Ganache Or Sugar Syrup Under Fondant Make A Difference?

Decorating By Sweet_Toof Updated 5 Nov 2010 , 8:13am by Bluehue

Sweet_Toof Posted 3 Nov 2010 , 11:42pm
post #1 of 7

I wanted to cover a chocolate mud cake in fondant.
I've only done it once with ganache underneath. I suppose ganache isn't the cheapest of all ingredients to be adding just to get the fondant to stick to the cake
Besides taste, would there be a big different to brush sugar syrup onto the cake and then cover with fondant?
I wasn't sure if maybe it needs something thicker to give the fondant a smoother appearance?

6 replies
BlakesCakes Posted 4 Nov 2010 , 5:11am
post #2 of 7

Most people who are eating the cake will prefer something under the fondant other than sugar syrup.

They'd be looking for buttercream, ganache, or marzipan..................

Rae

Bluehue Posted 4 Nov 2010 , 5:32am
post #3 of 7

Altho the sugar syrup will adhere your fondant to your cake - as BC's says - you really do want something palettable under your Fondant.

Remembering that the sugar syrup might make the underneath side of you fondant a bit gooey (sticky) whereas allowing the ganach to set up and firm up - won't do this to your fondant,...IYKWIM
For me - what ever i tort my cakes with is what i use under my fondnt/regalice/medium.

Except Marzipan of course - but then that is mainly only used on Christmas Fruit Cakes over here.

Bluehue icon_smile.gif

Sweet_Toof Posted 4 Nov 2010 , 7:31am
post #4 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluehue

Altho the sugar syrup will adhere your fondant to your cake - as BC's says - you really do want something palettable under your Fondant.

Remembering that the sugar syrup might make the underneath side of you fondant a bit gooey (sticky) whereas allowing the ganach to set up and firm up - won't do this to your fondant,...IYKWIM
For me - what ever i tort my cakes with is what i use under my fondnt/regalice/medium.

Bluehue icon_smile.gif




Yeah, good point guys, thank you. I just always seem to make the cake that tiny bit un-level & I'd keep the costs down. But I think you're right, it'll be worth it in the end.
Btw, what does torte mean? Is that just where you would layer the cake with filling?


Also, how should I calculate how much I need? (Its for 3 tier square - 6,9, 12")

Bluehue Posted 4 Nov 2010 , 9:05am
post #5 of 7

There is this cake cutting guide from Earlens Cakes (just incase the link is blocked you can find it on Google) http://www.earlenescakes.com/ckserchart.htm

Or there is the Wilton one...i go by the Australian sizing - which is different to the USA.



OK - this is where everyone comes out and starts jumping down throats - or should i say - my throat................lolllllllll

Don't mind the capitals at the end of the post Sweet-Toof - its not for you - its for those who don't read the small print... icon_rolleyes.gificon_lol.gificon_wink.gif

I have said it before and i will say it again.
Tort and Torte are two different things.

What you say and do in the USA and what we do and say in Australia is very different.

If i go into a shop and ask for a Torte - i get a certain type and style of cake.

If i am about ready to Tort my cake it means to layer horizonitally
The cake i am working on at the moment i have torted into 6 layers.
Only the *e is added when speaking in past tense.

And just incase someone skipped over the above sentances - and whats to comment on my grammer.......
WE SPELL THINGS DIFFERENTLY HERE IN AUSTRALIA.
WE PRONOUNCE AND SPELL VERY DIFFERENTLY TO AMERICANS.
IT DOES NOT MEAN I AM WRONG - IT MEANS WE DO THINGS DIFFERENT.


Hope some of this helps you Sweet Toof.... icon_smile.gif

Bluehue

Sweet_Toof Posted 5 Nov 2010 , 7:33am
post #6 of 7

Damn Aussies! What would they know anyway!!! icon_smile.gif

Bluehue Posted 5 Nov 2010 , 8:13am
post #7 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sweet_Toof

Damn Aussies! What would they know anyway!!! icon_smile.gif





Nuffin lollllllllllllllllllllllllll

Bluehue

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