My Cake Looked Great, Tasted Great, But...

Decorating By tsal Updated 2 Nov 2010 , 2:29am by costumeczar

tsal Posted 1 Nov 2010 , 7:53pm
post #1 of 17

it was very difficult to serve!

I made a chiffon cake that was torted so that there were 2 layers of whipped cream filling. The tiers were about 4' high and when I cut the cake, the pieces kept falling apart at the whipped cream filling. I let it come to room temp before serving because I didn't want my SMBC to be too cold. Could that have been it?

I was totally embarrassed - red-faced in front of the hungry group that was waiting for cake while I was trying my best to cut nice-looking pieces. It was one of my biggest fears - having trouble cutting in front of a crowd. I could feel my face getting redder and redder!

Everyone was really nice and complimented me on the taste/texture of the cake, but where did I go wrong? I'm sure that the cake was not supposed to fall apart like that.

16 replies
DianeLM Posted 1 Nov 2010 , 8:19pm
post #2 of 17

I suggest, in the future, you cut your cakes like Indydebi.

http://cateritsimple.blogspot.com/search/label/cake-cutting

I ALWAYS cut cakes like that until I started doing cakes for others. For some reason, I thought it was the amateur way of cutting cakes.

So, I tried the outside wheel technique. Hated it. Tried the grid technique. Hated it.

At a recent gathering, I was commissioned to cut the cake (that I brought). Well, I had already had several glasses of wine by that time. I didn't even think about how I was going to cut the cake. I just did it the Indydebi way (regression maybe?) and never looked back.

tsal Posted 1 Nov 2010 , 10:36pm
post #3 of 17

I always use Indydebi's method - but when I tipped the slice over to cut it into smaller pieces, it cracked. That's why I'm wondering what happened.

costumeczar Posted 1 Nov 2010 , 11:10pm
post #4 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by tsal

I always use Indydebi's method - but when I tipped the slice over to cut it into smaller pieces, it cracked. That's why I'm wondering what happened.




Sometimes torted cakes just fall apart, there's not a whole lot you can do. When you cut the cake in the "square" method, make the first cut, then don't tip it over. Leaving it standing up will make it less likely to separate. You can put your hand or a second cake knife (depending on how coordinated you are) up against the side of the piece, cut the next piece off, then use the two knives to move the piece of cake that you just cut. I've always cut cakes this way, but I've never done the tipping-it-over step.

icer101 Posted 1 Nov 2010 , 11:36pm
post #5 of 17

Hi, sorry this happened. I always use indydebi's method. In my opinion, it is the best way. Remember , she is the queen on this site. everyone loves her b/c and her method of cutting the cake.she shows on her site, she uses the cake comb along with the knife to cut and move the cake slice to the plate.

costumeczar Posted 1 Nov 2010 , 11:42pm
post #6 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by icer101

Hi, sorry this happened. I always use indydebi's method. In my opinion, it is the best way. Remember , she is the queen on this site. everyone loves her b/c and her method of cutting the cake.she shows on her site, she uses the cake comb along with the knife to cut and move the cake slice to the plate.




But if this particular cake was falling apart when you turn it over, you shouldn't turn it over. Just leave it standing up and the square method will work just fine.

tsal Posted 1 Nov 2010 , 11:48pm
post #7 of 17

Thanks, Costumeczar. I think I will have to practice!

DianeLM Posted 2 Nov 2010 , 12:02am
post #8 of 17

When you say, "tip it over", did you just give it a nudge with the knife and yell, "TIMBER!", or did you support the other side as you laid it down?

The nice thing about this cutting and serving method is you can literally 'scoop' up the piece of cake, no matter what condition it landed in, as long as your serving tool is the right size.

costumeczar - I used to use the "cut the cake while standing and let the piece fall into the other hand" method. What I learned is that too many variables can go wrong. If the knife isn't sharp enough, squish. If the cake and filling are separating, the cake may not wait for you to catch it. icon_smile.gif

I used to send two pairs of disposable food-handling gloves with every cake. I wonder how many people actually used them. Yikes.

tsal Posted 2 Nov 2010 , 12:04am
post #9 of 17

Icer: just to be clear, I'm not blaming Indydebi's method - I'm wondering why my cake fell apart. I was thinking about the cake comb, but I think it might just be a matter of what costumeczar was saying. There might not have Bern anything I could have done.

I have a feeling that even if I would have cut it standing up, it would have fallen apart while being moved to a plate.

tsal Posted 2 Nov 2010 , 12:08am
post #10 of 17

Diane: I did not just yell 'Timber' (lol) and let it fall, I did support it. It was the bottom third that always broke.

Rose_N_Crantz Posted 2 Nov 2010 , 12:12am
post #11 of 17

Sounds like a cake comb could be a worthwhile investment.

costumeczar Posted 2 Nov 2010 , 12:24am
post #12 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by DianeLM

I used to send two pairs of disposable food-handling gloves with every cake. I wonder how many people actually used them. Yikes.




I saw the guy at the deli of the BJs near me actually wearing gloves and changing them between different ypes of meat he was cutting icon_surprised.gif Not that it has anything to do with cutting cake, but I was shocked to see someone actually using them the right way!

88nikki88 Posted 2 Nov 2010 , 12:38am
post #13 of 17

just to add some comic relief . . . I am SO glad I finally know what the heck a cake comb is supposed to be for!!!!! I've seen them, and thought maybe it was for some kind of decorating technique, LOL. Wow, do I have a lot to learn icon_eek.gif

costumeczar Posted 2 Nov 2010 , 12:53am
post #14 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by 88nikki88

just to add some comic relief . . . I am SO glad I finally know what the heck a cake comb is supposed to be for!!!!! I've seen them, and thought maybe it was for some kind of decorating technique, LOL. Wow, do I have a lot to learn icon_eek.gif




I think the thing that Indydebi uses is actually an angel food cake cutter, ( http://www.cheftools.com/Angel-Food-Cake-Cutter/productinfo/06-1169/ ) but some people refer to it as a comb because it looks like that. There are cake combs that you use to put the ridged design on the side of cakes, http://www.cheftools.com/Ateco-Icing-Comb-&-Smoother/productinfo/02-0328+++01/ so you're not really wrong, it's just the different terms being used. icon_smile.gif

88nikki88 Posted 2 Nov 2010 , 1:08am
post #15 of 17

Thanks for the heads up! icon_smile.gif

DianeLM Posted 2 Nov 2010 , 2:27am
post #16 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar

Quote:
Originally Posted by DianeLM

I used to send two pairs of disposable food-handling gloves with every cake. I wonder how many people actually used them. Yikes.



I saw the guy at the deli of the BJs near me actually wearing gloves and changing them between different ypes of meat he was cutting icon_surprised.gif Not that it has anything to do with cutting cake, but I was shocked to see someone actually using them the right way!




Wow! That's a refreshing sight. I was in a Subway restaurant once and saw the kid behind the counter make a sandwich, handle money and the cash register, go back to sandwich making -- all with the same pair of gloves. That's why I went to Subway "once" icon_smile.gif

costumeczar Posted 2 Nov 2010 , 2:29am
post #17 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by DianeLM

Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar

Quote:
Originally Posted by DianeLM

I used to send two pairs of disposable food-handling gloves with every cake. I wonder how many people actually used them. Yikes.



I saw the guy at the deli of the BJs near me actually wearing gloves and changing them between different ypes of meat he was cutting icon_surprised.gif Not that it has anything to do with cutting cake, but I was shocked to see someone actually using them the right way!



Wow! That's a refreshing sight. I was in a Subway restaurant once and saw the kid behind the counter make a sandwich, handle money and the cash register, go back to sandwich making -- all with the same pair of gloves. That's why I went to Subway "once" icon_smile.gif




Haha, at least he didn't scratch himself too. Ugh.

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