Naty Posted 21 Oct 2010 , 3:06am
post #1 of

Thanks,
Naty

9 replies
indydebi Posted 21 Oct 2010 , 3:17am
post #2 of

12x18

Naty Posted 21 Oct 2010 , 3:27am
post #3 of

Thank you very much for your reply.......that was quick!!!

Naty

smbegg Posted 21 Oct 2010 , 3:33am
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Mine is 13x18. I think that you will find that many people have their own standards.

Stephanie

indydebi Posted 21 Oct 2010 , 4:27am
post #5 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by smbegg

I think that you will find that many people have their own standards.



Which I don't understand. A 1/2 sheet is a half sheet. And someone can't really just "make up" whatever they want to call a half sheet. A cup of milk is 8 ounces. Someone can't just come along and say "well my cup is only 6 ounces, so that's what I call a cup." icon_eek.gif

I read one thread in which a CC'er said her oven only held a 11x15 "....so that's what I call my full sheet." HUH?????? icon_eek.gif Setting 'standards' and trying to do price comparisons on full-sheets vs. full-sheets and someone is basing it on how big their personal home oven is?????

dont' get it. dont' get it at all.

smbegg Posted 21 Oct 2010 , 1:29pm
post #6 of

I use a 9x13 for a 1/4 sheet. I use 2-9x13's as a half, thus making it 13X18. I don't have a 1/2 sheet pan.

I would not consider an 11x15 a half.

I was more meaning that there is not an "official" industry standard, so some may do as you posted.

Stephanie

ddaigle Posted 21 Oct 2010 , 1:59pm
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I can see the confusion though. Where I work, we use the pan inserts/extenders and bake 2 half sheets at a time measuring out at about 11x16. We call that our "half sheet". We bake 4 quarter sheets at a time and only end up being like an 8x12. Places that bake in bulk have different dimensions, but as Debi stated.....12x18 is a true half sheet.

leily Posted 21 Oct 2010 , 7:07pm
post #8 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by smbegg

was more meaning that there is not an "official" industry standard, so some may do as you posted.




Actually there is... over the years people have just added different size pans to the market.

Here is a link with a good post from IndyDebi about what the full sheet/half/quarter sizes were used in bakeries.
http://cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-628706-.html

There is also someone else who has posted a link a few times (but i can't find a post with it now) to the history of sheet cakes and their sizes. Maybe someone else will remember who posted it or have the link to it.

leily Posted 21 Oct 2010 , 7:09pm
post #9 of

Also... i'm not trying to argue over the extra inch you have stated is your half sheet. The extra inch one way or the other isn't going to make that big of a difference, but when you see people start using an 11x15 as a full sheet instead of closer to the standard of 18x24, there's a HUGE difference there.

CWR41 Posted 21 Oct 2010 , 7:38pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by leily

There is also someone else who has posted a link a few times (but i can't find a post with it now) to the history of sheet cakes and their sizes. Maybe someone else will remember who posted it or have the link to it.




Hi Leily--If you're referring to my post about full sheet size, it wasn't really the history of sheet cake sizes (although IndyDebi commented: "great history on cake sizes! thumbs_up.gif "). I didn't jump in with the info because this thread was about 1/2 sheets, but I'll paste what I had posted about full sheets in case it's helpful:

A commercial Bun pan is 18" x 26" (outside measurement), and because they are tapered for nesting or making them stackable, the inside measurement is 16.5" x 24.5".

A commercial full sheet is 16" x 24". They are baked in 16" x 24" bakeable cardboard trays that fit into the Bun pans (flat surface portion) which are used during baking for support and handling purposes.

A true commercial full sheet (16" x 24") serves 96 (unit wt. 106-124 oz.).

If this size pan doesn't fit in your oven, and you are baking two 12" x 18" (54 serving) half sheets, they would serve 108 total.

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