Fondant - Ever Feel Like Poking Your Own Eye Out????

Decorating By EvMarie Updated 4 Nov 2010 , 2:06am by EvMarie

EvMarie Posted 2 Nov 2010 , 12:52am
post #1 of 19

So - I'm a bit frustrated. Can you tell?

I've been using the hybrid Marshmellow Rolled Buttercream on cookies. So, I tried to cover one of my latest "candle cakes" in my gallery with it. YUP, no go. Ripped. I then tried the Chocolate MMF recipe I got from CC. Worked okay first time. Not so much, the second time.

Obviously I'm lacking in technique. I've only tried to cover a few cakes in my time. So - here's a couple questions:

(1) is MRB or MMF in general going to lack "that" elasticity that real fondant has?
(2) should I just throw in the towel & buy a dvd?
(3) the large wilton rolling pin...is this a great tool to have for rolling fondant thin enough?
(4) those cakers who do cover thier cakes in MMF based rolled icing....do you have a magic wand? Can I borrow it?


Thanks all!

18 replies
debbief Posted 2 Nov 2010 , 4:08am
post #2 of 19

I've never used the hybrid marshmallow rolled buttercream. Actually I've never heard of it, so I can't give any advice there. I tried chocolate mmf once and I must have used a bad recipe because it turned out way too stiff for me...and I haven't tried it since.

BUT, I use mmf all the time. I use this recipe a lot:

http://cakecentral.com/recipes/16228/buttercream-flavored-marshmallow-fondant

Sometimes I just make the basic mmf without all those extras that this recipe has. I've had good luck with both...and sometimes not so good luck with both. After you make it and work with it several times, you start to get a good idea of the consistency that works best for you, and the ratio of marshmallow to ps.

I've covered several cakes now with homemade mmf and it's getting easier. But I still have good batches and not so good batches. Takes a lot of practice to get it perfect...especially if you're a pefectionist icon_wink.gif

A dvd would actually be a good idea. Also, I've seen several tutorials on youtube that have helped me a lot. But again, the best advice I can give is practice practice. I wish I had a wand icon_wink.gif

I've never used a commercial brand fondant so can't make a comparison.
I use the large wilton roller and it works well for me. hth

EvMarie Posted 2 Nov 2010 , 6:22am
post #3 of 19

Thanks debbief -

I'm cursed with a short attention span. So, if I don't get it right the first couple times...I get so irritated with myself. But, I guess the practice part is super necessary. I watch a million times on tv these cake shows - they just pick up their fondant and slap it on there! Poof! Perfect!

Wellll, it's very true - looks are deceiving. I'll keep trying. Maybe smaller cakes are best for now & I'll try rolling it thinner, thicker...adding more p.s. or adding less p.s. I'm not terribly familiar with fondant in general so I'm not sure what it's really supposed to feel like.

Thanks again for your reply!

jenscreativity Posted 2 Nov 2010 , 6:31am
post #4 of 19

I hear you! I had good and bad batches..but ever since I sifted my p.s., I feel that it's gotten easier for me. I agree that I get soo jealous on tv when they just slap it on and cover no problem..lol..and I wish so badly I can get that smoothing technique down within seconds. Frustrating but keep working at it.

jobueno Posted 2 Nov 2010 , 1:26pm
post #5 of 19

Frankly I don't know why tat MMF recipe has dream whip in it. the recipe I sue is simply 1 bag marshmallows, 2 lbs powdered sugar, 2 Tbs flavoring,2 Tbs shortening and 6 Tbs water. I also add 2 Tbs corn syrup for pliability.

Start by greasing with the vegetebale shortening a microwave safe bowl. Add marshmallows, corn syrup and water and heat on high until melted completely. Add flavoring and about 6 cups PS and start mixing with a wooden spoon or you can mix it in your stand up mixer when the sugar is incorporated place it on the mat, counter or where ever you knead your doug and add the two remainig cups of sugar one at a time while kneading it in. You may not need all the PS sometimes you may need more depending on the weather.
If coloring is required add this to the marshmallows and water stage.

debbief Posted 2 Nov 2010 , 2:45pm
post #6 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by jobueno

Frankly I don't know why tat MMF recipe has dream whip in it. the recipe I sue is simply 1 bag marshmallows, 2 lbs powdered sugar, 2 Tbs flavoring,2 Tbs shortening and 6 Tbs water. I also add 2 Tbs corn syrup for pliability.

Start by greasing with the vegetebale shortening a microwave safe bowl. Add marshmallows, corn syrup and water and heat on high until melted completely. Add flavoring and about 6 cups PS and start mixing with a wooden spoon or you can mix it in your stand up mixer when the sugar is incorporated place it on the mat, counter or where ever you knead your doug and add the two remainig cups of sugar one at a time while kneading it in. You may not need all the PS sometimes you may need more depending on the weather.
If coloring is required add this to the marshmallows and water stage.




I believe the dream whip is in there strictly for flavor. I use basically the same ingredients/method that you use.

As jenscreativity said, DEFINATELY sift your ps. I used to start it out in my mixer, then I started to worry that it was too hard on it and I dont want to burn it out. I put the ps in a big mixing bowl and make a nice deep well to pour the liquid marshmallow mixture in. Then just keep folding the ps up around the liquid until it is incorporated enough that your hands won't get too sitcky. Keep a nice layer of crisco or butter on your hands as your kneading it.

Another thing that may help you is the "Mat" that a lot of people are talking about on here. I actually just use a big piece of vinyl that I got from the fabric store. It's really helpful for covering bigger cakes.

EvMarie Posted 2 Nov 2010 , 3:06pm
post #7 of 19

I'll give that MMF recipe a try that's listed in this post. Maybe I'll like it better than the one I have now. I have NOT tried all angles with the fondant thing. So...maybe the MRB is nice for cookies...but it may be that another recipe is just as good. AND, works on cakes.

Maybe all these people who are using MMF to cover cakes aren't using the recipe I have been using. I'll keep trying. And, yup....I heard about that mat. I'll have to put all these tools on my wish list.

I'm thinking that if lots of times I try to pick up my fondant to put it on a cake and it rips right away...something is off with my execution of the recipe. Or, the recipe is not great for cakes. I did try Wilton fondant YEARS ago on a cake that the people didn't intend to eat the fondant. Just wanted the look. I must say...it went on great. I covered 3 huge cakes that fit a floating tier cake stand. No problems. No puckers. Perfect. Beginners luck? Maybe.

I guess that's why I got so frustrated.....

debbief Posted 2 Nov 2010 , 3:18pm
post #8 of 19

Have you tried draping your fondant over your rolling pin to transfer it to the cake? This is the way I do it most of the time.

EvMarie Posted 2 Nov 2010 , 4:04pm
post #9 of 19

Actually, that's how I did it for the mini's I was experimenting with last week. I rolled it up loose around a rolling pin. There wasn't a huge need for it, cuz the cakes were so small. But I was just trying it for comfort level really.

Maybe it's too thick? If you look in my gallery at the mini cake with the little orange flowers, you can see the "round" of choc MMF I placed on top. Is it too thick?

You know, I have some extra ganache in the fridge & a cake layer in the freezer. I should practice again. Another mini. And, try to roll a bit thinner. And perhaps watch some tutorials to really pay attention to consistancy. Maybe I have too much ps.

debbief Posted 2 Nov 2010 , 4:50pm
post #10 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by EvMarie

Maybe it's too thick? If you look in my gallery at the mini cake with the little orange flowers, you can see the "round" of choc MMF I placed on top. Is it too thick?




First of all, that's a really pretty cake icon_smile.gif
I don't think it looks too thick. I've found if you roll it too thin, you may get spots where your cake will show through the fondant. Especially if the icing is darker than the fondant. It can also tear easily if it's too thin.

Like you said previously, maybe start with smaller, shorter cakes. Then once you get that down, try a little bit larger. It is so much easier to cover a smaller, even 1 layer cake. For me, it's when you get to the bottom of the cake that you start getting the puckers.

Don't try to smooth the fondant all the way to the bottom all at once. Work your way around the cake, making sure the fondant is smooth and adhered to the cake all the way around at the top and then moving down and around gradually untill you get to the bottom. It takes patience! hope that makes sense.

And remember, nobody (well almost nobody) can cover a cake pefectly EVERY time. That's what borders are for icon_wink.gif

EvMarie Posted 2 Nov 2010 , 6:18pm
post #11 of 19

I love, love, love borders! They are my friend!!! Yup, patience. Got it! Thanks for all the info. And, thanks for the compliment on the cake.

I'm just gonna try it one "area" at a time. Experimenting with thickness, more or less p.s., different recipe maybe, covering bc vs. covering ganache, etc. After beating like a dead horse, I should come out with a decent product!

Thanks for the replies!

Evoir Posted 2 Nov 2010 , 9:45pm
post #12 of 19

It gets easier, with practice. And not a whole lot of practice either, ONCE you find a fondant that works with your hands (ie whether you have hot hands, or sweaty hands can affect your fondant behaviour).

Is there any reason (besides cost) you won't use a commercial fondant?

playingwithsugar Posted 2 Nov 2010 , 9:57pm
post #13 of 19

Alright, folks, quit holding out on me.

Y'all know I was away for a while, until I got a new computer.

Please teach me about this hybrid fondant thingy.

Sigh, I've obviously missed so much, because every time I turn around, I'm finding out about something else I missed during that time.

Oh, and by the way, EvMarie, those candle cakes are pretty cool.

Theresa icon_smile.gif

EvMarie Posted 3 Nov 2010 , 12:53am
post #14 of 19

Evoir & playingwithsugar - - - I only really sell specialty cookies. Mini tarts, drop cookies, tea cookies...all kinds of cookies. (besides the classic pb & choc chip) I've introduced cut outs as a favor option and I do sell mini's cut outs as well. So - in developing my skills with cut outs I now use both royal icing and the second rolled icing I've ever tried. Marshmellow Rolled Buttercream....I believe that's what it's called in CC recipes.

I tried Rolled Buttercream - but found it too greasy. I wanted to try MMF. But, on my way to that I heard about this hybrid recipe that has both shortening and marshmellows. I liked the way it tasted and it got rid of the greasy appearance I didn't like. So....I just kept with it. I have been curious to try these MMF recipes that people use to cover cakes. Mainly because I'm developing my cake skills (as my personal hobby only) but I keep hearing about how inconsistant batches are. I just don't want that hassle.

It does help that these recipes are fairly inexpensive. I've heard great things about Satin Ice...but it's not available locally I don't think & cut outs are only a portion of my business. I did want to try Michelle Fosters Fondant. Which is just straight up real fondant I guess. And, that's fine by me...as long as it's tasty. I just keep forgetting to purchase glycerin.

Sooooo - I guess I'm on the hunt for the recipe that I work best with. Just like you said Evoir. I just didn't want to brush off the current recipe if I happened to be doing something wrong. I have some fabulous favor designs for cut outs using fondant & would love to get more confidence with fondant & how it works.

Oh - playingwithsugar - thanks for the compliment on the "candle cakes"! It was the first time I used ganache too!

Evoir Posted 3 Nov 2010 , 10:55pm
post #15 of 19

Okay - I understand where you are coming from a bit better now icon_smile.gif

Good luck with the hybrid fondant, I'd love to hear reviews for both cookie use and on cakes!

EvMarie Posted 3 Nov 2010 , 11:03pm
post #16 of 19

Evoir - I just made some monograms with my tappit tool using the hyrbrid recipe. It works okay. I made them last night about 8 pm. I sprayed them with airbrush, gold. I placed them on cookies about 4 pm today. It's much easier to work with them, once you've let them set for a while. Regular fondant, I'm assuming you would be able to use them after just a short while. At least, that's the impression I get.

I haven't had luck covering cakes with it. But again, I'm not super experienced. I will for sure try real fondant & then at least I have comparison point. As long as it tastes good, I'll probably just make the switch for cookies as well.

Evoir Posted 3 Nov 2010 , 11:12pm
post #17 of 19

That's good to know.

It is hard to experiment when its difficult and expensive to get commercial fondant!

noahsmummy Posted 4 Nov 2010 , 12:50am
post #18 of 19

i highly recommend michelle foster fondant. its great. i used to try with mmf but it would always go dry and crack and just generally look yuck..

EvMarie Posted 4 Nov 2010 , 2:06am
post #19 of 19

Thanks Noahsmummy - I don't make cake that often. However, next time I do, I'll make sure I include everything on the recipe for my shopping list. It just seems like I always have to buy some kind of new ingredient. I guess that's okay. It's just when I get carried away with trying all these new things....it does get a bit expensive.

I'm hoping that Michelle Foster's Fondant will work and taste great. I always feel like I'm working with in limitations with the fondant alternatives.

So - practice, practice, practice. I guess there's no way around it. Hopefully, MFF will be perfect & I can concentrate on getting better at covering cakes and coming up with neat cookie designs.

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