How To Cover Cake In Fondant Once Its Been Chilled?

Decorating By pag41989 Updated 29 Oct 2010 , 1:47pm by toni1218

pag41989 Posted 28 Oct 2010 , 2:07pm
post #1 of 8

Hello everyone,
I have a cake that I am finishing (hopefully) tonight and the two layers are currently sitting in the fridge iced and ready to be covered in fondant. Is there anything I should do to them before I cover the cake? Will the fondant stick since the buttercream is so solid? I am trying out a new fondant covering method and I am unsure as to what to do. Thanks!

7 replies
alvarezmom Posted 28 Oct 2010 , 2:17pm
post #2 of 8

NOrmally when I chill a cake over night and plan to add fondant the nect day I pull the cake(s) out and let them come to room tempature then add the fondant. I normally wait about 20 minutes then touch the cake with my finger if a little icing comes up then I know it's okay to cover.

toni1218 Posted 28 Oct 2010 , 7:50pm
post #3 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by alvarezmom

NOrmally when I chill a cake over night and plan to add fondant the nect day I pull the cake(s) out and let them come to room tempature then add the fondant. I normally wait about 20 minutes then touch the cake with my finger if a little icing comes up then I know it's okay to cover.




I was told the same thing by someone, not to fondant a really cold cake otherwise you will get a bubble under the fondant. Other posts I have read say to chill the cake and put the fondant on - not sure if they wait a bit, however they do mention that the icing is very firm so I am guessing that they don't let it coom to room temp. Isn't it hard to place the fondant or reposition fondant if the icing is coming up? This is my 2nd fondant cake and the first was a disaster so I am hoping this one works out. Any help is greatly appreciated.

Texas_Rose Posted 28 Oct 2010 , 8:00pm
post #4 of 8

I chill my cakes before I cover them. I don't let it warm up before I cover it. Basically, after I roll out the fondant, I pull the cake out of the fridge and the fondant goes on right then. I use a crusting buttercream and it's crusted before I put the fondant on. The cake will develop a little bit of condensation that will help the fondant stick to the cake. I've never had an air bubble or a blowout since I started using this method.

toni1218 Posted 28 Oct 2010 , 8:17pm
post #5 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texas_Rose

I chill my cakes before I cover them. I don't let it warm up before I cover it. Basically, after I roll out the fondant, I pull the cake out of the fridge and the fondant goes on right then. I use a crusting buttercream and it's crusted before I put the fondant on. The cake will develop a little bit of condensation that will help the fondant stick to the cake. I've never had an air bubble or a blowout since I started using this method.




How long do you chill your cakes for? Is there such a thing as "overchilling" a cake?? What would be a good amount of time?

Thanks icon_smile.gif

thecakeprincess Posted 28 Oct 2010 , 9:09pm
post #6 of 8

I'd also like to know.

mayo2222 Posted 28 Oct 2010 , 9:21pm
post #7 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by toni1218

Quote:
Originally Posted by alvarezmom

NOrmally when I chill a cake over night and plan to add fondant the nect day I pull the cake(s) out and let them come to room tempature then add the fondant. I normally wait about 20 minutes then touch the cake with my finger if a little icing comes up then I know it's okay to cover.



I was told the same thing by someone, not to fondant a really cold cake otherwise you will get a bubble under the fondant. Other posts I have read say to chill the cake and put the fondant on - not sure if they wait a bit, however they do mention that the icing is very firm so I am guessing that they don't let it coom to room temp. Isn't it hard to place the fondant or reposition fondant if the icing is coming up? This is my 2nd fondant cake and the first was a disaster so I am hoping this one works out. Any help is greatly appreciated.




Are you using a crusting buttercream?

toni1218 Posted 29 Oct 2010 , 1:47pm
post #8 of 8

Are you using a crusting buttercream?[/quote]

Yes it is a crusting buttercream.

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