Is This Chocolate Cake Recipe Good For Stacking?

Baking By toni1218 Updated 21 Oct 2010 , 2:59pm by toni1218

toni1218 Posted 20 Oct 2010 , 4:01pm
post #1 of 9

Hi there,

I usually make the "Hershey's Perfectly Perfect Chocolate Cake" and it comes out great each time, however I want to use it for my daughter's birthday cake and wondered if it will hold up to stacking. My cake will only be two-tiers (One 10" round 4" high and one 6" round, 4" high) I have included the recipe below and if any of the "seasoned bakers" would be so kind to have a look and let me know what they think. I don't want to bake them and then find out at the last minute that it wasn't such a good idea Thanks so much!

Receipe from hersheys.com

2 cups sugar
1-3/4 cups all-purpose flour
3/4 cup HERSHEY'S Cocoa
1-1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1-1/2 teaspoons baking soda
1 teaspoon salt
2 eggs
1 cup milk
1/2 cup vegetable oil
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
1 cup boiling water
"PERFECTLY CHOCOLATE" CHOCOLATE FROSTING(recipe follows)

Directions:1. Heat oven to 350°F. Grease and flour two 9-inch round baking pans.

2. Stir together sugar, flour, cocoa, baking powder, baking soda and salt in large bowl. Add eggs, milk, oil and vanilla; beat on medium speed of mixer 2 minutes. Stir in boiling water (batter will be thin). Pour batter into prepared pans.

3. Bake 30 to 35 minutes or until wooden pick inserted in center comes out clean. Cool 10 minutes; remove from pans to wire racks. Cool completely. Frost with "PERFECTLY CHOCOLATE" CHOCOLATE FROSTING. 10 to 12 servings.

VARIATIONS:
ONE-PAN CAKE: Grease and flour 13x9x2-inch baking pan. Heat oven to 350° F. Pour batter into prepared pan. Bake 35 to 40 minutes. Cool completely. Frost.

THREE LAYER CAKE: Grease and flour three 8-inch round baking pans. Heat oven to 350°F. Pour batter into prepared pans. Bake 30 to 35 minutes. Cool 10 minutes; remove from pans to wire racks. Cool completely. Frost.

BUNDT CAKE: Grease and flour 12-cup Bundt pan. Heat oven to 350°F. Pour batter into prepared pan. Bake 50 to 55 minutes. Cool 15 minutes; remove from pan to wire rack. Cool completely. Frost.

CUPCAKES: Line muffin cups (2-1/2 inches in diameter) with paper bake cups. Heat oven to 350°F. Fill cups 2/3 full with batter. Bake 22 to 25 minutes. Cool completely. Frost. About 30 cupcakes.


Thanks again! icon_smile.gif

8 replies
leily Posted 20 Oct 2010 , 6:09pm
post #2 of 9

any cake can be used for a tierd cake. The cake itself doesn't support the upper tiers, your dowels and plate system does the supporting. You want to use dowels and plates for every 4" of veritical height. (and if you're using cardboard under the 6" that is fine, it doesn't have to be a plastic plate)

So yes, your recipe will be fine for a stacked cake.

toni1218 Posted 20 Oct 2010 , 6:43pm
post #3 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by leily

any cake can be used for a tierd cake. The cake itself doesn't support the upper tiers, your dowels and plate system does the supporting. You want to use dowels and plates for every 4" of veritical height. (and if you're using cardboard under the 6" that is fine, it doesn't have to be a plastic plate)

So yes, your recipe will be fine for a stacked cake.




Thank you. I have read some posts where people seemed to like to use more dense cakes. I usually make cupcakes with the receipe so I honestly don't remember what the density of the cake really is. If I am using fondant would the density of the cake matter more? (Btw... I am using fondant). I do apologize but I am a beginner.

Thanks icon_smile.gif

leily Posted 20 Oct 2010 , 6:46pm
post #4 of 9

The density of the cake can come into play when using fondant, but your recipe should be fine. Even a straight cake mix (usually softer than scratch cakes) can hold up to fondant. of course as long as you aren't rolling it out 1/2" thick (which would be way to thick anyways)

toni1218 Posted 20 Oct 2010 , 7:00pm
post #5 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by leily

The density of the cake can come into play when using fondant, but your recipe should be fine. Even a straight cake mix (usually softer than scratch cakes) can hold up to fondant. of course as long as you aren't rolling it out 1/2" thick (which would be way to thick anyways)




Thanks! My first fondant cake was sort of a disaster - you could see the layers of cake with the filling thru the fondant icon_cry.gif lol.. I am sure it probably was because I didn't crumb coat it and then apply another layer of BC... however I need to ask this... could that happen if your cake is to soft and you do everything right?

Thanks icon_smile.gif

jenscreativity Posted 20 Oct 2010 , 7:12pm
post #6 of 9

I want to try this recipe you posted! Thanks! Also, as far as filling showing through..make sure your dam is good, and not too much and no need to add too much filling either...filling should be at least 1/4"-1/2" lower than dam so it doesn't seep over the dam and cause it to constantly bulge. Also, you can place cake pans with a little heavy book in it, while it settles for awhile prior to decorating. You need to let it settle to prevent bulging. Hope this helps!

toni1218 Posted 20 Oct 2010 , 7:39pm
post #7 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by jenscreativity

I want to try this recipe you posted! Thanks! Also, as far as filling showing through..make sure your dam is good, and not too much and no need to add too much filling either...filling should be at least 1/4"-1/2" lower than dam so it doesn't seep over the dam and cause it to constantly bulge. Also, you can place cake pans with a little heavy book in it, while it settles for awhile prior to decorating. You need to let it settle to prevent bulging. Hope this helps!




Thanks for the tips! The recipe is yummy and everyone likes it. It is moist and hard to believe it's from scratch... and it's easy! I don't use the Hershey cocoa b/c it's not really readily available where I shop. I was only planning to put a buttercream filling in between (not to creative with fillings yet! icon_smile.gif) Just a question a bit off topic of the receipe... once your cake is completely decorated where should you store it before bringing it to the party - cold cellar?

Thanks icon_smile.gif

jenscreativity Posted 20 Oct 2010 , 10:51pm
post #8 of 9

No problem ! What do you use in place of Hershey's cocoa then for your recipe???

Ok, you can store your cake room temperature as long as filling is NON perishable. No need to be in cool temperatures as cake tends to dry out in refridgerator and cold temps. Just room temp is great! It takes about a good 3-5 days to rot..so you will be fine.

Enjoy!

toni1218 Posted 21 Oct 2010 , 2:59pm
post #9 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by jenscreativity

No problem ! What do you use in place of Hershey's cocoa then for your recipe???

Ok, you can store your cake room temperature as long as filling is NON perishable. No need to be in cool temperatures as cake tends to dry out in refridgerator and cold temps. Just room temp is great! It takes about a good 3-5 days to rot..so you will be fine.

Enjoy!




Hi!

I think I used the Hershey's once as I found it. For the other times I used Ghiardelli, or whatever brand the grocery store had (had to send the hubby) (FRYS I think). If you can't get Hershey's use your favourite cocoa. I am just a once in a while baker so I don't have too much experience - I try but my stuff doesn't always come out! I am hoping this cake adventure for my daughter's birthday is better than the last! icon_smile.gif

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