Ganache Tip

Lounge By vickistark Updated 29 Oct 2010 , 6:36pm by vickistark

vickistark Posted 27 Oct 2010 , 6:48am
post #1 of 13

I just read on the net that in order to get that silky smooth ganache everyone so desires you must heat your heavy cream to optimum temp of 90-110 degrees. I can't wait to try this and I hope this helps someone else as well!

12 replies
LindaF144a Posted 27 Oct 2010 , 11:55am
post #2 of 13

Actually in the book where I got my ganache recipe, it says to heat the cream to almost boiling. You will see bubbles forming around the edge of the pan. I believe that is higher than 110 degrees. So visually that is a good way to know it is hot enough.

Coral3 Posted 28 Oct 2010 , 8:10am
post #3 of 13

I always heat the cream until it boils.

debbief Posted 28 Oct 2010 , 3:50pm
post #4 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coral3

I always heat the cream until it boils.




me too. Will it even melt the chocolate at 90-110? Or are you starting with melted chocolate?

debbief Posted 28 Oct 2010 , 4:50pm
post #6 of 13
Quote:




Ahh now it makes sense. So according to this article, they do bring the cream to a boil before pouring over chocolate. It states "The optimal emulsification temperature for ganache is 90 degrees to 110 degrees F". So the temp of 90-110 comes after the cream is poured over the chocolate and has allowed to sit for 1 minute, then stirred together. You have to figure the temp is going to drop considerably after pouring over the chocolate and sitting for a minute.

Good article, makes a lot more sense after reading.

LindaF144a Posted 28 Oct 2010 , 5:17pm
post #7 of 13

I see she cites The Secrets of Baking. That is an excellent book. However, i disagree with a couple of her statements. Aside from the optimal temperature thing being the only way to make good ganache ( just not true). And she said so herself when she heated up cream in the microwave. The other thing is that milk chocolate does not necessarily have more cocoa butter. It has milk added, thus the reason why it is called milk chocolate.

The amount of cocoa butter in chocolate varies so much from brand to brand that it is usually kept as a trade secret. But the higher the quality of chocolate, and price, the more cocoa butter you will find in the prduct. Even an off brand store brand can have less than cocoa butter thanone would expect. There are a lot of "chocolates" used that contain partially hydrogenated vegetable shortening in place fir some or all of the cocoa butter. Chocolate has to have a minumum amount of cocoa butter to be classified as chocolate by law. That is why you see that teeny tiny word flavor on some products.

Thus if you want a real good ganache, go with the most expensive chocolate you can afford or find. You will be amazed at the differencd. Even candy melts can be used for ganache. I have seen it done.

Here are some real good books to read about chocolate, ganache and the chocolate industry:

The Cake Bible by Rose Levenbaum
How Baking Works by Paula Figoni
Bakewise by Shirley Corriher

So go ahead, boil the cream. That part of making ganache will not hurt it. I have never seen anybody talk about boiling to a certain temp with a candy thermometor like we do when making SMBC or IMBC. If it were that important you would find it all over CC and the internet. Now underheat itnto only about 110 degrees and yes you coukd have some problems, depending on the amount of chocolate to cream ratio. Sometimes i think some pastry-trained experts trip over themselves too much too sound too knowledgeable.

Edited to add: sorry for all the typos. I use my ipad and sometimes it is too much of a pain to go back and correct.

Karen421 Posted 29 Oct 2010 , 12:29am
post #8 of 13
cabecakes Posted 29 Oct 2010 , 9:37am
post #9 of 13

Does anyone have a recipe for ganache made from cocoa instead of chocolate. Sorry OP I didn't mean to highjack your thread. Just curious.

Bluehue Posted 29 Oct 2010 , 10:30am
post #10 of 13

After boiling my cream and pouring it over my broken up chocolate - i then turn on my KA with the paddle attachement and let it do its own thing for about 3 minutes
Stopping to scrape the sides every 40 seconds or so.

If i wish to *pour* the ganache over a cake and get the drizzled effect - i wait till it has cooled slightly - then pour.

If i wish to use the ganache as fill and then cover my cake before the fondant goes over it - i let my ganache set up over night on the kitchen bench... that way it has become spreable .

Never read or heard about how ones cream must be a certain temperature...
Just another step to confuse those who are already confused.
Glory knows why something as simple as making ganache has to be portrayed as rocket science. icon_rolleyes.gif ....perhaps it helps sell books icon_lol.gificon_lol.gif

Bluehue

Karen421 Posted 29 Oct 2010 , 12:03pm
post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluehue

. . . . . .Never read or heard about how ones cream must be a certain temperature...
Just another step to confuse those who are already confused.
Glory knows why something as simple as making ganache has to be portrayed as rocket science. icon_rolleyes.gif ....perhaps it helps sell books icon_lol.gificon_lol.gif

Bluehue




I sooo agree - unless you get some moisture in the chocolate - it's really pretty easy and a whole lot of yummy fun experimenting! I too use my KA to mix until smooth, and my family likes it whipped best. If after letting it set up it is to runny - I add more chocolate. If it is to firm - I add a little more Heavy cream. thumbs_up.gif

7yyrt Posted 29 Oct 2010 , 2:48pm
post #12 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by cabecakes

Does anyone have a recipe for ganache made from cocoa instead of chocolate? Sorry OP I didn't mean to hijack your thread. Just curious.



ooh, ooh!
Count me as a second plea for a recipe!
- edit-
Did a search, and this is the only thing I can find that's even close -
http://find.myrecipes.com/recipes/recipefinder.dyn?action=displayRecipe&recipe_id=10000000428092
# Ganache:
# 1/2 cup granulated sugar
# 1/4 cup unsweetened cocoa
# 1/3 cup fat-free milk
# 1 (4-ounce) bar semisweet chocolate, chopped
To prepare ganache, combine 1/2 cup granulated sugar, cocoa, and milk in a medium saucepan over medium heat; bring mixture to a boil, stirring frequently. Cook 1 minute, stirring constantly. Remove from heat, and add chocolate, stirring until smooth. Spread ganache evenly over top and sides of cake; let stand 20 minutes or until set.

vickistark Posted 29 Oct 2010 , 6:36pm
post #13 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluehue

After boiling my cream and pouring it over my broken up chocolate - i then turn on my KA with the paddle attachement and let it do its own thing for about 3 minutes
Stopping to scrape the sides every 40 seconds or so.

If i wish to *pour* the ganache over a cake and get the drizzled effect - i wait till it has cooled slightly - then pour.

If i wish to use the ganache as fill and then cover my cake before the fondant goes over it - i let my ganache set up over night on the kitchen bench... that way it has become spreable .

Never read or heard about how ones cream must be a certain temperature...
Just another step to confuse those who are already confused.
Glory knows why something as simple as making ganache has to be portrayed as rocket science. icon_rolleyes.gif ....perhaps it helps sell books icon_lol.gificon_lol.gif

Bluehue


hahahha, leave it to me to make something so simple seem so complicated! icon_smile.gif I only made it once and it didn't turn out well. It was all stringy lumpy for lack of a better term. So, I went searching on the net to find a solution for the next time cause I ain't giving up and there will be a next time! Perhaps it was simply the bakers chocolate I used. I brought the cream just to a boil and poured it immediately over the broken chocolate, let that set about 5 minutes or so and stirred from the center out. That is when it got all gross looking. When I read that article it made sense to me cause if you leave a candy bar out on a hot day it will melt smooth in the wrapper even at 90 degrees. I think next time I will pay more attention to the chocolate I buy and the amount of cocoa butter in it. teehee.....baking, there is a learning curve!

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