How Much Cake Would I Need To Feed 120 People?

Decorating By Spectra Updated 26 Oct 2010 , 3:53am by Vanessa7

Spectra Posted 25 Oct 2010 , 1:42am
post #1 of 10

Hey everyone, I've never done a massive cake, just an 8 inch and 6 inch together, but a friend of mine is getting married so I am offering to do the cake. Great experience I hope. The number of guests is 120, and I'm sure they'd want to keep the 6 inch to freeze, so I'm trying to figure out what is the best way to do it.

Do I go by the Wilton Wedding cake chart? It says on their chart that if the cake is to be used as THE desert that the slices should be bigger, so then should I go by the party serving chart?? Any help, tips, advice would be greatly appreciated. I have until August, so lots of time. icon_smile.gif

9 replies
Vanessa7 Posted 25 Oct 2010 , 1:58am
post #2 of 10

I've heard many times that the Wilton serving sizes are based on EXTREMELY tiny pieces of cake and that you will typically end up short on cake. I use the below link to guide my tier sizes and it seems to work pretty accurately. Be sure to stablize those tiers though, don't want an untimely accident. icon_eek.gif Good luck on the wedding cake!

http://www.baking911.com/cakes/numberofservings_guide.htm

pmarks0 Posted 25 Oct 2010 , 2:11am
post #3 of 10

I wouldn't go with the party piece which is 2x2 becuase when it's a 4" deep that's a big piece of cake. I'd stick with the wedding size, and I agree with Vanessa7 that the pieces are a bit small. So, you're best if, going with a round cake to go with a 6/8/10/14 which according to Wilton will give you 140 pieces not counting the top 6" tier. If you're going with a a square cake, which is easier to cut too, then you could go 6/10/14 which they say gives you 148 pieces not including the top 6" tier. My personal preference is to have 4" difference between each tier as I feel it looks more asthetically pleasing. But there's nothing to say that's what it has to be. However you figure it out you will end up with a bit more cake than
you need. And if you aren't going to be cutting the cake, it's a good idea to provide a cutting guide so that the person cutting it has a clue as to how big the pieces are to be and how many to get out of each tier.

HTH

indydebi Posted 25 Oct 2010 , 6:15am
post #4 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vanessa7

I've heard many times that the Wilton serving sizes are based on EXTREMELY tiny pieces of cake and that you will typically end up short on cake.


Wow, this is so untrue in my experience! A 1x2x4 is a standard dessert size piece of cake (not a Jethro Bodine size, like we all eat at home in front of the TV when no one's around icon_lol.gif ) - about the size of a folded over peanut butter sandwich. I cut most of my wedding cakes. I NEVER ran out of cake, 99% had cake leftover and people were welcome to seconds. A lot of people would come up and ask me to cut them a smaller piece.

Most people hear the words "one inch" and they think "paper thin". This is so not the case.

These are pieces of cake I cut for an event for the Governor's office that are approx 1x2x4's. Notice they pretty much fill the plate. They are NOT teeny tiny. http:[email protected]/3856884667/

and a wedding:

http:[email protected]/1850415214/

Most venues cut by the Wilton Wedding chart. If there is a dinner at the wedding, you dont' want wasted cake because they were given a big 'ole honkin' piece of cake after a big meal. At my son's wedding last weekend, my sister's husband, who can compete with Jethro at the dinner table, said he first thought the piece of cake looked small but by the time he finished it, it was just right because he was stuffed after dinner AND dessert. If you're selling it by the slice, unless you adjust your pricing for bigger servings, you're throwing in free cake and leaving money on the table.

My son's cake (first one in my pics - white cake with red roses and black decor) was a 6/8/10/12 and designed to serve 130. We cut about 110 pieces (good size pieces!) and had the top two tiers left over. (My cutting method yields more pieces per tier than the yucky Circle-Method!)

Spectra Posted 25 Oct 2010 , 8:06pm
post #5 of 10

Thanks everyone! And thank you for those pictured indydebi! They said the guests would be between 100-120, so do you think I could get away with a 6 (for them to save) and then just cut the 8 and 10? Or should I just do the 12 as well?

Kind of nervous to bake such a big cake.

Spectra Posted 25 Oct 2010 , 8:09pm
post #6 of 10

Oh wait, you said the TOP two were remaining ok, guess I should still do all four teirs just in case.

kristanashley Posted 25 Oct 2010 , 8:21pm
post #7 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

(My cutting method yields more pieces per tier than the yucky Circle-Method!)




What is your cutting method?

cookiemom51 Posted 25 Oct 2010 , 8:32pm
post #8 of 10

Indydebi, I looked at your pic of serving sizes but the slices look almost as wide as they are tall...they look like a lot more than a 2" width. Am I missing something?

leily Posted 25 Oct 2010 , 9:09pm
post #9 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by kristanashley

Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

(My cutting method yields more pieces per tier than the yucky Circle-Method!)



What is your cutting method?




take a look in IndyDebi's signature. She has links to her blog about "how to cut a wedding cake" I have copied it all and have changed it to how to cut a tiered cake so i can send it with my birthday cake orders too. I've gotten a few responses back from customers that they were REALLY happy to have it b/c they had not cut anything but a sheet cake and were really comfortable using it and got plenty of servings out of their cakes.

Vanessa7 Posted 26 Oct 2010 , 3:53am
post #10 of 10

Glad to get the instructions on how to cut round cakes more efficiently. Guess I have always baked way too much cake and provided too big of cake servings. Thanks indydebi!

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