Icing A Sheet Cake

Decorating By lrcheer1 Updated 26 Oct 2010 , 7:58pm by cakesmart

lrcheer1 Posted 26 Oct 2010 , 2:38am
post #1 of 11

When I ice a sheet cake and then move the cake, the icing always cracks on top. Does this happen to you?

10 replies
CWR41 Posted 26 Oct 2010 , 4:56am
post #2 of 11

No, but it happens when the base underneath the cake isn't sturdy enough.

Apti Posted 26 Oct 2010 , 5:11am
post #3 of 11

lrcheer1, Welcome to CC!

As CWR41 said, you have to create a solid base that will not bend! For rectangle or square cakes, it is easy and cheap to cut your bases out of clean cardboard and cover with freezer paper, shiny side up. The best way to make a sturdy base is to have your bottom cardboard corrugations going in an east to west direction. Then the next piece of cardboard have the corrugations going in a north to south direction. Use 2 or 3 layers of cardboard.

If you purchase already made boards, just tape 2 or 3 together to give it the needed strength.

icer101 Posted 26 Oct 2010 , 5:14am
post #4 of 11

yes, a sturdy base, and don,t pick it up on both ends. I put one hand underneath the middle and one on the end. always.

cheriej Posted 26 Oct 2010 , 5:17am
post #5 of 11

You may have to reinforce your base like others have said. I make a lot of sheet cakes and they weigh a lot. I've had the tops crack also if you use a pure buttercream frosting then refrigerate it. If the cake moves at all it will crack on top when it comes to room temp. use shortening in your frosting and it will be much more pliable. But also make sure to use the sturdy base.

Apti Posted 26 Oct 2010 , 4:05pm
post #6 of 11

Here's a tip for transporting sheet cakes that I tried last night. Me and niece/nephews made 3 Halloween 9x13 cakes for their cub scout party. I used the lids to Sterilite storage boxes that I use to store my cake ingredients and just put each cake in a lid. It kept it from the car floor, the ridges inside the lid kept it from sliding around, and the lid was a perfect way to get it to and from the car without bending it. Just picked it up from the lid the way icer101 described. Perfect. Came home, slapped the lids back on their containers.

cakeythings1961 Posted 26 Oct 2010 , 4:52pm
post #7 of 11

What size sheet cake are you talking about? I make 12x18 cakes all the time, often 2-layers. Those things weigh a ton! The only material I've found that is sturdy enough to support these cakes (besides plywood!) is 1/2 inch foam core that I buy at michael's. It works really well and doesn't add any additional weight to the cake.

Apti Posted 26 Oct 2010 , 7:11pm
post #8 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakeythings1961

What size sheet cake are you talking about? I make 12x18 cakes all the time, often 2-layers. Those things weigh a ton! The only material I've found that is sturdy enough to support these cakes (besides plywood!) is 1/2 inch foam core that I buy at michael's. It works really well and doesn't add any additional weight to the cake.




That cake must weigh a ton! Is a single layer of 1/2" foamcore enough?
What do you use to cover your foamcore? Do you put a ribbon around the edge?

And, how do you cut your foamcore? I recently cut my first 1/4" foamcore for the 9x13 single layer cakes and tried using scissors and/or a knife and the edges were all raggedy--it was quite a chore. There must be an easier, neater way to cut foamcore.

mustang1964 Posted 26 Oct 2010 , 7:24pm
post #9 of 11

I recently read on a post that foam core can be cut easily with an electric hot e-xacto knife that can be bought at hobby stores. Also I read that buttercream is less likely to crack if you put a few drops of vinegar in the frosting and it won't change the flavor.
HTH

grams Posted 26 Oct 2010 , 7:55pm
post #10 of 11

I do alot of full sheet cakes and since I have been putting them on 1/2 foamcore boards I don't have the problem with cracked icing.
I cut them with a sharp exacto blade (not a heated one).
I cover them with contact paper or plastic table cloths.
I also like to support the cake with one hand under the middle and the other on the edge.
I stock up on the foam core when it is 50% off at Hobby Lobby. Then it is cheaper than regular cake boards

cakesmart Posted 26 Oct 2010 , 7:58pm
post #11 of 11

Agree on the sturdy base...this will be key to transporting the cake to its destination. There's a local cake supply store near me, and for larger cakes I get the sturdy cake boards. They are strong enough to support the cakes and are decorative.

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