Earlenes Cake Serving Chart Or Wiltons?

Decorating By Creativebakes Updated 10 Nov 2010 , 10:20pm by metria

Creativebakes Posted 9 Nov 2010 , 6:36pm
post #1 of 22

The discrepency between the two charts is huge!! Wiltons serving chart seems alittle stingy but earlenes seems like it yields much less. In your opinion which serving chart is more accurate? icon_confused.gif

21 replies
deeb173 Posted 9 Nov 2010 , 8:06pm
post #2 of 22

I like earlene's..I think it's more realistic

icer101 Posted 9 Nov 2010 , 8:25pm
post #3 of 22

i agree with indydebi about what she says about the wilton chart. Been using it for 15 yrs.

Kitagrl Posted 9 Nov 2010 , 8:26pm
post #4 of 22

I like Earlenes because it gives a little leeway...if people are used to Wilton's, then there will be plenty of cake...if they are not...then still, I'm sure that Earlene's chart will produce enough cake.

I do use the Wilton's party chart for sheet cakes.

Creativebakes Posted 9 Nov 2010 , 8:52pm
post #5 of 22

what does indydebi say about the wilton chart?

Creativebakes Posted 10 Nov 2010 , 2:23am
post #7 of 22

If a client asks you to make a cake for X amount of people, would you go with wilton's serving chart 1x2x4 even if it was for a birthday party? If you charge your clients by the serving, would you charge less for a birthday party cake seeing that the servings are bigger and charge more for a wedding cake?

3GCakes Posted 10 Nov 2010 , 2:39am
post #8 of 22

There has been some discussion on this recently....where some people on here decide what they want they want to charge "per cake"...and then give a range of servings.

So maybe an 8-inch cake serves 15 on Earlene's chart and 24 (I think) on Wilton's.

Go ahead and decide you will make an 8inch for $XX.XX amount of dollars. (Say...80.00).

That makes it approx. $5.33/slice (by Earlene's chart )or $3.33/slice (by Wilton).

The client is informed it serves 15-24 DEPENDING ON HOW IT IS CUT. Let them decide if they want to buy more cake or err on the higher side of servings. This is when you may want to discuss what else is being served at the event.

You are still selling the same amount of cake.

It was only the last few days that my foggy mind was able to comprehend this concept...and I really like it.

Creativebakes Posted 10 Nov 2010 , 3:01am
post #9 of 22

okay so a 10x10 square cake yields 40 servings on earlene's chart and 98 on wilton's. Thats a huge range.

3GCakes Posted 10 Nov 2010 , 3:07am
post #10 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Creativebakes

okay so a 10x10 square cake yields 40 servings on earlene's chart and 98 on wilton's. Thats a huge range.




I do not see on Wilton's chart where a 10x10 says it will serve 98...

both charts seem to say they serve 40.

3GCakes Posted 10 Nov 2010 , 3:14am
post #12 of 22

I am referring to Wilton's Wedding chart, and Earlene's chart from her website.

WHen looking at these charts, it is helpful to make note if they are talking about one or two layers. Two layers usually means a 4 inch high cake.

I only use WIlton's wedding chart. I make the comparison to Earlene's wedding chart.

Creativebakes Posted 10 Nov 2010 , 3:16am
post #13 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by 3GCakes

Quote:
Originally Posted by Creativebakes

okay so a 10x10 square cake yields 40 servings on earlene's chart and 98 on wilton's. Thats a huge range.



I do not see on Wilton's chart where a 10x10 says it will serve 98...

both charts seem to say they serve 40.




Sorry I was thinking about a 14x14 cake and I'm using the old wilton "Beautiful Bridal Cake" book. But now that i look on the wilton website the serving sizes are different icon_confused.gif

Texas_Rose Posted 10 Nov 2010 , 3:18am
post #14 of 22

I've used Earlene's chart in the past and it seemed to be about the right amount of cake. I only bake for friends and relatives though, so I don't have to worry about price per serving.

If you're running a business and pricing by serving, I think the industry standard is Wilton's chart. So if you're using Earlene's chart and have less servings per cake, then to make the same amount of profit as someone using Wilton's chart, you have to have a higher price per serving, which may cause you to lose some business if someone is just shopping around by price per serving.

Creativebakes Posted 10 Nov 2010 , 3:19am
post #15 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by 3GCakes

I am referring to Wilton's Wedding chart, and Earlene's chart from her website.

WHen looking at these charts, it is helpful to make note if they are talking about one or two layers. Two layers usually means a 4 inch high cake.

I only use WIlton's wedding chart. I make the comparison to Earlene's wedding chart.




What do you mean you make the comparison to Earlene's?

Motta Posted 10 Nov 2010 , 3:31am
post #16 of 22

The client is informed it serves 15-24 DEPENDING ON HOW IT IS CUT. Let them decide if they want to buy more cake or err on the higher side of servings. This is when you may want to discuss what else is being served at the event.

You are still selling the same amount of cake.

It was only the last few days that my foggy mind was able to comprehend this concept...and I really like it.[/quote]

Yes, this is what I'm doing now and I just go by the highest number in the range (eg. 15-24 so I go with 24) multiplied by what I want to charge per serving. So an 8 inch, 2 layer buttercream iced cake would be 24 x $3.00 per serving = $72. But I let the customer know it will serve 15-24 so they can cut it as they like.

kristanashley Posted 10 Nov 2010 , 3:40am
post #17 of 22

I use the wilton chart for all of my cakes. I've never had anyone complain that the pieces were too small.

3GCakes Posted 10 Nov 2010 , 1:34pm
post #18 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Creativebakes

Quote:
Originally Posted by 3GCakes

I am referring to Wilton's Wedding chart, and Earlene's chart from her website.

WHen looking at these charts, it is helpful to make note if they are talking about one or two layers. Two layers usually means a 4 inch high cake.

I only use WIlton's wedding chart. I make the comparison to Earlene's wedding chart.



What do you mean you make the comparison to Earlene's?




I mean I am comparing Wilton's servings to Earlene's when I give a range. The client chooses do they want to cut it into 15 pieces (Earlene) or 24 (Wilton).

TexasSugar Posted 10 Nov 2010 , 3:34pm
post #19 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Creativebakes



Do you use the same Wilton's serving chart for weddings and for birthdays?




Yes. One set of numbers to keep up with, besides two.

As Indy would say, you use the chart to base your price off of. A 6in can can feed 12 people or just 2 people, but the price is going to be based off how many people it is meant to serve. If someone wants bigger pieces they need to order more cake.

Also if you have two different serving charts then you have to have two different serving prices, because other wise you will get the question of if I order this cake for a wedding (more servings) why is it more than if I order this cake for a birthday (less servings).

vangiecakes Posted 10 Nov 2010 , 7:15pm
post #20 of 22

I use Earlenes all the time and is most realistic and however I dont like how she has done her fondant amounts.

Creativebakes Posted 10 Nov 2010 , 10:00pm
post #21 of 22

thanks everyone for all your help!!

metria Posted 10 Nov 2010 , 10:20pm
post #22 of 22

i know this is all confusing. Wilton has 4 different charts to look at. I made a quick online calculator with the Wilton chart data if you want to play with numbers:

http://shinymetalobjects.net/cake/calculator/cake_calculator.cgi

I just put up a new calculator that will determine your total number of servings based on your desired single serving dimensions (e.g. 1"x2"x4" slice):

http://shinymetalobjects.net/cake/calculator/cake_calculator_byVolume.cgi

I hope this helps someone icon_smile.gif

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