Pricing For Individual Cakes.

Decorating By jessielou Updated 4 Nov 2010 , 3:21am by -K8memphis

jessielou Posted 29 Oct 2010 , 6:08pm
post #1 of 61

I just met with a bride who wants 24 individual 6 inch rounds(one for each table) plus a 3 tiered cake. Probably 10,8,6. How do I go about pricing that?? Still by serving? TIA! Jessica

60 replies
AmysCakesNCandies Posted 29 Oct 2010 , 7:43pm
post #2 of 61

You could price it by the serving but use a higher per serving rate than you normally would (I would suggest .50-.75 more). I did 12- 8" cakes to put on each table for a wedding and it took a whole lot longer and more supplies than making 1 larger cake would have.

indydebi Posted 30 Oct 2010 , 8:11am
post #3 of 61

I'm going to assume a 2-layer 6" cake? Which serves 12, according to the Wilton Wedding chart.

What brides fail to understand is that when they order a cake that serves 12, they are paying for a cake that serves 12. I dont' care if there are only 6 or 8 people seated at the table .... she is paying for 12 servings.

The reason individual cakes are more expensive is the bride is buying MORE cake than she needs.

There is also a higher labor cost for you. 24, 2-layer, 6" cakes means you are going to prep and wash 48 cake pans. As opposed to just a simple 4 tier cake where you are going to only have to prep and wash 8 cake pans. There's a cost to that.

Transporting 24 6" cakes as compared to one 4 tier cake? More trips back and forth from teh van to the venue PLUS set up time takes longer, i.e. our employee (even if it's just you, you have to think like a business owner on this one!) is on the clock longer which increases my payroll expense.

By the way, 24 6" cakes that serve 12 each = 288 servings PLUS the 3 tier cake????? Just how many did she invite to this shindig?

And since I can't stand working with 6" cakes, there is DEFINITELY a PITA charge on these!

ramacake Posted 30 Oct 2010 , 10:10am
post #4 of 61

I had a wedding last year and had to do 36 6" square cakes. I never do like dealing with 6" cakes, and being square made it even harder. I charged $75.00 for each cake and By the time I was done, I was totally convinced that I should have charged more!!!

indydebi Posted 30 Oct 2010 , 10:49am
post #5 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by ramacake

I had a wedding last year and had to do 36 6" square cakes. I never do like dealing with 6" cakes, and being square made it even harder. I charged $75.00 for each cake and By the time I was done, I was totally convinced that I should have charged more!!!



icon_surprised.gif And just to illustrate how brides often buy too much cake: Did this bride REALLY have 648 people there? (18 servings per cake x 36 cakes).

jessielou Posted 30 Oct 2010 , 4:43pm
post #6 of 61

I know it's going to be a buttload of work and and even bigger buttload of cake. She did say that they were planning on about 300 people. Ive just never done ANYTHING like this so I have know idea how to charge. And did I mention I only have two 6in pans!!! icon_eek.gif lol It will be LONG day of baking! So do you think charging per cake is the way to go or per serving?

TammyH Posted 30 Oct 2010 , 5:07pm
post #7 of 61

I did something similar a few years ago. Instead of a 6-inch dbl layer, I went with an 8x3 (split and filled). I found them easier to frost/decorate and that way I only had to bake one cake per table. I also though it looked nicer (they were used as the centerpiece for each table). I did purchase a few extra 8x3 pans. And yes, the bride had WWAAYYY too much cake! for the 3-tiered cake, only the top 2 tiers were real (the bottom was a dummy). They still paid as if it were real because of the time to decorate.

HTH

TammyH

caymancake Posted 30 Oct 2010 , 6:45pm
post #8 of 61

Personally, I have a base rate for individual cakes, and then I charge "per serving" for my tiered cakes.

For 6 inch rounds, I usually charge between $25-30, but that is for very SIMPLE decorations. I would imagine for centerpiece cakes, they would involve a lot more work. I have found that smaller cakes do take extra work!

My advice is, come up with an individual price per cake (as if the bride was just asking for one) AND come up with your per serving rate. Whichever works out best in your favour - go with. Because that order is going to take up A LOT Of time!

I would also invest in a few more 6 inch rounds!!!! It may be worth it in the long run for you.

I hope it works out for you!

-K8memphis Posted 30 Oct 2010 , 7:43pm
post #9 of 61

I would definitely present them with the per cake rate. But have that all prepared in advance. Like if you charge $4 per serving and a 6" round serves 12 then 6" rounds are $48. Figure it out for 6" squares and so on. So have it priced 'per cake' according to your per serving rate. Plus $5 or $10 bucks for the pia fee--so 6" rounds are $53 to $58 each. Just get your chart all ready.

Think of this way too--they are not paying a florist for centerpieces and it's a ton of work.

Another issue--6" cakes look like toilet paper rolls!!!! icon_biggrin.gif

indydebi Posted 30 Oct 2010 , 7:45pm
post #10 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by caymancake

For 6 inch rounds, I usually charge between $25-30, but that is for very SIMPLE decorations. I would imagine for centerpiece cakes, they would involve a lot more work. I have found that smaller cakes do take extra work!



My standard price was $3.50/serving times twelve servings in a 6" round = $42 standard price. It would definitely be even more than that for this PITA job.

and yes .... GET MORE PANS! or you will be baking for days and days! icon_lol.gif

blissfulbaker Posted 30 Oct 2010 , 8:04pm
post #11 of 61

Collette Peters once gave me some great advice ... if it is a job you really don't want to do or it is going to be a huge PITA make sure you over charge for it. Otherwise you will be kicking yourself in the butt the entire time. She felt if she wasn't going to make extra for a PITA job then it wasn't worth it. BTW...she also complained about having a bride who wanted individual cakes for each table. Her reasoning was almost identical to indydebi... I guess great minds think alike!

3GCakes Posted 30 Oct 2010 , 8:12pm
post #12 of 61

You'll also need to purchase 24 cake drums or nice boards...or have to MAKE 24 boards....instead of just one....time and money!

indydebi Posted 30 Oct 2010 , 8:42pm
post #13 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by blissfulbaker

Collette Peters once gave me some great advice ... .... Her reasoning was almost identical to indydebi... I guess great minds think alike!



WOW! I'm printing this and framing it!! icon_surprised.gif

EvMarie Posted 30 Oct 2010 , 9:09pm
post #14 of 61

Holy Cow man!!! I was just thinking of the same thing....pricing for individual cakes. I don't sell cakes anymore, I found my learning curve wasn't as "speedy" as I'd hoped. But I still do practice and for now...stick to cookies!

I just made what I lovingly call: candle cakes. They are in my gallery. I used a biscuit cutter for 3 layers & frosted with ganache. I attempted chocolate mmf on one & had a semi cake disaster with the other using regular marshmellow rolled buttercream fondant.

Being at beginner level - I spent way too much time on it. I WAS learning something new..but jeepers! It was a ton of work. I believe in the over charge thing. Especially if it's gonna be a task. You'll be ready to punch yourself in the eye if you "are nice about the pricing". Also...I don't know your level of expertise...but take that into consideration for your timeline!

Good Luck! And, much respect to you expert cakers!

texanlostlover Posted 30 Oct 2010 , 9:51pm
post #15 of 61

I totally agree with all the previous posters about "overcharging" since this will be a TON of work. Another thing you should consider is renting pans, if your local cake supply store does that. If you could rent a bunch of 6in rounds for this, that would cut your baking time down quite a bit. And you could call and find out how much it will cost you and how many they have, and divide that price by the number of cakes, to give you an idea of how much to add on to cover your extra costs.

3GCakes Posted 30 Oct 2010 , 10:12pm
post #16 of 61

I teach cake decorating at my local Middle/High school.

I bake 25 6' rounds each week. I have 9 pans in at once and it takes me 4 hours to bake straight cake mix.

jessielou Posted 31 Oct 2010 , 3:35am
post #17 of 61

ok so I was thinking about $50 for each 6 in. After reading all of your comments I feel like thats pretty fair. (for Her icon_wink.gif ) I just recieved an email from her asking if I could make the tiered cake larger!!! SERIOUSLY? Are you feeding the entire town???? I dont even know that many people let alone think there will be that many at my wedding!!

EvMarie Posted 31 Oct 2010 , 7:58pm
post #18 of 61

oh my goodness....she has a cake per table &&&& a gi-normous tiered cake. Who is going to eat the tiered cake? Did I miss a post where part of it is a dummy?

Holy Cow....

leah_s Posted 31 Oct 2010 , 8:03pm
post #19 of 61

I'm always the odd gal out in these centerpiece cake discussion. I LOVE them. DH LOVES delivering them. I think they're totally easy.

My rules: 6" only, round only, I get to pick the flavors.

After they're baked, torted and settled, I base ice and then have one on the turntable and one in the freezer setting up. I can knock these things out in 10-15 minutes, pipe on some decoration, slap on a fondant ribbon and done! No stacking. Easy! Love 'em! I chose centerpiece cakes for our daughter's reception (20 of them.)

I did centerpiece cakes (only icon_cool.gif for a wedding yesterday. Love, Love, Love them!

-K8memphis Posted 31 Oct 2010 , 10:11pm
post #20 of 61

Leah, the idea of no stacking is always very appealing, I agree. And I think 6 inchers are better than cupcakes--at least you have one per table rather than one per each guest to move around over & over.

I really like that you're not low balling yourself on the price too, Jessielou.
Be firm!

leah_s Posted 31 Oct 2010 , 10:18pm
post #21 of 61

I did the ones yesterday for $38 each for the 6" round. The piped on decorations took every bit of 4 minutes per cake.

-K8memphis Posted 31 Oct 2010 , 10:21pm
post #22 of 61

Leah, yeah but she might not be as fast as you. When she gets that fast she can cave a little on her price, or raise it. icon_biggrin.gif

jessielou Posted 1 Nov 2010 , 1:54am
post #23 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s

I'm always the odd gal out in these centerpiece cake discussion. I LOVE them. DH LOVES delivering them. I think they're totally easy.

My rules: 6" only, round only, I get to pick the flavors.

After they're baked, torted and settled, I base ice and then have one on the turntable and one in the freezer setting up. I can knock these things out in 10-15 minutes, pipe on some decoration, slap on a fondant ribbon and done! No stacking. Easy! Love 'em! I chose centerpiece cakes for our daughter's reception (20 of them.)

I did centerpiece cakes (only icon_cool.gif for a wedding yesterday. Love, Love, Love them!




Yah 6 in rounds dont bother me either. Ive just never done so many at once. Plus the tiered cake!! Its a little intimidating. She does want a very simple design though. The 6in rounds will be bc with fondant ribbon and bow around the bottom and fondant polka dots all over. The wedding cake she wants fondant..same decorations.

EvMarie Posted 1 Nov 2010 , 2:06am
post #24 of 61

Jessielou - I think you can do it. My cake learning curve is still in progress and knowing what kind of decoration she wants on these cakes...Outside of being nervous about the stacking...I'd even be tempted to take the order on.

If you prepare all the decorations before the fact...does it feel less intimidating? I mean, you could prep a bazillion polka dots ahead of time. And, the bows will be done ahead of time for dry time, right? I'm not sure how you'd prep the ribbons....will they stay soft enough in an airtight containter?

When you look at it that way...you'd just be assembling and smoothing. You pics look very nice. I think you can do it. Try mapping out a time line on paper. You may feel more confident that way. Feels like stages (1) decoration prep/cake bases (2) baking/freezing (3) buttercream mixing......then you're ready for the big week. Just assemble & delivery.

I hope it works out for you...

jessielou Posted 3 Nov 2010 , 1:07pm
post #25 of 61

Well it doesnt matter now as I sent her a quote yesterday and recieved an email this morning saying she was going with someone else. Im second guessing my price now but Im making myself stand my ground (no matter how much I want to cave!) Ugh I hate being a people pleaser! lol
Thanks for all your help everyone!

EvMarie Posted 3 Nov 2010 , 3:36pm
post #26 of 61

I'm not trying to hijack....but, do any of you entertain the idea of larger slices? I mean, in the world of my family. Wedding or not, my goodness...that many people out of a 6 inch?

I'm sure you'd have to adjust pricing. But, to me....lover of cake, I'd want a piece twice as big.

Just curious - anyone ever request bigger cake due to larger slices????

OP - don't worry. If you felt confident in your price, just let it go. Working smart is always better than working hard. I had a lady tell me my baby carriage cookie favors were too much $. They were VERY reasonable...especially when you consider online favors. I just told her, politely, "I hope you have a great time at the shower". No hard feelings - she wasn't "my" customer. I got the whole state of OH!!!! No worries....

indydebi Posted 3 Nov 2010 , 6:01pm
post #27 of 61

No, we dont' entertain the thought of bigger slices. If the client wants to cut the pieces bigger, then they need to buy more cake.

A can of cambell's soup says it serves 2.5 people. bull. Not in my world it doesn't. But i dont' buy just one can and then complain because it's not big enough. I KNOW its not big enough and i KNOW i'm going to eat more soup than that so I KNOW I have to buy more than one can.

see the KFC comparison here: http://cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-662684-kfc.html

BluntlySpeakingKarma Posted 3 Nov 2010 , 6:17pm
post #28 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by -K8memphis

Another issue--6" cakes look like toilet paper rolls!!!! icon_biggrin.gif




Really? Never noticed that before. Usually, done nicely, they look like cute little cakes.

BluntlySpeakingKarma Posted 3 Nov 2010 , 6:18pm
post #29 of 61

I think flowery, over piped busy sheetcakes look old fashioned and frumpy. Old ladyish. icon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gif

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