I Did It! I Passed My Home Inspection!!!!

Business By ptanyer Updated 23 Nov 2010 , 12:17am by ptanyer

ptanyer Posted 10 Nov 2010 , 1:19am
post #1 of 32

The Health Inspector came today and my home passed inspection icon_biggrin.gif . I am filing my DBA tomorrow morning and filing for Fed and NC tax id #'s and the worst will be over with icon_cool.gif . I'm so glad to have gotten through all of the paperwork and the inspection.

It feel's great to be legal icon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gif

Just had to share icon_biggrin.gif
Pam

31 replies
adonisthegreek1 Posted 10 Nov 2010 , 1:29am
post #2 of 32

Congratulations!

ellentwn Posted 10 Nov 2010 , 1:33am
post #3 of 32

Awesome news, good luck and have fun!!!

EdieP Posted 10 Nov 2010 , 1:55am
post #4 of 32

What did the inspector check for? I am still waiting for them to contact me about scheduling a time to inspect my kitchen area. Could you clarify what a DBA is?

G_Cakes Posted 10 Nov 2010 , 2:00am
post #5 of 32

Congratualtions!

Scarlets-Cakes Posted 10 Nov 2010 , 2:00am
post #6 of 32

Congratulations! Can't wait until I can do the same.....

ptanyer Posted 10 Nov 2010 , 2:14am
post #7 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by EdieP

What did the inspector check for? I am still waiting for them to contact me about scheduling a time to inspect my kitchen area. Could you clarify what a DBA is?




The inspection took about an hour. She checked my bathroom - sink and toilet, checked for leaks around the toilet and under the sink. Checked for hot water and paper towels. In the kitchen she checked the sink (same as the bathroom), stove, oven and refrigerator/freezer. Checked all light bulbs - have to be covered, or if fluor. bulbs have to be shatterproof. Checked for separate shelves for storage in the refrigerator/freezer. Checked my baking area (spices, flavorings, salt, etc. Checked all my storage of supplies and equipment. Examined my mixing bowls, etc. Basically she had me take her on a tour of my house to see where and how all things connected to cake decorating in my home are stored. She used a flashlight and was very thorough. She was very nice and easy to talk to and very encouraging icon_smile.gif I have well water and I had to provide a copy of the report from having my water tested. I have to have the test done annually and I can email the report to her.

DBA is "Doing Business As". You have to complete a form and record it at the local Register of Deeds. The official name of the form is "CERTIFICATE OF ASSUMED NAME FOR A SOLE PROPRIETORSHIP, PARTNERHSIP, LIMITED PARTNERSHIP". This becomes public record and lets people know that you are doing business under a certain name. In my case it's my full name doing business as "Pamela's Cakes & Confections". I am a sole proprietorship.

Hope that helps icon_biggrin.gif
Pam

eperales0411 Posted 10 Nov 2010 , 2:24am
post #8 of 32

Congrats!!! thumbs_up.gif Wish you the best and hope you have lots of fun!!!

ptanyer Posted 10 Nov 2010 , 2:29am
post #9 of 32

Thanks for all the congrats icon_biggrin.gif I've been caking for about 3 years now and have had so much fun making cakes for family and friends. Now I can make cakes for anyone that wants one icon_lol.gificon_lol.gif

xxscarlet Posted 10 Nov 2010 , 2:33am
post #10 of 32

SO WHAT are the requirements did you need for your home expection?

cakesnglass Posted 10 Nov 2010 , 2:44am
post #11 of 32

I can't believe we are not allowed to do this in Florida, what's the difference?? Boo Hoo icon_sad.gif

ptanyer Posted 10 Nov 2010 , 2:46am
post #12 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by xxscarlet

SO WHAT are the requirements did you need for your home expection?




First of all, welcome to CC icon_biggrin.gif

I'm in NC and here's a link to the website that explains about the process. http://www.ncagr.gov/fooddrug/food/homebiz.htm. Also see my post above which describes the inspection itself. Being clean, clean, clean and organized is a must. She and I spoke about the inspection when she called to set the date and time, and was very willing to share information with me about the process. She wasn't out to discourage me, and was very supportive.

Hope that helps icon_smile.gif
Pam

ptanyer Posted 10 Nov 2010 , 2:47am
post #13 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakesnglass

I can't believe we are not allowed to do this in Florida, what's the difference?? Boo Hoo icon_sad.gif




I know, it's sad icon_sad.gif

cupadeecakes Posted 10 Nov 2010 , 11:49pm
post #14 of 32

It was such a process building my kitchen. I have 500 sq feet added onto my house so it's a little different, well a lot but I'm glad I could afford to do it that way. I have kitties and couldn't bare to get rid of them. I had to have a 1000 grease trap and extra field line added to my septic system. But that. Was six years ago. My inspector is coming on Monday and I am not even worried icon_biggrin.gif

JulieMN Posted 11 Nov 2010 , 12:49am
post #15 of 32

Congratulations--what an exciting time for you! thumbs_up.gifthumbs_up.gifthumbs_up.gif

VoiceOfReason Posted 11 Nov 2010 , 1:42am
post #16 of 32

I will start by saying that I am a health inspector in Florida. There are downsides to this idea. Currently Florida statute prohibits the regulation of home kitchens. This is designed to protect people from state intrusion. If you could get the majority of people who do not have cake businesses to endorse a change to allow inspection of home kitchens, most home kitchens are not built to commercial bakery standards. The equipment is not constructed to NSF standards. A home dishwasher does not sanitize, for instance. A home sink is not plumbed with an air gap. The real problem though is the intermingling of living quarters and a home kitchen that invariably happens. In a licensed kitchen; animals and sick employees are easily excluded. In a home kitchen operated by someone watching their sick children that are home from school, not so much. Then, there's inspections. In a licensed kitchen anything that is not part of the operation can be discarded. How many inspectors are going to thoroughly go through a home refrigerator examining the mystery leftovers and make people discard them. Allowing people to prepare commercial food from home will necessarily result in a lessening of protection for the public.

cake_architect Posted 11 Nov 2010 , 2:01am
post #17 of 32

congrats! thats so awesome for you =D

jammjenks Posted 11 Nov 2010 , 2:04am
post #18 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by ptanyer

Now I can make cakes for anyone that wants one icon_lol.gificon_lol.gif




Ooh, pick me - pick me. I want one!

Congrats Pam. So glad you're on your way. Hope you make $$$$. Heck, anybody seeing that cut-corner fondant wedding cake would know you have the skill it takes to do this!

orchid001982 Posted 11 Nov 2010 , 2:41am
post #19 of 32

Congratulations!!!

Thanks for all the info. I've been saving to remodel my kitchen and want to remodel so that I can get licensed too but in PA it's next to impossible to find out what the requirements are. I've contacted my local health department but haven't gotten a response icon_sad.gif Any suggestions from anyone in PA?

Sucrea Posted 11 Nov 2010 , 3:02am
post #20 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by VoiceOfReason

I will start by saying that I am a health inspector in Florida. There are downsides to this idea. Currently Florida statute prohibits the regulation of home kitchens. This is designed to protect people from state intrusion. If you could get the majority of people who do not have cake businesses to endorse a change to allow inspection of home kitchens, most home kitchens are not built to commercial bakery standards. The equipment is not constructed to NSF standards. A home dishwasher does not sanitize, for instance. A home sink is not plumbed with an air gap. The real problem though is the intermingling of living quarters and a home kitchen that invariably happens. In a licensed kitchen; animals and sick employees are easily excluded. In a home kitchen operated by someone watching their sick children that are home from school, not so much. Then, there's inspections. In a licensed kitchen anything that is not part of the operation can be discarded. How many inspectors are going to thoroughly go through a home refrigerator examining the mystery leftovers and make people discard them. Allowing people to prepare commercial food from home will necessarily result in a lessening of protection for the public.




I have to disagree with you. My DH is in HVAC and has been in many commercial kitchens/restaurants. He has commented on how dirty they are compared to our home. I myself have seen waiters cough and sneeze and not wash hands. I have seen a mexican food restaurant take tortilla chips from tables that were done and put the chips back in the container of chips. This would never happen in my own kitchen. I think that if people are willing to make the necessary changes to their homes in order to pass a health department inspection then why not let home kitchens exist. As long as they are up to code!

ptanyer - Congratulations on your home kitchen!! Good luck and have fun!!

sugarlovemom Posted 11 Nov 2010 , 4:07am
post #21 of 32

yayyyy!!! congratulations!!!! all the best for you Pam!!!! you are free to rock it now!!!! icon_biggrin.gif

ptanyer Posted 11 Nov 2010 , 4:37am
post #22 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by jammjenks

Quote:
Originally Posted by ptanyer

Now I can make cakes for anyone that wants one icon_lol.gificon_lol.gif



Ooh, pick me - pick me. I want one!

Congrats Pam. So glad you're on your way. Hope you make $$$$. Heck, anybody seeing that cut-corner fondant wedding cake would know you have the skill it takes to do this!




Thank you icon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gif (bowing, bowing).

Any to everyone else, thanks for the support and congrats icon_lol.gif I am very excited and look forward to a long future of caking. The best part of being able to bake from home is being able to control how much I want to do and take time off when I want to. I still work a full time day job and that factors into my workload as well.

But I do have one question, I want to post a phrase on my future website that explains I am inspected and approved by the NCDAG, but not sure how to word it. NC doesn't give you a "license" after they approve you. My county doesn't require a business license, my town doesn't require one and I don't live in the city. So there is no license to refer to. Yet I am legal to operate as a home baker. Any suggestions?

And to all the other posters that are working toward getting licensed, I can only say that it is 100% worth the time and effort that is needed to do it. I feel liberated. Now when someone admires my work, I can proudly say I am the owner of my own home business. I put it off as long as I could and finally I just sat down one night and prepared by business plan, comleted my paperwork and emailed it in the next morning. That was the hardest thing to do mentally. Then came the physical work. I cleaned and reorganized everthing to suit the requirements, I spent a little money to purchase things I had been wanting to help with the organization of my equipment and now everything is done and I feel much more efficient. So in the long run, all the time I have read and read, and watched shows, studied comments on CC, and just dreaming finally paid off icon_smile.gif

And to VoiceofReason, I'm sorry that you feel that way. You are entitled to your opinion, and there are those of us who disagree. I am very grateful that I live in a state that allows me this freedom of expression, and the opportunity to make extra money to help out with household expenses which are constantly on the rise, and never go down.

mandagail Posted 11 Nov 2010 , 5:25pm
post #23 of 32

Congrats to you!!! I'm still waitint to hear from the inspector on when he/she will be out to inspect my kitchen!

Happy Cake Baking icon_biggrin.gif

cakeandpartygirl Posted 11 Nov 2010 , 8:53pm
post #24 of 32

Ptayner,
Congrats!!!!

QTCakes1 Posted 11 Nov 2010 , 9:19pm
post #25 of 32

Congratulations!

EdieP Posted 19 Nov 2010 , 7:25pm
post #26 of 32

I have Cheri coming on the 14th of december

Annabakescakes Posted 20 Nov 2010 , 1:14am
post #27 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by VoiceOfReason

I will start by saying that I am a health inspector in Florida. There are downsides to this idea. Currently Florida statute prohibits the regulation of home kitchens. This is designed to protect people from state intrusion. If you could get the majority of people who do not have cake businesses to endorse a change to allow inspection of home kitchens, most home kitchens are not built to commercial bakery standards. The equipment is not constructed to NSF standards. A home dishwasher does not sanitize, for instance. A home sink is not plumbed with an air gap. The real problem though is the intermingling of living quarters and a home kitchen that invariably happens. In a licensed kitchen; animals and sick employees are easily excluded. In a home kitchen operated by someone watching their sick children that are home from school, not so much. Then, there's inspections. In a licensed kitchen anything that is not part of the operation can be discarded. How many inspectors are going to thoroughly go through a home refrigerator examining the mystery leftovers and make people discard them. Allowing people to prepare commercial food from home will necessarily result in a lessening of protection for the public.




I wish everybody could have their own commercial kitchen in their home if they wanted one, but I do realize we can't. I do think that they are vastly superior to regular kitchens, due to everything VoiceOfReason said plus commercial ovens to bake the whole wedding cake in an hour! And all the space and no cross contamination.

I have no wish to debate, I just want to say that I do agree with both sides of this! I want my own bakery and have taken steps to start one in my garage. It would be so much easier if I could do it in my own kitchen, but I cannot, and really, a lot of times I am horrified at the state of my kitchen! And the thought of pets in the home and caking makes me sick! GAG!!! Cakes are out and exposed for a long time during cooling, decorating and waiting to be picked up. I sat, more power to ya if your house is always clean!

Plus I do have a sick kid often, as I have 4 of them! Someone is bound to get sick! And I have mysteries in my fridge and clutter! I also cook chicken and hamburger and pork chops and I always get nervous about how clean everything is before i get started.

I do sell cakes, and yes it is illegal, and yes i try to clean, but man, I can't wait to be legal and stop trashing my kitchen!!

Evoir Posted 21 Nov 2010 , 1:14am
post #28 of 32

Congratulations ptanyer!

Annabakescakes Posted 21 Nov 2010 , 2:19am
post #29 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Annabakescakes

Quote:
Originally Posted by VoiceOfReason

I will start by saying that I am a health inspector in Florida. There are downsides to this idea. Currently Florida statute prohibits the regulation of home kitchens. This is designed to protect people from state intrusion. If you could get the majority of people who do not have cake businesses to endorse a change to allow inspection of home kitchens, most home kitchens are not built to commercial bakery standards. The equipment is not constructed to NSF standards. A home dishwasher does not sanitize, for instance. A home sink is not plumbed with an air gap. The real problem though is the intermingling of living quarters and a home kitchen that invariably happens. In a licensed kitchen; animals and sick employees are easily excluded. In a home kitchen operated by someone watching their sick children that are home from school, not so much. Then, there's inspections. In a licensed kitchen anything that is not part of the operation can be discarded. How many inspectors are going to thoroughly go through a home refrigerator examining the mystery leftovers and make people discard them. Allowing people to prepare commercial food from home will necessarily result in a lessening of protection for the public.



I wish everybody could have their own commercial kitchen in their home if they wanted one, but I do realize we can't. I do think that they are vastly superior to regular kitchens, due to everything VoiceOfReason said plus commercial ovens to bake the whole wedding cake in an hour! And all the space and no cross contamination.

I have no wish to debate, I just want to say that I do agree with both sides of this! I want my own bakery and have taken steps to start one in my garage. It would be so much easier if I could do it in my own kitchen , but I cannot, and really, a lot of times I am horrified at the state of my kitchen when i am done with a cake! And the thought of pets in the home and caking makes me sick! GAG!!! Cakes are out and exposed for a long time during cooling, decorating and waiting to be picked up. I sat, more power to ya if your house is always clean!

Plus I do have a sick kid every now and then, as I have 4 of them! Someone is bound to get sick! And I have mysteries in my fridge and clutter! I also cook chicken and hamburger and pork chops and I always get nervous about how clean everything is before i get started.

I do sell cakes, and yes it is illegal, and yes i try to clean, but man, I can't wait to be legal and stop trashing my kitchen!!


homebasedbaking Posted 22 Nov 2010 , 3:27am
post #30 of 32

Congrats Pam, I was a home-based baker in Cary, NC for years...gotta love those NC compliance folks! Good luck to you!!!

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%