lomfise Posted 31 Oct 2010 , 6:52pm
post #1 of

I'm considering making personalized cookies for my family this Christmas, for instance soccer cookies for one cousin and shopping cookies for another, but I'm at a loss as to what cookies to make for my aunt who has cancer. icon_cry.gif
My first thought was to make cookies like a pill glass and perhaps some pills, but my mother thinks (and I agree) that it might be a bit inconsiderate and stupid.
My aunt used to knit a lot and play bingo, but I don't want to remind her of things she can't do any more. These days she doesn't do much at all.
So I would really appreciate ideas for this. I'm thinking there'll be one or two larger cookies, and then three or four smaller cookies, but other plans are welcome.

17 replies
cake_architect Posted 31 Oct 2010 , 7:51pm
post #2 of

what if you just make her christmas themed cookies? like bells or candy cane shapes? or you could even make her small gingerbread men and decorate them differently. or maybe find out her favorite flower and make her those? my father had cancer and i know he never liked being reminded about his sickness, he just wanted to be treated like everyone else. so yeah, just try and avoid the sickness and focus on something more enjoyable =D

Marla84 Posted 31 Oct 2010 , 8:46pm
post #3 of

What type of cookies would you have made for your aunt if she didn't have cancer? Go with those. A cancer diagnosis does not define a person. She still has likes, interests and favorite things. If you are uncomfortable personalizing them to a hobby she is no longer able to do, I think, as manda suggested, a holiday theme, flowers, or a design incorporating her favorite colors are appropriate.

DuxDay Posted 31 Oct 2010 , 9:00pm
post #4 of

I also make a lot of cookies for people fighting cancer.. I make the Cancer Ribbon cookies frequently. (There is a cookie cutter for this). You can then decorate the ribbon in the color that defines the type of cancer she has (ie: pink ribbons for Breast Cancer, etc). You can then take an edible marker and write a message on each ribbon cookie. ie: HOPE, INSPIRE, BELIEVE, COURAGE, HERO, etc.

trajones Posted 31 Oct 2010 , 9:09pm
post #5 of

Agree with DuxDay wholeheartedly. My mother has stage 4 breast cancer and my mother in law has breast cancer (early stage) as well. Both of them would love those with the ribbon and message of hope.

Marla84 Posted 31 Oct 2010 , 9:56pm
post #6 of

I'm sorry but I disagree with the ribbon idea. Yes, there are some people who are active fundraisers and advocates for their disease - and if this describes the OP's aunt, then maybe the ribbon cookies could work. In the years I spent working with individuals dealing with chronic illness, as well as my personal experience with my brother and a friend having cancer, I can tell you that many people would be upset with a ribbon type cookie. To us, it may be a message of hope, but if everyone else is getting a cookie based on a favorite activity or hobby, a cancer cookie can be an insult. Now, if the OP makes an entire plate of ribbon cookies for everyone to share in support and honor of her aunt, (and forgets the personalized soccer balls, shopping cookies, etc.) this would be more appropriate. trajones, I respect your opinion and experiences as well, and wish the best for your mother and mother-in-law. I just think this is a sensitive and very personal issue and that even the best intentions can be viewed as defining or labeling someone by their illness.

CookieCrazy_grozzie11 Posted 31 Oct 2010 , 10:28pm
post #7 of

What an awful and sensitive subject. I have to agree with Marla84, in the sense that they have every other day of the year to think of the big C,. I would personally prefer to have a day where I wasn't reminded of it. And a christmas theme would do that. As a very active supporter of breast cancer its still nice to be able to not think about it for a day.

Trajones I wish you and your family every ounce of stregth and courage that you need and for some happiness also. Best wishes to you all.

lomfise Posted 1 Nov 2010 , 6:58am
post #8 of

Hi all
Thanks for your replies. Trajones, I'm sorry to hear about your mother and mother in law, I hope they will get better soon. Cancer is unfortunately an all too common disease icon_cry.gif

I had thought of the pink cancer ribbon, but as I understand it that is the symbol for breast cancer and my aunt has lung cancer, and I think I would prefer not to make anything that reminds her of her illness just for that one day.

I've made her flower cookies before and wanted to make something new, and I like the idea of making her christmas themed cookies, I think she would like that. Or I might try to replicate some of her favourite food or drink, I will be trying an Irish Coffee cookie for my uncle icon_biggrin.gif

Thanks for all your help, and (a bit early I know) have a wonderful Christmas. icon_lol.gif

pixiefuncakes Posted 1 Nov 2010 , 7:33am
post #9 of

I am sorry to hear about your Aunt, it is an insidious disease.
Why don't you make her lovehearts? It will remind her that she is loved!

trajones Posted 1 Nov 2010 , 3:42pm

Thank you to all for the kind wishes.. I still believe that as long as there is breath...there is hope!! We are fighting!!

LillyCakes Posted 1 Nov 2010 , 4:01pm

I work for a large cancer institution and we have buttons that say things like "Cancer Sucks" or "Only ONE Me'. The patients here really like these kinds of buttons and sayings. If she is taking it hard I would go with the idea of inspirational words. If not then go with something humerous. Our patients have Leukemia and 80% of them are happy people who have open minds that love both inspiration and laughing. I asked a patient what he was going to be for Halloween and his reply was 'a cancer patient'!!! So I would just judge her mood about her situation and go from there.

lomfise Posted 1 Nov 2010 , 6:27pm

Hi all

You've really given me something to think about with your ideas. Luckily there's still a long time for Christmas, and I will spend the next few weeks pondering all you've said here. I think there are some very good suggestions, and I might end up combining some of them.

Thanks for your help icon_biggrin.gif

alsiemen Posted 1 Nov 2010 , 7:00pm

My husband died in Aug of stage 4 stomach cancer at the age of 30. He couldn't eat shortly after his diagnosis at Christmas and even before he was IV fed he could only eat certain things. Can your aunt eat? I would really hate for you to spend so much time and thought on this if it isn't something she can have or it is something that doesn't go down well. From living with someone with cancer I hated having anything that reminded me of the cancer at the house. Even flowers were a "sick" reminder. I would go for something besides cancer related cookies...but that is only my opinion.

TracyLH Posted 1 Nov 2010 , 9:38pm

I am so very sorry to hear of those who have lost loved ones to cancer. So very sorry.

I made cookies for a woman who underwent surgery for brain cancer and made her an assortment of cheery bright flowers, monogram cookies and cute ladybugs. I was told that they really made her smile. I would go for bright and cheery. As was mentioned, the cancer does not define her. I love the idea of Christmas or winter cookies. Perhaps some cheery snowmen, snowflakes, mittens, etc. Just something to bring a smile to her face.

Kiddiekakes Posted 1 Nov 2010 , 10:54pm

I too am very sorry for all those who have a loved one/friend fighting cancer...

alsiemen...My heart goes out to you losing your husband so young....Very Sad...I almost lost my husband of 11 years last spring but luckily it wasn't to cancer...

I would make cookies that are festive and cheery not a reminder of the illness.

lomfise Posted 2 Nov 2010 , 8:09pm

Alsiemen, I'm so sorry to hear about your husband, 30 years old is much too young to be taken from his family and friends. My heart goes out to you.
My aunt can luckily still eat most things, though not as much of it, and the only effects of the kemo so far is that she is easily tired.

I've put all your ideas to my mother, and we discussed this for a while, but I've decided to stick with a coffeecup cookie, a teaspoon cookie, some coffebean cookies and a "normal" chocolate chip cookie.

As my other aunt will be getting something similar just with tea, I think my aunt (with cancer) won't feel that she's in any way pitied or that we're trying to treat her in any way special. For just that one night I want her to feel that she is just like the rest of us and be able to forget that she is ill.

Thanks again for all your help, and lets all work at fighting cancer thumbs_up.gif

cakeythings1961 Posted 2 Nov 2010 , 10:05pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by lomfise

Alsiemen, I'm so sorry to hear about your husband, 30 years old is much too young to be taken from his family and friends. My heart goes out to you.
My aunt can luckily still eat most things, though not as much of it, and the only effects of the kemo so far is that she is easily tired.

I've put all your ideas to my mother, and we discussed this for a while, but I've decided to stick with a coffeecup cookie, a teaspoon cookie, some coffebean cookies and a "normal" chocolate chip cookie.

As my other aunt will be getting something similar just with tea, I think my aunt (with cancer) won't feel that she's in any way pitied or that we're trying to treat her in any way special. For just that one night I want her to feel that she is just like the rest of us and be able to forget that she is ill.

Thanks again for all your help, and lets all work at fighting cancer thumbs_up.gif




I think this is a lovely idea. And how thoughtful of you to put so much effort into finding just the right theme for her cookie treats....your aunt must be very special to you. icon_smile.gif

Babs1964 Posted 2 Nov 2010 , 10:31pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marla84

I'm sorry but I disagree with the ribbon idea. Yes, there are some people who are active fundraisers and advocates for their disease - and if this describes the OP's aunt, then maybe the ribbon cookies could work. In the years I spent working with individuals dealing with chronic illness, as well as my personal experience with my brother and a friend having cancer, I can tell you that many people would be upset with a ribbon type cookie. To us, it may be a message of hope, but if everyone else is getting a cookie based on a favorite activity or hobby, a cancer cookie can be an insult. Now, if the OP makes an entire plate of ribbon cookies for everyone to share in support and honor of her aunt, (and forgets the personalized soccer balls, shopping cookies, etc.) this would be more appropriate. trajones, I respect your opinion and experiences as well, and wish the best for your mother and mother-in-law. I just think this is a sensitive and very personal issue and that even the best intentions can be viewed as defining or labeling someone by their illness.




I couldn't agree more!

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