others were showing photos of other people's work.
Thanks for shaing the link.

emilykakes Posted 15 Nov 2010 , 3:20pm
post #3 of 24

I would love to hear the back story on the replacement cake. It's amazing to me that the groomsmen were able to find a cake that nice at the last minute. I would also like to know what they were charged for the emergency cake.

Loucinda Posted 15 Nov 2010 , 3:26pm
post #4 of 24

I find things like that so irritating. Did that bride check out the baker??? Check references, check her previous work?? No, she thought she was getting a deal for $250. And the knock about the home bakers gets me too. I have a home based business. I spent a lot of money making that a possibility. I am licensed and registered with the state, have an LLC - things that are all VERY easy to verify. It as much that brides fault as it was the bakers, IMO.

cakeandpartygirl Posted 15 Nov 2010 , 5:58pm
post #5 of 24

Somebody needs to write a rebuttal to the news!! It was poorly written. Not all home bakers are inept at delivering what someone ordered!!!

Ladiesofthehouse Posted 15 Nov 2010 , 7:08pm
post #6 of 24

I think we will see this more and more. With all of the "fun" cake tools available in every hobby store, the cake cricut being hawked on HSN and all the reality cake shows out there it is easy for people to think that ANYONE can make a fancy cake!

Oh, and then they can just advertise for free on Crag's List and they are in business!

Along comes a bride looking for a bargain and if she browses through their portfolio of pictures taken from the internet, she could be easily fooled into thinking she will be getting a cake of that caliber.

I personally have seen more than one post right here on Cake Central where the no-experience cake maker has an irate bride that wants a refund. The baker posts a picture and then says that they just can't figure out why she didn't like her Leaning Tower of Pisa cake with the melting buttercream and lumpy fondant balls???

PieceofCakeAZ Posted 15 Nov 2010 , 7:10pm
post #7 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by online_annie

I don't like that the reporter states you should always be leery of someone that bakes out of their home. It's another case of one bad apple that spoils the bunch. Buyer Beware. She had a tasting but did she review the Bakers work prior to booking? Based on what was delivered, and that the Baker was very proud of what she provided lends me to believe this is her standard of work. That would have been obvious throughout her website and portfolio unless of course she, like many others were showing photos of other people's work.
Thanks for shaing the link.




Technically since that cake was done by company in Phoenix, where home bakeries aren't allowed, they were correct about being leery. But in general, you are correct there are thousands of amazing licensed home bakers in this country.

indydebi Posted 15 Nov 2010 , 8:20pm
post #8 of 24

yet in the same breath, the wedding media will advise brides to look for someone who does caking "on the side" because it will be cheaper.

They just cant' decide which side they're on, can they? icon_confused.gif

indydebi Posted 15 Nov 2010 , 8:24pm
post #9 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ladiesofthehouse

I think we will see this more and more. With all of the "fun" cake tools available in every hobby store, the cake being hawked on HSN and all the reality cake shows out there it is easy for people to think that ANYONE can make a fancy cake!


Again I'll share my favorite quote that I heard Kerry Vincent say at the Retail Bakers Assoc convention in Las Vegas:

"We must preserve the art of buttercream. There are too many people who think they can shove some material in a mold, put it on a cake and that makes them a cake decorator."

Now before anyone gets all up in arms (as they have before when I've shared this), I do not believe she was making an anti-fondant statement. I believe she was emphasizing there is a skill to caking and it's much more than "mold something and slap it on a cake"....BOOM! I'm a cake decorator!!

LoveMeSomeCake615 Posted 15 Nov 2010 , 8:48pm
post #10 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ladiesofthehouse

I think we will see this more and more. With all of the "fun" cake tools available in every hobby store, the cake being hawked on HSN and all the reality cake shows out there it is easy for people to think that ANYONE can make a fancy cake!

Again I'll share my favorite quote that I heard Kerry Vincent say at the Retail Bakers Assoc convention in Las Vegas:

"We must preserve the art of buttercream. There are too many people who think they can shove some material in a mold, put it on a cake and that makes them a cake decorator."

Now before anyone gets all up in arms (as they have before when I've shared this), I do not believe she was making an anti-fondant statement. I believe she was emphasizing there is a skill to caking and it's much more than "mold something and slap it on a cake"....BOOM! I'm a cake decorator!!




Exactly! thumbs_up.gif That's why the Cake Cricut gets on my nerves!

playingwithsugar Posted 15 Nov 2010 , 8:51pm
post #11 of 24

There's no excuse for this - if you have the money for a website, you should have the $6.99 for a set of Wilton Scroll Presses, or whatever they're called.

What did she do - let her 5-year-old help? My grandmother's distorted, arthritic hands can make better scrolls than that.

Theresa icon_smile.gif

costumeczar Posted 15 Nov 2010 , 8:58pm
post #12 of 24

That was my blog post, and it made me mad to hear that comment...But it also made me mad to hear that the baker was proud of her cake. Although she couldn't have been too proud if her website is now down.

There's a very low bar to get into the wedding cake business in a lot of places, and the lack of professionalism of people who think "it's fun to make a cake, so why not do weddings" reflects badly on the rest of us who make an effort. I wanted to highlight this in the context of being professional, and I HOPE THAT LADY IS ON HERE AND READS THIS (and yes that was yelling) icon_rolleyes.gif Bad baker lady, if you are on here and do read this, go buy my book, you need it.

LNW Posted 15 Nov 2010 , 9:12pm
post #13 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ladiesofthehouse

I think we will see this more and more. With all of the "fun" cake tools available in every hobby store, the cake being hawked on HSN and all the reality cake shows out there it is easy for people to think that ANYONE can make a fancy cake!

Oh, and then they can just advertise for free on Crag's List and they are in business!

Along comes a bride looking for a bargain and if she browses through their portfolio of pictures taken from the internet, she could be easily fooled into thinking she will be getting a cake of that caliber.

I personally have seen more than one post right here on Cake Central where the no-experience cake maker has an irate bride that wants a refund. The baker posts a picture and then says that they just can't figure out why she didn't like her Leaning Tower of Pisa cake with the melting buttercream and lumpy fondant balls???




ITA thumbs_up.gif

I feel bad for the bride. That's awesome those boys were able to get a new cake so fast.

Kellbella Posted 15 Nov 2010 , 9:38pm
post #14 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by playingwithsugar

There's no excuse for this - if you have the money for a website, you should have the $6.99 for a set of Wilton Scroll Presses, or whatever they're called.

What did she do - let her 5-year-old help? My grandmother's distorted, arthritic hands can make better scrolls than that.

Theresa icon_smile.gif




Exactly! thumbs_up.gif

kelleym Posted 15 Nov 2010 , 9:56pm
post #15 of 24

Ok, the cake is sub-par. BUT... Judge Judy would never order a refund for this case. (and yes, JJ is my main source and arbiter of justice icon_biggrin.gif) A cake was ordered, a cake was delivered. It didn't collapse. Presumably, it was edible. It didn't have cockroaches or mouse droppings in it, that we know of. Come to think of it, I'd love to know if it was eaten. I bet it was.

The bride visited the woman, ate her cake, presumably looked at her web site, saw her previous work, and ordered the cake. This was not a $2,000 couture Elisa Straus or Colette Peters. It was a $250 cake. I'm not sure why she's on the news complaining. Buyer beware, and all that.

I'm not excusing the baker. The cake should have been level. But maybe it's just that I've seen too many actual cake wrecks; the cake that was delivered doesn't even look cake-wreck worthy (from the VERY quick photos they showed on that news story, my opinion might change if I had a chance to study it and pick it apart. icon_razz.gif ).

scp1127 Posted 15 Nov 2010 , 11:10pm
post #16 of 24

costumeczar, I just ordered your book yesterday. I have been a business owner all my life, but the bakery is still new to me. I always read your comments on CC and am looking forward to your book, based on many years of experience. I have a fully licensed commercial kitchen, but I chose not to offer wedding cakes after being on this site for the last year. I only do wedding cakes and theme cakes for family (free). I am actually pretty good at it, but lack long time experience, which I think is important for such a monumental event in someone's life. I have searched some wedding cake sites in my area and they are very simple Wilton style... some cakes are not even straight on the web sites! But unless I choose to do more in my spare time, or a bunch of my relatives get married, I'll leave wedding cakes to someone else.

costumeczar Posted 15 Nov 2010 , 11:46pm
post #17 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by kelleym

The bride visited the woman, ate her cake, presumably looked at her web site, saw her previous work, and ordered the cake. This was not a $2,000 couture Elisa Straus or Colette Peters. It was a $250 cake. I'm not sure why she's on the news complaining. Buyer beware, and all that.

I'm not excusing the baker. The cake should have been level. But maybe it's just that I've seen too many actual cake wrecks; the cake that was delivered doesn't even look cake-wreck worthy (from the VERY quick photos they showed on that news story, my opinion might change if I had a chance to study it and pick it apart. icon_razz.gif ).




I have to agree with you on that to a certain extent, but we don't know if the baker showed the bride photos of her actual work or someone else's. Of course we're only hearing half the story, but we saw the evidence, and it was bad.

What gets me worked up is two things. First, this woman shouldn't be selling wedding cakes YET. She needs to practice and get to the point that her cakes look right, and that one didn't. Not to say that she won't get better, but she shouldnt' be selling anything yet.

Second, that bad experience paints all home-based businesses with the same brush, which REALLY gets my goat! It's hard enough to get over some people's preconceived notions that if you don't have a storefront you're not "worthy" without having to be lumped in with inferior product by the news anchors.

@scp1127, if you've been in business that long I don't know how much my book will be of value to you, but I think it's probably got some backbone-building tools in there that most of us can use at one point or another.

-K8memphis Posted 16 Nov 2010 , 12:51am
post #18 of 24

I mean it was probably <$2 a serving give or take. Bride was looking for a bargain. Sure it could have been done better. But this baker was proud of her work so she was not super experienced--I think the bride got what she paid for.

And to me the kicker is she got the ever loving tasting!
Tastings are not indicative of expertise at tier cake.
References are like the newslady said.

And the newslady says that working from home is not a bad thing before she says be leery of it. That's sound advice. The laws are so roller coaster across the country. Folks with nice studios & stuff at home can still be proud and viable and professional.

They can also make amateurish cakes just like a free standing bakery.

sweetonyouzz Posted 17 Nov 2010 , 7:27pm
post #19 of 24

This was supposed to be a professional cake. The baker had a website and came across like she knew what she was doing. Regardless of the price, if you are putting yourself out there as a pro you should be able to back it up with a presentable cake. I think the cake was terrible and I do not blame them for complaining. A bad apple is not good for the rest of us who work hard to keep a good reputation for our business

sweetonyouzz Posted 17 Nov 2010 , 7:32pm
post #20 of 24

Also, Indydebi, in regards to your comments about buttercream I agree 1000 percent!!!! This to me is your a b c's of cake decoration.

Coral3 Posted 17 Nov 2010 , 8:48pm
post #21 of 24

The bride says "the price was really nice"...perhaps it's a case of she got what she paid for! Decorators on here often complain about people who expect a masterpiece on a beer budget - this bride could be one of those people!

Loucinda Posted 17 Nov 2010 , 8:56pm
post #22 of 24
Quote:
Quote:

This was supposed to be a professional cake. The baker had a website and came across like she knew what she was doing. Regardless of the price, if you are putting yourself out there as a pro you should be able to back it up with a presentable cake.




I disagree. I have see PLENTY of folks who put up a website and *bing* they're all ready for business. I know of several right off the top of my head that make (and post the pics on their websites) what I consider sub-par work, but yet, folks see their work on the website, and STILL order from them. IMO, if you do that, you get what you paid for.

trishvanhoozer Posted 17 Nov 2010 , 9:20pm
post #23 of 24

I think that this bride should get her money back. She was duped, scammed. This baker is avoiding her. If she were honorable, she would face the music and do the right thing. If the bride is unhappy (and I would be with that cake delivered) she owes the bride a chance to let her know how she feels. If she has no refund policy, then shame on her. It just makes the home bakers look even worse. As far as I know, every home baker I have dealt with is 100 times more professional than this - usually with contracts, referances and refund policies. I show my brides not only a portfolio but also the camera card I took the photos with and if they ask for references I give them. I am proud of my work, and I have a very reasonable refund policy. This poor girl - and what did the groom's men have to pay for the replacement? It was done in 2 hours and was awesome - I feel bad for this bride and I am sick that the baker was so unprofesisonal and basically a con artist. To promise something at a low cost is not a license to do a terrible job. The wedding party was young and probably on a small budget. I try very hard to give exceptional quality within my bride's budget - no matter how low that budget it.

NanaSandy Posted 17 Nov 2010 , 9:26pm
post #24 of 24

where was this story? I haven't heard about it?

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%