To Freeze Or Not To Freeze

Decorating By graciesj Updated 21 Oct 2010 , 6:52pm by Mikel79

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graciesj Posted 18 Oct 2010 , 11:41pm
post #1 of 17

I have a baby shower cake due the 7th of november and just found out last night that I'm required to work from the 25th-nov6th!!!
Now, I'm trying not to panicicon_smile.gif))
I'm baking a pregnancy belly cake and I'm also throwing in some lovely cupcakes; she's a friend of mineicon_smile.gif
So my question is, can I freeze the cakes & cupcakes and for how long? Now she gave me a recipe that she wants me to make so hey I'm not sure. Anyone who can help, please do so! thank-you graciesj

16 replies
 eperales0411  Cake Central Cake Decorator Profile
eperales0411 Posted 18 Oct 2010 , 11:55pm
post #2 of 17

I am not sure if you can freeze this recipe, but what I would do is make the recipe as a try out. This would let you know if you can carve, what it tastes like, texture, is it moist, ect. Then you could freeze a few days, thaw it, and see the results. Good lu icon_smile.gif ck!!

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leah_s Posted 19 Oct 2010 , 12:13am
post #3 of 17

With proper wrapping you can freeze any type of baked goods.

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graciesj Posted 19 Oct 2010 , 1:12am
post #4 of 17

[quote="leah_s"]With proper wrapping you can freeze any type of baked goods.[/quote]

thank-you, would you mind sharing your wrapping technique? thx againicon_smile.gif

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graciesj Posted 19 Oct 2010 , 1:14am
post #5 of 17

[quote="eperales0411"]I am not sure if you can freeze this recipe, but what I would do is make the recipe as a try out. This would let you know if you can carve, what it tastes like, texture, is it moist, ect. Then you could freeze a few days, thaw it, and see the results. Good lu icon_smile.gif ck!![/quote]

I've decided to bake my son's school a Halloween themed cake, so yes I do have an opportunity to pre-bake and find out exactly how it is! thank-you again for your inputicon_smile.gif

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SpringFlour Posted 19 Oct 2010 , 1:33am
post #6 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by graciesj

thank-you, would you mind sharing your wrapping technique? thx againicon_smile.gif




I wrap in plastic wrap, then wrap again in plastic wrap, then wrap again in plastic wrap. THEN, I wrap it once more in plastic wrap or foil. Make sure it is airtight! Overkill? Maybe, but this method has never failed to produce a beautiful, moist cake!

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graciesj Posted 19 Oct 2010 , 1:35am
post #7 of 17

[quote="SpringFlour"][quote="graciesj"]thank-you, would you mind sharing your wrapping technique? thx againicon_smile.gif[/quote]

I wrap in plastic wrap, then wrap again in plastic wrap, then wrap again in plastic wrap. THEN, I wrap it once more in plastic wrap or foil. Make sure it is airtight! Overkill? Maybe, but this method has never failed to produce a beautiful, moist cake![/quote]

thank-you sooooo muchicon_smile.gif))))) I can go to bed nowicon_smile.gif)))) you're a sweet hearticon_smile.gifgsj thumbs_up.gif

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denetteb Posted 19 Oct 2010 , 2:28am
post #8 of 17

I just wrap it in one layer of wrap or a zip lock or storage container, depending on the size of cakes or number of cuppies. On the Wilton site they did a test and froze some cakes with no wrap and they thawed fine and moist. So if you want to do multiple layers, go ahead, but it really isn't necessary. Think about all the things frozen in a store, there is only a single layer of plastic or cardboard for most items, including cakes and pies and they are frozen way longer than you will be freezing your cake.

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mcdonald Posted 19 Oct 2010 , 2:46am
post #9 of 17

I just wrap mine in plastic wrap but I just give it a good wrap once around and then in the freezer. I don't overwrap and I have people tell me all the time that they can tell that it is a freshly baked cake and so moist. I don't dare tell them it has been in the freezer for a while!!! I love it! Used to wrap a layer of foil but it would always "dent" up my cake layer so I blew that off and just use saran.

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graciesj Posted 19 Oct 2010 , 11:27am
post #10 of 17

thank-you so much for your input "denettb" & " mcdonald". At least I can rest my brian that my cakes will turn out fineicon_smile.gif))))you guys r awesome

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chocolatestone Posted 19 Oct 2010 , 12:10pm
post #11 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by denetteb

I just wrap it in one layer of wrap or a zip lock or storage container, depending on the size of cakes or number of cuppies. On the Wilton site they did a test and froze some cakes with no wrap and they thawed fine and moist. So if you want to do multiple layers, go ahead, but it really isn't necessary. Think about all the things frozen in a store, there is only a single layer of plastic or cardboard for most items, including cakes and pies and they are frozen way longer than you will be freezing your cake.




I was watching Cake Boss the one day and I noticed that the cake layer they take out of the freezer are never wrapped but then again I don't think they cakes freeze for long periods.

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graciesj Posted 20 Oct 2010 , 2:14pm
post #12 of 17

[quote="chocolatestone"][quote="denetteb"]I just wrap it in one layer of wrap or a zip lock or storage container, depending on the size of cakes or number of cuppies. On the Wilton site they did a test and froze some cakes with no wrap and they thawed fine and moist. So if you want to do multiple layers, go ahead, but it really isn't necessary. Think about all the things frozen in a store, there is only a single layer of plastic or cardboard for most items, including cakes and pies and they are frozen way longer than you will be freezing your cake.[/quote]

I was watching the one day and I noticed that the cake layer they take out of the freezer are never wrapped but then again I don't think they cakes freeze for long periods.[/quote]

Okay so, the question still remains!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! TO FREEZE OR NOT TO FREEZE???????????????
I'M CONFUSED NOWicon_sad.gif(((((((((((

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disney16 Posted 20 Oct 2010 , 6:56pm
post #13 of 17

Freeze!!! and you will be surprised at how well it turns out.

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graciesj Posted 20 Oct 2010 , 8:55pm
post #14 of 17

[quote="disney16"]Freeze!!! and you will be surprised at how well it turns out.[/quote]

Okay I'm baking a trial cake tonight for next week and I will freeze it! I will let everyone know what happens!!!!!! thank-you

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CrescentMoon Posted 21 Oct 2010 , 4:12pm
post #15 of 17

do you wrap the cake after it has completly cooled, or while it is still slightly warm? I have heard both.

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graciesj Posted 21 Oct 2010 , 4:21pm
post #16 of 17

[quote="CrescentMoon"]do you wrap the cake after it has completly cooled, or while it is still slightly warm? I have heard both.[/quote]


I normally wait until the cakes have cooled for at least 1/2 hr, then wrapicon_smile.gificon_smile.gif

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Mikel79 Posted 21 Oct 2010 , 6:52pm
post #17 of 17

I never had any luck freezing. I do not do it any longer...

JMO! =)

Michael

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