Chocolate Ganache

Decorating By ashleyj Updated 27 Oct 2010 , 11:27pm by LindaF144a

ashleyj Posted 22 Oct 2010 , 9:54pm
post #1 of 19

Need some more help! I have a bride that wants her cake covered in a chocolate ganache glaze. I have never added decorations to ganache. I've always used ganache as a frosting or filling; never poured it on the cake. The original plan was to make fondant scrolls and place them on buttercream icing but now that the cake will be covered in fondant I need to know if the scrolls will adhere to the ganache once it has reached room temp or will they begin to slide off the cake? The same question w/placing a ribbon around the bottom tiers..will the chocolate soak into the ribbon?
As always, your suggestions are greatly appreciated!!

18 replies
yums Posted 22 Oct 2010 , 10:17pm
post #2 of 19

I was just working with this about an hour ago. I used melted chocolate to glue on the decorations and before I used fondant decorations and they stuck by themselves. It will be fine from my experience.

ashleyj Posted 24 Oct 2010 , 3:32am
post #3 of 19

Oh good! I am glad to hear that. So once the chocolate sets, it doesn't get soft?

MJTKNT Posted 24 Oct 2010 , 3:44am
post #4 of 19

Once the chocolate sets, it gets hard. Be sure to use a 100:50 ratio with your chocolate:cream unless you're using white chocolate.

ashleyj Posted 24 Oct 2010 , 7:46pm
post #5 of 19

I am covering the cake with a pourable ganache so doesn't that call for equal parts of chocolate and cream?

MJTKNT Posted 24 Oct 2010 , 7:57pm
post #6 of 19

Give this a read: http://sugaredblog.blogspot.com/2009/01/new-orleans-doberge-cake.html

It recommends the 2:1 ratio. I'm not sure if you did a 1:1 ratio, if your chocolate would ever set...

carmijok Posted 24 Oct 2010 , 8:22pm
post #7 of 19

I've never seen ganache set hard enough to attach anything like scrolls to it. You can mold ganache into truffles once it's cool, but it never fully hardens. You could use a melting covering chocolate like Merckens, but you can't add any cream to it. It would harden though. But it would crack when cut. Perhaps you need to look into doing molding chocolate...or even chocolate fondant instead.

Always back your ribbon with wax paper or even Press n seal to avoid bleed through.

yums Posted 24 Oct 2010 , 9:34pm
post #8 of 19

I used the wilton candy melts with a 3:1 ratio and it set perfectly. Hard enough to lightly touch without leaving a mark, held lage fondant "handles" and icing bubbles. It didn't crack when cutting.

ashleyj Posted 25 Oct 2010 , 1:05am
post #9 of 19

Regarding the wax paper to prevent bleed thru, do you cut a strip of wax paper and place it around the cake and then place the actual ribbon over that?

carmijok Posted 25 Oct 2010 , 2:40pm
post #10 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by ashleyj

Regarding the wax paper to prevent bleed thru, do you cut a strip of wax paper and place it around the cake and then place the actual ribbon over that?




I always attach it to the back of the ribbon with double sided tape...unless you use Press n seal which adheres on it's own. Don't know why you couldn't put it around the cake first as long as it's the same width. You might still have to attach it to the ribbon here and there for security.

ashleyj Posted 25 Oct 2010 , 9:39pm
post #11 of 19

Thank you for the ribbon tip! I'm so glad to know this b/c several times my icing will bleed thru causing my ribbon to look wet. Another great idea to add to my list!!

vickistark Posted 26 Oct 2010 , 3:19am
post #12 of 19

so do you basically use the same ganache recipe for pourable, whipped, and pipeable? pour when room temp? whip after refrigerated? scoop into piping bag when cooled to pipe it instead of pouring it over cake? I am new to this and learning something new every time I come here. Thank you all for sharing your knowledge!

ashleyj Posted 26 Oct 2010 , 10:54am
post #13 of 19

Yes. I was confused about that as well but that is correct.

LindaF144a Posted 26 Oct 2010 , 11:48am
post #14 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by MJTKNT

Give this a read: http://sugaredblog.blogspot.com/2009/01/new-orleans-doberge-cake.html

It recommends the 2:1 ratio. I'm not sure if you did a 1:1 ratio, if your chocolate would ever set...




I have used a 1:1 ratio and it does set. It is liquid when you first make it and then it hardens as you let it set. The longer it sets, the more it hardens.

Keep in mind the ratio is for weight, not volume. So when I did a 1:1 ratio it was 12 ounces of chocolate to 12 ounces of cream, which was 1 1/2 cups , or 1 1/4 I'm going by memory. I don't have it right in front of me.

I did use real chocolate and not candy melts, but I don't believe that should make a difference.

I would suggest that you pour it on right after you make if you intend to do pour the glaze over the cake. If you pour it, you may need more than one layer to get enough thickness to add scrolls. I am not picturing in my head what you mean by scrolls. Will they lay flat against the cake or be sticking out of the cake?

LindaF144a Posted 26 Oct 2010 , 11:51am
post #15 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by carmijok

I've never seen ganache set hard enough to attach anything like scrolls to it. You can mold ganache into truffles once it's cool, but it never fully hardens. You could use a melting covering chocolate like Merckens, but you can't add any cream to it. It would harden though. But it would crack when cut. Perhaps you need to look into doing molding chocolate...or even chocolate fondant instead.

Always back your ribbon with wax paper or even Press n seal to avoid bleed through.




Hmmmm...I need a definition of harden. Do you mean like the outside of ice cream bars hard, or hard enough to use as frosting? I'm getting a little confused.

julzs71 Posted 26 Oct 2010 , 12:03pm
post #16 of 19

If I do chocolate on the outside of a cake I will make frost it with ganache that has been set and make that look pretty perfect, then stick it in the fridge and then I put it in the fridge for around a half hour, and then do tthe pourable ganache on top of that.

ashleyj Posted 26 Oct 2010 , 5:20pm
post #17 of 19

Can you stack ganache covered cakes like you do those covered in fondant or BC? What I mean is after they've set up in the frig are they fairly easy to work with as far as stacking?

carmijok Posted 27 Oct 2010 , 10:37pm
post #18 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by LindaF144

Quote:
Originally Posted by carmijok

I've never seen ganache set hard enough to attach anything like scrolls to it. You can mold ganache into truffles once it's cool, but it never fully hardens. You could use a melting covering chocolate like Merckens, but you can't add any cream to it. It would harden though. But it would crack when cut. Perhaps you need to look into doing molding chocolate...or even chocolate fondant instead.

Always back your ribbon with wax paper or even Press n seal to avoid bleed through.



Hmmmm...I need a definition of harden. Do you mean like the outside of ice cream bars hard, or hard enough to use as frosting? I'm getting a little confused.




To me, if someone used a coating chocolate such as Merckens (which I use for cakeballs), the coating would be hard enough to crack --much like ice cream bars. And of course depending how thick it was would depend on how hard it would be to cut. I don't know..I've never glazed an entire cake with coating chocolate and tried to add decor to it. I've only stuck little fondant toppers on top of small cakeballs.

LindaF144a Posted 27 Oct 2010 , 11:27pm
post #19 of 19

Ah I see, we are talking about two different things then. Both are ganache, but I am talking about what I use as a filling, which is much much thicker than what is used for cake balls.

I don't consider the coating for cake balls as a ganache. Ganache is the filling used in chocolate truffles with a chocolate coating on the outside. Ganache has cream added to make it creamy and the coating on the outside of cake balls and ganache truffles have no cream added, thus making it thicker and dry harder than ganache.\\

HTH to explain my train of thought.

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